My Computing.Net, Message List (5)??

Hewlett-packard / Ny544aa-aba p6210f
September 16, 2011 at 16:40:00
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium (x64) Service Pack 1 (build 7601), 2.6 GHz / 5887 MB
In My Computing.Net, Message List (5), what is the "5"? When I open the Message List I see 23 items. I presume that the "5" refers to 5 of the 23, but which 5?

And if I could squeeze in another question about which I've been wondering, is there a distinction on Computing.net between "message" and "post"? I have 2 guesses:

1. A post is a message that begins a new thread.

2. A post is not a message, but begins a new thread.

Thanks


See More: My Computing.Net, Message List (5)??

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#1
September 16, 2011 at 16:46:11
Hey,

The 5 is the number of messages that have received a reply since you last viewed them.

Justin


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#2
September 16, 2011 at 17:24:48
The 5 is the number of messages that have received a reply since you last viewed them.

So how do I tell which ones they are?


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#3
September 16, 2011 at 22:17:21
Yeah, that's a tough one to figure out. On your message list the ones with new replies are in bold type. Or you can click on 'show messages with replies' and BYZINGO!!!, there they are!

And (this is sheer genius on my part so don't tell anyone, shhhh!) I made the 'show messages with replies' a favorite so I have a direct link so all I do is click on it and BYZINGO, there they are.

Oh yeah, more of these !!!!!!!!!!


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Related Solutions

#4
September 16, 2011 at 22:46:43
DAVEINCAPS,

That works, or you can look for the ones in bold.

Justin


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#5
September 16, 2011 at 23:00:53
Justin,

So I go to the list and click on the bold ones. All but one thread had nothing I hadn't already seen..


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#6
September 16, 2011 at 23:06:10
Edit If you refresh the thread page and see a new reply there your message list doesn't update that you've seen it so it still thinks you've got an unread new reply. It's only if you open the page from the message list that it gets updated and knows you've seen it.

I kind of miss jboy and how he would have responded in this thread and maybe others by this OP.

Google can be a letdown sometimes. You think you've invented a new word but google already has 3 independent hits for byzingo.


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#7
September 17, 2011 at 00:05:45
Justin,

I also asked,
" Is there a distinction on Computing.net between "message" and "post"? I have 3 guesses:
1. A post is a message that begins a new thread.
2. A post is not a message, but begins a new thread."
3. All messages are posts, and all posts are messages. IOW the terms are interchangeable.

Thanks


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#8
September 17, 2011 at 01:19:16
DAVEINCAPS wrote:

Yeah, that's a tough one to figure out. On your message list the ones with new replies are in bold type. Or you can click on 'show messages with replies' and BYZINGO!!!, there they are!
And (this is sheer genius on my part so don't tell anyone, shhhh!) I made the 'show messages with replies' a favorite so I have a direct link so all I do is click on it and BYZINGO, there they are.

Excellent idea. The link is http://www.computing.net/cgi-bin/my...

Because of the updating problem, when I get an email saying that someone has responded to a post of mine, I won't click on the link in the email. Instead I'll use the Active Word that gets me directly to http://www.computing.net/cgi-bin/my... .


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#9
September 17, 2011 at 06:41:37
Were you previously named - Wengier? :-)

Good Luck - Keep us posted.


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#10
September 17, 2011 at 08:39:42
Hey,

I believe a posting is any reply or start of a thread and message is a new thread.

Do you see anything that contradictions this definition?

Justin


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#11
September 17, 2011 at 08:39:43
Hey,

I believe a posting is any reply or start of a thread and message is a new thread.

Do you see anything that contradictions this definition?

Justin


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#12
September 17, 2011 at 09:55:06
Hey,
I believe a posting is any reply or start of a thread and message is a new thread.
Do you see anything that contradictions this definition?
Justin

I'll need to understand it first. Please explain "message is a new thread".

Thanks


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#13
September 17, 2011 at 10:40:20
Hey,

New "discussion" new "question" however you want to call it... This entire message we are talking on right now is one thread.

Justin


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#14
September 17, 2011 at 11:48:10
New "discussion" new "question" however you want to call it... This entire message we are talking on right now is one thread.
Justin

OK, that makes sense in the context of what I see when I open
http://www.computing.net/cgi-bin/my...

except that some of those messages/threads are not new at all.

It does seem strange to call a whole thread a message, however -- but if that's the term here, that's the term. I'm glad I now understand.

Thanks, Justin


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#15
September 17, 2011 at 14:22:59
This is all fun. Let me try:

When you post a new question it is the start of a thread. As people answer the question it adds to that thread. If the original poster wants to add more it is done as if he/she were "responding to the question". The length of the thread varies with how many answers it gets - this one, so far, is up to #15.

Never start a new thread about a question you have already asked, unless it is so long ago that it has vanished off the first page (the "unless" part is not a forum rule but just my own idea). Duplicate posts can get removed, especially if they are within a few days of each other.

Any particular poster can have several questions (and resulting threads) if they are about "different problems or topics".

Sometimes you have to refresh page to see very recent changes - key F5 will do this).

About all of the above is similar on any internet forum.

Messages that you have looked at will no longer be bold in "My Computing.Net".


Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
September 17, 2011 at 14:59:07
Derek,

About all of the above is the similar on any internet forum.

Yes it is in my experience too. I am completely familiar with the concept of a thread.

Messages that you have looked at will no longer be bold in "My Computing.Net".

It's calling a thread a message that threw me off. You don't find that terminology strange?


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#17
September 17, 2011 at 15:31:58
I tend to talk about a "post" but understand that to find a post on here one uses "Message Find". To me a thread implies something that is ongoing - a series of linked responses. I haven't really found any of this much of a problem and possibly everyone would have their own different ideas about wording.

To me, terminology matters far more when dealing with technical terms (such as memory normally being assumed to be RAM, rather than HD space).


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#18
September 17, 2011 at 15:37:55
Sure. I can live with "message" for thread, now that I know that that's what it means here.

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#19
September 17, 2011 at 17:25:51
I am at this moment writting a post in reply to your post that has now become a thread. I am sure this will eventually become a message when someone calls one of us an ( insert insult here ). It will then be a message because it then has become personal.

Until then this is a post in a thread started with a post full of posts.


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#20
September 17, 2011 at 17:43:09
How come I never have these problems?

PS: The word is Bazinga!


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#21
September 17, 2011 at 22:19:56
But...but I just made it up. It was supposed to catch on like wildfire like 'he shoots he scores' or 'let's get ready to rumble' but after saying it a few times byzingo sounds more like it belongs in a Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan movie.

A thread is a topic in a forum. Within a thread a 'post', when used as a noun, is the same as a message or response. But when using it as a verb you can say you post a message or post a reply.


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#22
September 17, 2011 at 22:48:51
Sheldon in "The Big Bang Theory" says Bazinga when he's scored a point in an argument or won a contest of sorts.

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#23
September 17, 2011 at 23:21:36
Oh, I've never watched that show. From its promos I've pegged it as one of those sitcoms where real comedy is replaced by sexual innuendo and a laugh track tells you when it's supposed to be funny.

Another catch phrase I get a kick out of--there's a commercial for a gym, uh 'fitness center', where a musclebound guy wanders in and keeps repeating in a Schwarzenegger accent "I lift things up and put them down" until he's ushered out the back door.


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#24
September 18, 2011 at 03:16:03
That reminds me of "Head On Apply directly to the forehead...Head On Apply directly to the forehead...Head On Apply directly to the forehead..." I think I saw this for like six months before they said what it was or what it was for.

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#25
September 18, 2011 at 18:29:39
Yeah, sometimes they like to do that. A 'coming soon' kind of thing where they don't tell you what it is. Of course it's risky. Potential customers can get bored pretty quick.

If I picked up on it right the point of the gym commercial was 'this is a gym for regular people'. They do it by bringing in a caricature of a body-builder type who's maybe long on steroids and short on intelligence and then show him the door. But what makes it great is those few short words and how he exaggerates the last one, D-o-o-w-w-n-n.


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#26
September 19, 2011 at 09:58:17
It's a funny thing but I find that some adverts actually produce a negative effect.

In the UK we have a particularly annoying one for "gocompare" website (bunch of wally's in silly clothes singing opera badly). I have now vowed never to go to that website.

We have another for "comparethemarket.com" using Meerkat puppets. It works on the supposed confusion between Markets and Meerkats. They also have a spoof website for "comparethemeerkats.com" which I find quite funny - this one:
http://www.comparethemeerkat.com/
(click the top link).

Have either of these hit USA TV?


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#27
September 19, 2011 at 10:38:45
What's a "wally"?

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#28
September 19, 2011 at 11:57:54
....................................... click me riider
.
Demonstrative exspelling
... there is logic to this madness!
http://img811.imageshack.us/img811/...
the element of surprise Grrrrrrrr


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#29
September 19, 2011 at 13:48:27
I haven't seen anything like that here. (If you wonder what a meerkat is, think a tall prairie dog. Oh, there's some video on youtube from a surveillance camera showing a New Mexico cop screwing some babe on the hood of his car with a prairie dog watching. It took them a week or so to fire the cop.)

I guess some others found the gym commercial amusing too. There's a few uploads to youtube. Here's one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FGZ...

That's a 60 second spot. There's some 30 second uploads too.


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#30
September 19, 2011 at 14:00:22
... here's one when he was younger he still has the trousers. heh heh!
................................................................................ (.......unbelievable)
Demonstrative exspelling
... there is logic to this madness!
http://img811.imageshack.us/img811/...
the element of surprise Grrrrrrrr


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#31
September 19, 2011 at 14:19:59
Oh yeah, I saw that kid on one of those entertainment shows awhile back. I don't know if he's a genetic freak or his parents have been feeding him steroids.

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#32
September 21, 2011 at 20:11:13
Mavis007 just for interest sake why do you precede all your statements with a row of periods (full stops).....................................................................just wondering!

.................................................................................Regards


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#33
September 21, 2011 at 21:37:07
Ok I will freely admit I am in not the greatest shape but.......I can articulate a bit more than "I pick things up and put them doowwwn." I also don't feel I am the sharpest knife in the light socket so I will stay away from that fitness center. I can already pick stuff up and put it down. Heck I can even pick up stuff on the top shelf and move it to another.

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#34
September 22, 2011 at 00:22:08
Ewen ... not "all" #32
.
Demonstrative exspelling
... there is logic to this madness!
http://img811.imageshack.us/img811/...
the element of surprise Grrrrrrrr


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#35
September 23, 2011 at 16:33:51
Mavis, just adding a bit of a "stir", the thread has turned somewhat comical so I just added another bit of nonsense.

Regards.


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