Solved How would you interpret the rules to this contest?

Dell / Inspiron one 2320
February 21, 2014 at 20:54:03
Specs: Windows XP, 3.3 GHz / 4001 MB
If you were presented with these statements, how would you interpret them?

Bob has a score of 50%. Sue will win if her score is 10% or more higher than Bob's."

What is the minimum score required for Sue to win?

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✔ Best Answer
February 22, 2014 at 22:16:47
I think I was a bit dismissive of the 60 percenters. When using exact scores instead of percentages in my # 8 there really is no way to get anything but 55%. After that I could see that when only using percentages, as the problem was originally stated, it's somewhat murky. You can't be sure if the '10% more' means
50% + 10% or 50% + 50% x 10%. Just another example of the difficulty of converting language to math. So I apologize for what I was thinking about your early childhood education. . .


#1
February 21, 2014 at 21:57:20
55% would be my answer. 10% more than 50% equally 55%.

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#2
February 21, 2014 at 22:16:41
I would have interpreted it as 60%, however I see the logic of OtheHill

::mike


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#3
February 21, 2014 at 22:25:30
Yeah, 55% is the only possible answer with the information given.

If it said Sue would win if her score was 10% of the total more than Bob's score then she would need 60%. Or if the ". . .than Bob's" had been left off the description and the second sentence had just been 'Sue will win if her score is 10% or more higher' you could probably successfully argue the answer would be 60%. But once you base the '10% more' on Bob's score instead of the total possible the minimum she would need is 55%.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 21, 2014 at 23:19:42
60% makes more sense to me

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#5
February 22, 2014 at 06:02:54
I would say 60%. But the statement is ambiguous and both 55% and 60% are legitimate answers.

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#6
February 22, 2014 at 08:16:19
Thanks. Those are exactly the answers I thought I would get.

There is a post in the Office forum asking for an Excel formula to highlight a cell when the value was 10% or more higher than the value in another cell. The solution is obviously dependent on how you interpret the statements.

I just wanted to make sure it wasn't only me that felt the ambiguity.

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#7
February 22, 2014 at 10:09:37
10% of 50% = 5%. That is how much Sue needs to beat Bob. 50% + 5% = 55% OR MORE. No other possible correct answer.

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#8
February 22, 2014 at 11:52:24
Exactly. Use some numbers instead. "Bob got 20 out of 40 questions correct (50%). Sue will win if her score is 10% or more higher than Bob's."

Bob's score was 20, not 40. 10% more than 20 is 22. 22 out of 40 is 55%. Right?

If you base the 10% increase on 40--the total number of questions--then Sue needs 4 more correct answers or 24, 24 out of 40 is 60%.

But again, the conditions state '10% or more higher than Bob's'. That's what makes the difference. That's why the answer, the only answer, is 55%.

Sometimes converting language to a mathematical formula is ambiguous. In this case it's not. It's just a little tricky.

Anyone who still thinks it's 60% won't get this one either:

The taco plate dinner at taco cabana is $10. They run a 10% off sale for a week. After the sale is over they raise the price 10%. How much does the taco plate dinner cost now?

If you said $10 you're wrong. The !0% off sale made the plate cost $9. When the price went up 10% it was 10% of the now $9 cost or 90 cents. So the plate now costs $9.90. The 10% increase is based on the $9 cost, not the original $10.


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#9
February 22, 2014 at 12:52:45
Ok, just for fun here's the original post. Is the OP asking for the conditional formatting to applied for the wrong amount? He not only mentions the 10% higher criteria but uses numbers also.

I have a score value in cell D20. I have a different score value in cell I20. I want cell I20 to turn green if that score value is 10% or more higher than the score value in D20. For example: D20 score is 69%. If the score in I20 is 79% or higher, I need it to turn green. I know I need the conditional formatting, but I can't figure it out. Thanks

What say ye?


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#10
February 22, 2014 at 14:18:09
Math, like dos syntax, is exact. Obviously the OP's intent at first was not clearly stated but his example made it clear what he wanted.

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#11
February 22, 2014 at 14:26:59
I happened to get 55% before reading the responses (same approach with #9) but can now see the possibility for the 60% version. Maybe it is just how it happens to grab you initially and, yes, the question is ambiguous.

I think there is a way that finance types handle this sort of thing for inflation and interest rate increases but I'm not certain I've recalled it properly. It's along the lines of "an increase of half of one percent", rather than saying an "increase of half a percent".

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#12
February 22, 2014 at 15:39:24
I figured it was for grading, so that a teacher could see if there was a total percentage change.

::mike


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#13
February 22, 2014 at 22:16:47
✔ Best Answer
I think I was a bit dismissive of the 60 percenters. When using exact scores instead of percentages in my # 8 there really is no way to get anything but 55%. After that I could see that when only using percentages, as the problem was originally stated, it's somewhat murky. You can't be sure if the '10% more' means
50% + 10% or 50% + 50% x 10%. Just another example of the difficulty of converting language to math. So I apologize for what I was thinking about your early childhood education. . .

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#14
February 23, 2014 at 07:41:12
I'm pretty sure that your mostly accurate on my early childhood math education, math was one of the reasons I was unable to proceed down the computer science degree path. Fancy math and I just don't agree.

::mike


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#15
February 23, 2014 at 14:29:00
I didn't care for it much either until 8th grade. I could do it OK and it never was hard but I had no interest in it. Then I had a teacher who made it interesting. After that it became fun.

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#16
February 23, 2014 at 14:35:34
Like many things math becomes fun when you first find a real use for it. My first stepping stone is when I wanted to use it to design filters to make a ceramic "gramophone pickup head" have characteristics which were much more like a magnetic type. In those dim and distant days magnetic was the tops.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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