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How did the Nashville bomber bring down service in other sta

Microsoft Windows 7 home premium
December 28, 2020 at 20:59:46
Specs: Windows 10, i7 9700K
So, I went to school for IT.  101 level networking courses, they teach you about different network topologies.  Star, ring, point to point, and mesh.  Mesh networks are the most expensive and used for cores of major networks.  A full mesh network removes a single point of failure for a network.  If there is any company in the world that has the resources and ability to create a mesh network, it would be at&t.  I can understand taking out nashville, all customers in the Nashville area would be affected.  But, for other states surrounding Nashville, there should've been many other paths for the data to travel.  Each route would have a cost.  The routes follow the least cost.  But, when a router goes down or a circuit goes down, the cost to the circuit skyrockets so then traffic automatically takes a different route.  (I also took ccna and ccnp classes in college but now I'm a server guy.)  But, how could've att been so careless to build their network with a single point of failure, especially when first responders are using it?  

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#1
December 29, 2020 at 01:27:28
Losing a hub is quite different from losing a link between hubs.
The smaller the number of hubs, and the greater the number
of links connected to a hub, the greater the impact of disabling
the hub.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#2
December 29, 2020 at 07:34:26
But there should be many different hubs it should be able to go through to get to all the other cities. A true mesh network, every endpoint has a direct connection to every other end point. There are multiple paths the data can take to get from point a to point z. If one link goes down, no matter if it's the circuit or the router goes offline, the cost of that link is infinitely high, so the system takes the next least cost route and routes around the failed router.

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#3
December 29, 2020 at 07:41:48
When I was taking my CCNP classes, the topic did come up when we were discussing I think BGP, we brought discussed the case scenario of a data center going completely offline and making sure our network would be completely uninterrupted for all sites except the site that went offline.

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#4
December 29, 2020 at 07:45:51

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#5
December 29, 2020 at 07:46:29
I think at&t was being cheap and lazy and this attack exposed their carelessness.

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#6
December 29, 2020 at 09:16:16
We still don't know the whole story or motive, but the bomber was an IT guy. The investigators are beginning to think AT&T was the target & that the bomber was a conspiracy theorist who believed 5G is dangerous. Maybe because of his IT knowledge he knew that blowing up the Nashville hub would disrupt more than just the service in Nashville?

One thing's for sure, he had himself a pretty online girlfriend, whether she knew it or not.
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/xcKlrr1lbc0/...

The bomber kind of reminds me of Eddie Money, except he only had one ticket to paradise.
https://static01.nyt.com/images/201...

message edited by riider


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#7
December 29, 2020 at 10:11:59
It's interesting that he would've known that when AT&T didn't even know that. If AT&T knew that data center was a single point of failure for their network, then it does not look too good on AT&T. No matter how you look at it, this makes AT&Ts reliability look terrible. No service that handles first responders should have any single points of failures. Either they didn't know and now they're incompetent or they did know and were careless. AT&T I'm sure has some pretty smart network engineers. How did they not pose this as a possibility to bring their network down? How many other single point of failures exist in AT&Ts network? Does Verizon have similar single points of failures in their network?

message edited by dorlow


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#8
December 29, 2020 at 10:24:01
Also the police's backup communications system didn't work which makes nashvilles police force look bad. They should be checking it periodically. All the systems I'm responsible to administer has backup plans for when it fails and backups. But, you can't just set it up and forget it, you need to practice it and verify your backup plan works periodically, that your backup circuits work. Backup power works, and your data backups are reliable by doing random test restores.

I used to be a cerner emr engineer. I toured cerners data center. They had redundant power from two different power companies, redundant data circuits from two different ISPs. Then they had a second data center. With the same redundancy and the second data center was built into a side of a mountain to make sure it could withstand tornados (seeing they're in the tornado belt.) They have bullet proof glass and no drop ceilings or floors to follow good security practices. Their data center is an example how to make a reliable data center.

And then, if all of that fails, each hospital has an offline copy or everyone's medical records that are copied down periodically during the day, so even if a hospitals circuit dies, they can still work.

message edited by dorlow


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#9
December 29, 2020 at 10:25:05
"...bomber kind of reminds me of Eddie Money, except he only had one ticket to paradise."

From my standpoint, he got on the train heading the wrong direction...IMHO.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#10
December 29, 2020 at 19:40:37
Could be the suits (accountants) at AT&T were playing the risk/ratio game - (allegedly) popular with the airlines and probably others too - where the cost of redundant/backup systems is weighed against possible loss of income or law suits due to system failures. Whichever is deemed cheapest path, that one gets the go ahead. Factor in the anticipated likelihood, frequency, of any such failure, and again if the numbers come out in favour of do nothing... that’s the way it goes.

One only has to look at the Max737 fiasco to an example of it in a very unfortunate way. And there have been examples of parallel situations over the last 60+ years in the automotive industry too.


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