How can this be possible or is it fake

Custom / CUSTOM
May 2, 2011 at 06:26:41
Specs: Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate, 2 GHz / 2047 MB
How can this be possible or is it fake
video is second pic down
http://www.geekologie.com/2008/01/m...

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#1
May 2, 2011 at 07:03:42
As far as I Know at the dawn of digital computers eve the first magnetic core memory banks were sealed in cans filled with mineral oil. IBM 7090/94 mainframes in early sixties operated their core memory banks that way for cooling purpose. So why not?

Notice that technology was then superseded by System 360 air cooled core memory to avoid maintenance issues due to mineral oil.


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#2
May 2, 2011 at 07:23:48
Mineral oil:
Does not conduct electricity
Does conduct heat
Boils between 260 - 330C
Resists corrosion, with additives
Is cheap

I don't know how corrosive off the shelf mineral oil is, but that wouldn't affect the short-term operation of the build. It also tends to be heavy (because it's filled with mineral oil), and it can leak. Those are the only downsides I can think of off-hand.

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#3
May 2, 2011 at 08:08:33
Thanks that's news to me I would have thought electrics and fans would not work with any liquid.

just found this link for version 3 very interesting but there no way a system like that would last - is there?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUBv...


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#4
May 2, 2011 at 09:42:37
Yeah, liquids are generally superior to air when it comes to cooling, thanks to their increased density. We use air instead because no one cares if your PC is leaking air. We don't use water, because it's fairly corrosive. Tap water's worse because it might cause shorts, and it's still corrosive.

Personally, I'd avoid PC cooling fans; they're designed to push "fluids" with the density of air, not mineral oil. If that doesn't provide satisfactory circulation, I'd try fans with a stronger motor and more propeller shaped blades, or a pump. Whichever happened to be cheaper / easier.

EDIT: Probably a pump, so I could easily push the oil through a radiator.

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#5
May 2, 2011 at 10:44:01
I remember hearing and reading about some super computer maybe even at Nasa ( I say Nasa because as a kid I was all into it) that a portion of it was submerced in a mineral oil solution for cooling and had to be monitored. I was like 9 or 10 maybe. I have done a little bit of liquid cooling myself but nothing like that where everything was exposed to the liquid. Mainly just cpu and harddrive coolers. And yes I did use a pump and radiator system. I really don't think I'll be running out to by an aquarium and mineral oil anytime soon though. The temps it showed in the video are hirgher than I get now with air.

Likely


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#6
May 2, 2011 at 12:10:18

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#7
May 2, 2011 at 13:53:18
I believe that a liquid cooled (submerged) motherboard was shown at COMDEX in the 1980's. Used a freon or halon type of liquid.

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#8
May 2, 2011 at 16:59:51
I get the cooling part its just the mobo dipped in the liquid that puts me off
Also the cooling i would normally see is self contained not just tossed in a fish tank lol

Also when looking at the link mmcconaghy posted lead me to some great videos of other super computers - very interesting indeed


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#9
May 3, 2011 at 01:40:57
@ wizard-fred A friend experimented with a refrigerant system for cooling a cpu basically just running refrigerant tubing through a heatsink much like a refrigerator freezer. He never could get it right though. He found it is possible to get the cpu too cold and from time to time got frost. I think he gave up not sure. Last time I saw him he was trying to build his own water cooler but kept getting leaks.

Likely


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#10
May 3, 2011 at 02:40:06
likely - this wasn't a refrigerant system. Was in aquarium-like glass container with motherboard, cpu, cards covered. Maybe it was an early vapor phase system,

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