Solved Hear about Google Helpouts?

Standbyit / Custom - asus p8z68-v/gen...
August 21, 2013 at 15:42:18
Specs: Windows 8 Pro, 3.401 GHz Corei7 3rd Gen / 8159 MB
"Have you ever been stumped by a problem that's clearly outside your wheelhouse? Perhaps you've even fantasized about being able to just dial up an expert to pick their big meaty brain about the problem. That's exactly what Google has just announced with Helpouts."

http://www.androidpolice.com/2013/0...

Does anyone have an account? Looking pretty cool and a great idea on Google's part (I think).

Just requested a activation code.

https://helpouts.google.com/welcome
www.standby-it.com

message edited by jpag3074


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✔ Best Answer
August 27, 2013 at 18:58:11
"Rather depends on whether you trust Google with anything (except, maybe, their search engine)."

Good point Derek, and I'm not sure about their search-engine, either...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."



#1
August 21, 2013 at 16:08:08
Rather depends on whether you trust Google with anything (except, maybe, their search engine).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
August 22, 2013 at 06:49:09
It's a paid service that reminds me of the app store model. Independents offer their time and expertise. The client pays them though Google. Google takes a flat 20%, and gives the independent the rest.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#3
August 22, 2013 at 12:54:08
Looks pretty cool! I've also requested a code.

Socially, it looks like an interesting experiment. It's going to be tough to charge users for help when there's so much help available on the internet already - but I'm sure Google has already thought of that.


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#4
August 22, 2013 at 13:02:57
It's going to be tough to charge users for help when there's so much help available on the internet already - but I'm sure Google has already thought of that.

Not to be too cynical Joe but, considering today's "entitled generation" who seem unable to do the simplest things............like search google or the yellow pages for themselves..........I'm sure google will make a ton of money off these inept, barely literate clods who can't think for themselves..............

I can't see giving google money to help me connect with a professional....but I can see me using google search to do find one and then make a phone call...I have to wonder, what is so hard about that???

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
August 22, 2013 at 13:19:25
Lol curt.. Great point and agreed.

I'll use it when it comes to various issues (hvac for example) around my house or DIY stuff that I've never done and researched what I feel I need to next. Nice to pay someone small fee to verify what you want to do, along g with getting some hints and pointers along the way.

Soon enough there will be Google cash, it'll run the world. :)

www.standby-it.com


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#6
August 23, 2013 at 07:52:51
Dude, unless you're balancing the air system in a big building there's not much to know about HVAC. I know, I did a lot of commercial HVAC back in the 80's. Sure, making the duct requires knowledge and a certain amount of skill in geometry as well as experience on a break and shear. But you're not going to make your own duct if you need some. You're going to order it from a place that makes it for you.

As far as HVAC goes in the home goes, you tell me what you're doing and I'll tell you what you need to know and you send me the 20% you were going to give google and pocket the other 80% to put towards whatever it is you're doing. :)

We renovated a bathroom this past spring. To do what we wanted a section of wall had to be moved. The new wall and soaker tub had to be framed in. The plumbing for tub and toilet had to be changed. Then after all that was done, it had to be finished, tiled, the vanity and sink put in, toilet installed etc etc etc.

Know what I did. I hired a professional contractor. We discussed the job and what the wife and I wanted (fee for consultation included in overall cost) and he did the job. I don't do tiles. I'm not a framer. I am definitely not touching plumbing because these are things I don't know a lot about and rather than stumble through it myself and make mistakes, I contracted a professional to do it for me.

I just don't get this idea of paying google to hook me up with a professional when I can search one and call him directly without the middle man.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
August 26, 2013 at 01:09:31
No, i just heard now. but looks cool!

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#8
August 27, 2013 at 13:21:37
Curt R, your making the option to abuse the Select as Best Answer awfully tempting...

::mike


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#9
August 27, 2013 at 13:51:17
Google Helpouts sounds like another gizmo that Google can use to help themselves to your private info and make themselves some nice big bucks. Remember that this is the outfit that "accidently" collected data on unsecured networks when taking photos at street view for their maps. I might be a bit dozy but I find it very hard to imagine how such an accident could happen.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#10
August 27, 2013 at 13:55:19
I'll accept that was an accident, because they're the ones who announced it. If they had intended to do so, they probably wouldn't have said anything.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#11
August 27, 2013 at 14:15:44
Re #10.

You put a camera on top of a car and take pictures of streets. How in heck can that process possibly collect unsecured network information by accident?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
August 27, 2013 at 14:40:51
It's a GPS augmentation trick. The layman's explanation goes like this: If you know the wireless networks "Starbucks #3,634" and "Starbucks #58" can only be seen on the corner of 5th and Broad, then if you see "Starbucks #3,634" and "Starbucks #58", you know you're at 5th and Broad, even if you can't read the road signs. This gets important in city environments, where WiFi density is high and the GPS signals are terrible.

So Google was looking for the SIDs and assigning GPS data while they're driving around. The problem was they were recording everything going over the air, not just the SIDs. Apparently both were options in whatever sniffing software they were using. They reported the unencrypted data, because it was unencrypted.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#13
August 27, 2013 at 15:33:13
Re #12

Good explanation - thanks. Having read it I now wonder why GPS didn't even enter my thick head.

There are many other reasons I'm no fan of Google but I guess they are an aside to the original question so I'll call a halt at that.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#14
August 27, 2013 at 18:58:11
✔ Best Answer
"Rather depends on whether you trust Google with anything (except, maybe, their search engine)."

Good point Derek, and I'm not sure about their search-engine, either...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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