Solved Full Stereo maintenance Instructions...

October 11, 2012 at 23:04:26
Specs: Windows 7/Dual XP, ?/3gig
A friend of mine returned from a trip to China where he bought a stereo system which met his requirements ideally. Fortunately he is well versed in this type of equipment but he thought it advisable to check the User Instruction sheet "just in case". Had he been a first time user how would he have managed to decipher this: (Extract from the instructions)

Maintenance

l. lf when the organism is very dirty, please soak the branch water or the suds and wringing out with the soft cloth, Then Polish . it plans and use chemistry wash pharmaceutical read and have something to do and prove at first. Cut Don't use the alcohol or it then water,etc. to clean the chassis!
2. After using for relatively long time, this machine laser lens may become dirty , thus cause and put The sound stops at the time of the sound. Brush and wipe gently with scene with camera at this moment The dust, then blow with the hair-dryer. Or is signed and dipped in a few with a clean cotton Absolute alcohol polish laser lens, sign and it dries to be lens ‘with clean cottons and then Can.
3.Take disc touch data when the one with hand (silver plain noodleses), at one while showing The sound stops.
4. lf disc when being very dirty, polish clean with the soft wet cloth the slices of data, Then Dry. Be careful, to comply with the centre to other rectilinear motion while polishing , but don't rotate Disc slice.
5. Don't write or label on disc slice:

The rest of the instructions are just as descriptive!


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✔ Best Answer
October 12, 2012 at 13:18:57
Wonder why they never try out instructions on a proper English speaking person before printing them. Over confident with their language skills maybe?

That would however spoil the fun.

I once had car (of sorts) called a Wartburg - strange East German 2 stroke. Here are just three things I recall from the handbook:

1. References to the "assistant driver".

2. Strange comment that started with "When spraying the engine with oil....."

3. During run-in "play somewhat with the accelerator pedal".



#1
October 12, 2012 at 01:31:23
Hilarious - the company evidently engaged a crap translator. I would never buy electrical stuff abroad if it required reading the instructions.

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#2
October 12, 2012 at 03:03:30
Probably did something like a Google Translate. Never was very impressed with that...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#3
October 12, 2012 at 06:07:48
T-R-A

Exactly what I was thinking.......LOL

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
October 12, 2012 at 06:42:32
I always find it funny when you translate using google, and then translate back. Its enlightening.

:: mike


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#5
October 12, 2012 at 13:18:57
✔ Best Answer
Wonder why they never try out instructions on a proper English speaking person before printing them. Over confident with their language skills maybe?

That would however spoil the fun.

I once had car (of sorts) called a Wartburg - strange East German 2 stroke. Here are just three things I recall from the handbook:

1. References to the "assistant driver".

2. Strange comment that started with "When spraying the engine with oil....."

3. During run-in "play somewhat with the accelerator pedal".


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#6
October 14, 2012 at 05:56:28
"I once had car (of sorts) called a Wartburg..."

Wow. Didn't realize they allowed vehicles outside of the GDR (or other Soviet-block countries) before the breakup.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#7
October 14, 2012 at 09:17:14
Re#6

I'm from UK. Yeah, they in those days they let them in here. They were like a poshed up Trabant.

It had inbuilt tailgater protection, all you had to do is run it stop/start around town for about 3 weeks so that the oil built up in the manifold and exhaust. You then ran it on the open road and clouds of blue smoke shot out of the back.

I had it for 9 years - kinda liked its weirdness, tho I accept it was anti-social. I always said that if you were not prepared to knock up pistons from drainpipes on the side of the road then you shouldn't have a Wartburg.

My wife reckons we never went out as much as we did when we had the Wartburg. The reason is that you had to travel miles to get spares for it. If necessary you could pull the engine out and pop it on a workbench single handed (I was stronger then).

3 cylinders, 3 coils, 3 sets if points. Rad at "back" of the engine compartment and door buttons that you pulled "up" to lock. Trunk (boot) could become a full 6 feet long with no lip, so it was great for loading up with washing machines etc.

The pull away was terrific but that's where it ended. You had to get a good run at hills on the highway otherwise you'd end up right down the gears.


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