Discuss: The Future of Electric Cars

Hewlett-packard / Hp pavilion g6 notebook p...
September 26, 2014 at 06:01:23
Specs: Windows 7, 1.4 GHz / 5610 MB
Hi all,

This week's poll question is about news that Tesla Motors has released an update for its Model S to make the car "smarter." Discuss here what you think the future of electric cars looks like, and, if you like, the poll results themselves.

Thanks,
Justin


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#1
September 26, 2014 at 06:53:07
I believe a serious development of electric cars is just a "must" since it is what our actual world lacks to resemble the environment sci-fi depicted in the past century (e.g. see flat panels, tablets and... women's mini skirts).

The target is not closer, decades away but ineluctable to fight urban pollution and to seriously restart US and European manufacturing industry. City cars may be the entry point.

The next question is: how to feed electric cars? Surely not by fossil fuel generated electric power. So we will have to hope in sun, wind or... nuclear power by fission or fusion.


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#2
September 26, 2014 at 17:05:49
Until there is some sort of "revolution" in battery-capacity, charge-time, and replacement costs, there's little chance that the majority of people will voluntarily switch to electric any time soon. Most electric cars go 30-80 miles (yes, some a little further than that). Also, nobody wants to wait for 5-10 hours on a full charge before continuing their journey to wherever they're going. I drive over 100 miles/day to and from work, so there's nothing out there I'd even consider at this point. Also $5K+ every 30,000 to 40,000 miles for batteries just isn't something people can justify (which if accurate, would mean I'd have spent >$47K in batteries over the life of my '95 Saturn with 332,000 miles on it......i.e.---4 times the original cost of the car or more than double the price of gasoline that it's been in it). I won't even begin to discuss the need for 4WD in the area I live---since it would even make the argument to go electric even sillier....

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#3
September 27, 2014 at 03:06:39
YES, T-R-A, I agree with your accurate picture of the actual scenario of the limits plaguing electric cars: a "revolution" is indeed necessary to boost that market, but...

In the Twenties the rocket scientist Goddard was going to be phased out from the University where he teached Physics due to his experiments to build a vehicle that can fly to outer space. Today ISS is orbiting over our heads.

In the Fifties Wall Street believed never an exoteric device powered by thousand of tubes can have any useful application in business or real life. Today computers are everywhere.

Progress is a cocktail of science and dreams.


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#4
September 27, 2014 at 05:00:41
IVO,

I'm not saying that it will never happen, but there isn't enough economical, day-to-day, practical-use in the current market of electric cars today to make them appealing to the masses; nor is there likely to be any time in the foreseeable future for the electric car to take over the current beast we've dealt with for 100+ years now.

Since there's been few people who have current practical use for the international space station, I don't see how that argument applies. The revolution for space-bound craft didn't occur until after WWII, when powers from the US and USSR took the technology that Germany had developed for the V-2 rocket and applied it to strategic weapons.

As far as computers being available for the masses, that took its' own revolution(s) with the invention of the integrated-circuit by Jack Kilby in 1959 and then took until 1971 for Intel to see the use for it's own 4004 CPU (outside of a Busicom calculator).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#5
October 1, 2014 at 20:32:05
The move to electric cars is primarily due to emissions for gas and diesel powered vehicles. However, charging the batteries on an electric car uses AC current which is generated primarily by coal fired plants. This simply shifts the emissions from one source to another. The batteries are expensive and will be problematic to recycle.

Boon pickens had the right idea. Natural gas powered vehicles. The ONLY thing stopping this from happening is the distribution network necessary for mainstream use. Converting a gasoline engine to natural gas is easy and inexpensive to do. Less emissions than gasoline too. Also free us from importing so much oil.

My natural gas company has been powering much of their fleet with natural gas for years.


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#6
October 15, 2014 at 12:22:01
I agree with the majority, electric cars are not there yet simply because of capacity versus charging time and range. It seems like a nice dream, but the batteries can't recharge forever and then just about the entire car is useless. Here in the little tiny Netherlands they are experimenting with them and even here they come up short. Detachable batteries would solve the electric cars problem though. Load them at home, take along as many as you like and change them along the way, dump the ones that do not charge anymore, exchange empty ones for full ones at gas stations for the price of recharging.
Electric SCOOTERS however do work well here and are quickly becoming the inner city transport mode of choice. Life expectancy of a scooter is just about equal to those damn batteries anyway.

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