Discuss: Sony PlayStation Network

Hewlett-packard / Hp pavilion dv5 notebook...
April 29, 2011 at 06:14:03
Specs: Windows 7, 1.9 GHz / 3837 MB
Hi all,

This week's poll question is about the massive security breach and outage occurring on Sony's PlayStation Network. Discuss here what you think this means for cloud security, and, if you like, the poll results themselves.

Thanks!
Justin


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#1
April 29, 2011 at 20:57:38
A lock is great protection against an honest thief. No matter the type of lock there is a way to open it. If a thief wants to get passed it he or she will eventually find a way. This just shows that what is known as "security" in the computing world is nothing more than a dime store combination lock like most of us had on our gym lockers in school. Can I break in through these security "locks"? I wouldn't even know where to start but if for some reason I wanted what was on the other side I am sure I could at least find a way to learn. This from an untrainable set in his ways old fart. Just imagine if I had actual working knowledge of these types of things and a motive to use that knowledge.

"Discuss here what you think this means for cloud security" I thought it sucked before. this didn't help win me over to their side.

Likely


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#2
May 2, 2011 at 10:47:50
The problem with security is that it's easier to do something insecurely than securely. Installing a vault and making sure it's closed every night is a bigger hassle than having a large pile labeled "Money," but a bank that did the latter probably wouldn't get my business. (There's, like, a good 60% chance I'd walk out. Honest!)

The problem with computer security is that we, as customers, can't do that quick visual inspection. Really, the closest would be an audit, and those things cost.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#3
May 2, 2011 at 11:57:41
Discuss here what you think this means for cloud security,

"Cloud security" is an oxymoron.

To me "secure" with reference to my data means nobody I don't want to access it is able to.

Putting your data on "the cloud" means giving any number of people you don't know access to your data. And I'm not even talking about hackers here.

I'll stick with my own security and keep my data at home where I can access it as easily as anybody else can access their data on "the cloud"

If you don't care, then by all means use the cloud but I can promise you I never will.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
May 2, 2011 at 12:32:43
I have not looked, and I am not going too because I am not interested, but I am betting that somewhere in the agreement that has to be acknowledged in order to store something on or in the cloud there is a statement that says they are not responsible for lost or stolen data. What does this say about security?

Likely


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#5
May 2, 2011 at 13:57:41
I am betting that somewhere in the agreement that has to be acknowledged in order to store something on or in the cloud there is a statement that says they are not responsible for lost or stolen data.

I'd wager you're completely correct on this. And with regard to what I was saying, all their employees have access to said data stored on their network in their servers.

I think back some years to a place I was working. I remember very clearly coming in from an out-call one day and the two 'junior' technicians we're huddled together over a laptop one was working on on the bench and laughing. When I asked what was going on, the one guy showed me. He had snooped on the hard drive of the laptop and found the owners stash of pictures of herself in the buff. I told them to knock it off and not to EVER let me find out they'd been snooping through other peoples data or I'd make sure they bounced twice when I tossed them out the door.

I doubt that stopped them, they most likely just made it a point to not let me know or do it whenever I was around.

Regardless, my point being, people being what they are, I don't trust most as far as I can throw them. I don't trust any stranger at all.........period.......but it's a safe bet anything you store on "the cloud" is going to be pawed through.

If it's personal and important, burn to DVD and store those offsite, like in a safety deposit box and maybe invest in a small NAS for at home. Do not trust "the cloud"

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
May 2, 2011 at 17:07:00
As said before nothing is ever 100% secure.
And don't ever believe people who say it is

Dont know if you guys are from the UK or US but here in the UK we have been told for years "its safe to use our credit cards online" and "our data is safe"

You just need to look at Sony and other sites that have been hacked recently and as for data its getting out left right and centre.


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#7
May 3, 2011 at 09:26:34
I told you folks a long time ago the cloud is not secure.

But would you listen? NO!!

Now I'm going shopping since I have 25 million cc numbers.

Old people don't need companionship. They need to be isolated and studied so it can be determined what nutrients they have that might be extracted for our personal use.

Homer Simpson


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#8
May 3, 2011 at 11:01:57
Dont know if you guys are from the UK or US but here in the UK we have been told for years "its safe to use our credit cards online" and "our data is safe"
In the US, this has been the story for years, but it's been slowly transitioning over to, "sucks to be you."

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