Discuss: Old Versions of Internet Explorer

Hewlett-packard / Hp pavilion g6 notebook p...
January 7, 2016 at 05:46:47
Specs: Windows 7, 1.4 GHz / 5610 MB
Hi all,

This week's poll question is about news that Microsoft will soon end support for older versions of Internet Explorer. Discuss here if you agree with this move, and, if you like, the poll results themselves.

Thanks,
Justin


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#1
January 7, 2016 at 06:01:56
Most of what MS do is for marketing reasons. However IE11 runs on Windows 7 onwards and for earlier systems there are several alternatives including Firefox and Chrome. On that basis I don't see it as much of a problem.

On XP it is safe enough to just use IE8 for what few updates come along (MSE and MRT definitions still arrive, as do those for MS Office Compatibility Packs).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
January 7, 2016 at 06:05:11
M$-land do seem very keen to "force" non win-10 users to move to win-10 equivalent.. Quite why - likely money is behind the move?

Quite likely many will simply resort to Firefox etc; and forego IEx and also "Edge" - the latter does appear to be a PIA for some users?


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#3
January 7, 2016 at 10:08:43
Ran into some "sillies" with Edge. One widely reported one is that if it is not maximized its window never turns up in the same place twice. Mine also flashes on and off at the home page at times. I tend to regard it as a "work in progress" rather than a finished product. Win 10 is a bit that way too IMO but luck seems to come into it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#4
January 7, 2016 at 11:48:17
It does not matter what we think. Microsoft made this decision 17 months ago, mostly to give the enterprise customers time to adjust and to stop using older versions of Internet Explorer. Other reasons for the change include: better security, less version fragmentation for Web app and site developers, and improved compatibility with third-party and Microsoft's own Web-based applications and services.

i_Xp/Vista/W7/W10 User


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#5
January 8, 2016 at 04:12:51
Honestly I feel that enterprise customers are most likely to fight the move to windows 10 and edge browser. They company I work for is still disagreeing with its required move to windows 7. Also ie 8,9 are supported in Web applications, while support for newer browsers are deemed unsecure.

::mike


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#6
January 8, 2016 at 22:02:52
"It does not matter what we think."

Actually, it does. There's a paradigm shift beginning that I noticed before leaving my previous job about a year ago. In the manufacturing world, companies are beginning to shift away from both IE/Edge and Windows in general. Two different manufacturers of equipment stated that they were moving away from Windows altogether (one to Linux, the other to an Android-based OS) and where I'm employed now, they did upgrade to Win10 on all machines. But changed browsers (to Chrome and/or Firefox) and moved e-mail away from Outlook to Thunderbird. Likely MS office will be gone before long as well (replaced by LibreOffice).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#7
January 9, 2016 at 09:13:03
I use several browsers but one thing I like about IE (which I don't think applies to any/many others, including Edge) is that you can very quickly put a shortcut onto the desktop. You do this by using IE at less than full screen, saving the shortcut to the favorites bar then just drag it onto the desktop. I use that frequently, for instance to file program details in with the file or download. Edge can't be used at less than full screen without it ending up in a different place each time you open it, something which should be "basic".

Another thing that IE can do is accept a program shortcut on the Favorites bar. Again something other browsers can't do.

Microsoft seem to be generally losing their understanding of practicality, often leaving me with the belief that nobody there actually uses an MS computer. They have a habit of removing useful features because they just don't understand why there were put there way back. Examples, dumping "hold shift key to browse a CD", adding "auto sort files" (with no opt out) which is horrendous if you do a lot of file handling, etc. I often resort to using third party utilities because they show much more common sense.

Most of the operating system improvements since XP have just been glitz. Maybe that is the operating system they should have stuck with, improved, and supported rather 10 which is currently less stable (well, at least the upgraded ones).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
January 9, 2016 at 10:28:23
One might be forgiven for thinking that M$ software developers don't actually communicate with the end users of the software from M$-land.

In just about every generation of Windows, and M$-Office useful features have been removed, or buried deep within (so as to render them almost unusable). Frequently when end users challenge the changes they are fobbed off/dismissed by M$-land; such changes being deemed very popular and requested, or the "missing" facility wasn't actually much used or required by end users... And there are other assorted "excuses" frequently offered too.

One that comes to mind is the removal of Outlook's email received/read by addressee bounce back message to sender... And in Word so many useful items are constantly relocated to wherever - and more than once...; often making them very much less user friendly.

Overall I suspect (like T-R-A) that more and more will move to Office Libre or similar; use Firefox or similar. Both being obviously increasingly less cluttered, easier to use - and with an apparent aim to be user-friendly.

IE's continual security issues do seem to be endless too; and the lack of constancy/compatibility across the web for many sites is a PIA. Which having sed.. Safari too suffers from this latter issue; and with current Mac OSX Safari is frequently slow(er) than say Firefox to load and in some cases may even fail to fully access a given website. Apple-land need to address this issue too; and similarly the ongoing (long time) issues with M$-Outlook and Mac Mail with pop3 and even IMAP accounts...

Apple-land are increasingly tending to the same attitude of M$-land when it comes to software issues... Perhaps summed up as "tough luck..., learn to live with it" - as we can't be bothered, and don't really care.


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#9
January 9, 2016 at 13:27:11
Anyone noticed that Microsoft websites are often more difficult than others to open with IE (not sure about Edge)? They often open better in other browsers. Most likely it is down to MS breaking their own website rules, with other browsers being more tolerant..

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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