Discuss: Europe's Data Protection Laws

Hewlett-packard / Hp pavilion g6 notebook p...
May 24, 2018 at 05:14:56
Specs: Windows 10, 1.4 GHz / 5610 MB
Hi all,

This week's poll question is about news that Europe's new data protection laws are now going into effect. Discuss here if you think these laws will help with protection for both Europeans and non-Europeans, and, if you like, the poll results themselves.

Thanks,
Justin


See More: Discuss: Europes Data Protection Laws

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
May 24, 2018 at 09:42:39
If they manage to reduce spam and endless unsolicited info. that will be a benefit to all. Likewise (in UK at least) the changes may reduce the humongous amount of small mail one receives from various organisms...

And if they reduce the practice of selling on personal info too then that will be a welcome effect.

message edited by trvlr


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
May 25, 2018 at 09:33:03
As per trvlr and bear in mind that junk mail and advertising are both prime sources of malware.

Many services are provided free because they can steal your data and focus advertising. Most major players (do I need name them?) were known to do this all along so it should not be a surprise to anyone. When the dust settles they will work out some way to wriggle out of it - wait and see.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
May 25, 2018 at 11:19:00
All I know is that over the past few days I have been getting emails and in-app pop-ups from all kinds of apps regarding their updated "privacy policy".

Some apps won't let me in until I acknowledge the new policy. They all sound nice and "safe". Yeah, right.

How To Post Data or Code ---> Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 30, 2018 at 07:17:50
Re My #2. I think I now know how they get round it. They bombard you with a whole stack of cookie choices which are designed to be as difficult and confusing as possible. The idea is that you give up and either say yes to everything or stop using the internet. Very neat.

It's all a load of old rubbish.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
May 30, 2018 at 08:13:37
Gimme back my good-old 1997 internet (pre-Google, YouTube, etc.) any day....

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
May 30, 2018 at 08:33:07
What's up with some US news sites (e.g The New York Daily News) that they can't manage to handle this and just block European viewers? Can't they afford decent programmers to write a system that obeys the laws.

The New York Times and the Washington Post (to name but just two of many examples) have no problem at all in dealing with European readers.


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
May 30, 2018 at 10:32:56
The problem is how personal nformation is (mis)handled, passed around etc. without consent of the subscriber; how various sites and organisations simply garner personal info and sell it on. Prior to this gnu act opt in/outs were fequently hidden, and the default was opt iin...

This problem, situation, is not just European based, it’s rampant in N. America and elsewhere too. Similarly with cell/mobile phone numbers too; the service providers share one’s number with all and sundry. Right now I have cell phone using a pay as you go SIM from one US service, and I get daIly calls fom Florida and Nevada to name two locations. The number has only been active about three weeks, and the calls started on day two...

re’ blocking European readers (if I interpret #6 correctly) why the need to block European readers? Surely the sources to block, or legally disallow to pass on personal data are the actual services and sites who do just that - garner data and trade it on...


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
May 30, 2018 at 11:19:18
The excuse seems to be that these news sites can't comply with European law. Which rather makes you wonder what data they are harvesting, and how they are using it, that makes them unable to comply with a fairly simple law. One that most other web sites have no problem with.

Rather than these news sites blocking certain users it would be more sensible for users to block certain news sites - those that feel they cannot comply with data protection laws.


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
May 30, 2018 at 13:12:47
Re #5. Yeah, highlight was to win Chucky Egg then you just sat back and counted your paper clips.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
May 30, 2018 at 13:21:46
@Derek:

Don't think Chucky Egg made it across the pond. I tended to prefer Elf Bowling and Punch Clock Panic (albeit both of those were post-2000 games).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Reply ↓  Report •

#11
May 30, 2018 at 13:42:47
re' #8 - now I follow the drift... Yup who gnows wot those sites are harvesting unbeknown to their clients/users..

re'#10 before my time I think.... I came onboard with pacman and possibly space invaders...


Reply ↓  Report •

#12
May 31, 2018 at 07:59:53
The other big one is cloud processing. If folk were asked if their data could be put on someone else's computer without any indication what computer or where, and maybe several, they might not have gone for it. Saying it is in the clouds in much nicer - even God like. Beware of marketing and remember that business is a legal scam (well, "probably" legal anyway).

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#13
May 31, 2018 at 09:25:00
- and beware the Ides of March, and things that go bump in the night...; and don’t put things under the bed at night as the “creatures” will take them...

The whole cloud system is seriously oversold at times; who really knows who has access to content, how “secure and safe” content really is.


Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question