Solved Dear Ben who has an email address at ukzn.ac.za

Hewlett-packard / Hp compaq dc7800p small f...
June 26, 2012 at 08:57:39
Specs: Windows Vista, 2.667 GHz / 8110 MB
First of all, I don't know what you're talking about. I am an active member of computing.net and answer a lot of questions, so maybe next time, reply to the post. If my responses aren't of the highest quality, that's because they're free. And lastly, unless you're offering to hire me for my support and consulting services, don't email me.

Your email to me:

The person who sugegsted logmein (or whatever that remote control service is) needs to read the question again that's a fine solution for ONE USER at a time. This person needs SEVEN users.Server 2003 is a little cheaper but you have to think about what you are doing with it and if there will be any growth. A terminal server should have LOTS of RAM I like as an absolute MINIMUM 512 MB per user prefer 1 GB per user. BUT 32 bit versions of Windows Server Standard only support 4 GB of RAM TOTAL. You could go with Enterprise but that's $3000+. So you're left with 64bit Versions of Windows which you need to check your software on MOST 32bit software will work fine under x64, but NOT ALL. (64 bit versions of Windows go at least to 32 GB of RAM Enterprise 64bit, I believe, goes to 2TB).As for parallels or another virtual platform, you still need windows licenses AND licenses for parallels In the end, for 7 users, the total cost may be SLIGHTLY more expensive for a Windows solution instead of parallels, but if you ever need to add more stations, it will rapidly become cheaper with Windows. The exception to this is if you end up with software that is not compatible with Windows Server 64bit versions. Then parallels will likely be worth the cost.By the way 2003 and 2008 have the same 4 GB limit for 32 bit versions of Server standard. I'd go wtih 2008, as it will last you longer and offers some advanced RDP (Terminal Services) features, like Terminal Services Gateway.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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✔ Best Answer
June 26, 2012 at 09:55:03
Can we turn this into a theoretical server building thread?

If you're building a Terminal Server (presumably as a part of some horrible prank on some customer), I'd imagine your first bottleneck would be RAM, followed by I/O, followed by CPU, followed by Network.

Disk I/O is easy; a fast RAID5 controller + disks would help mitigate the cost of drive access.

They have network cards with an internal network stack, so that'd give you your network performance and spare the CPU.

The CPU(s) will probably have 6 to 16 cores (combined), so everyone ends up with their own core, but as long as the work flow doesn't require heavy CPU use, it'd be easy to get away with one core per two to four employees, possibly more.

That leaves the RAM, and I'd assume you'd want as much as possible. I'd probably shoot for x64. If that wasn't an option, 32-bit with PAE would be the compromise. Drivers tend to have issues with PAE though, so your server (which everyone needs up to do work on) might BSOD more often than if it was x64. Make sure you hammer that server hard in the testing phase, and expect to spend time hunting down bad drivers and using the hardware manufacture's business support.

Mind you, it's been many years since I last designed a server, and never for a terminal server, but that's what's so fun with theoretical situations. I don't need to be exact, nor back up my "recommendations."

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way



#1
June 26, 2012 at 09:11:41
Sounds like a troll trying to be clever , why didn't you email that to him.

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#2
June 26, 2012 at 09:15:36
He sent it to the generic company email, not to my direct one. Didn't want to give him my direct email.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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#3
June 26, 2012 at 09:49:11
Hey,

Interesting... if it continues to happen, you can private message me the user's username. It should be in the e-mail he sent.

Thanks!
Justin


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Related Solutions

#4
June 26, 2012 at 09:55:03
✔ Best Answer
Can we turn this into a theoretical server building thread?

If you're building a Terminal Server (presumably as a part of some horrible prank on some customer), I'd imagine your first bottleneck would be RAM, followed by I/O, followed by CPU, followed by Network.

Disk I/O is easy; a fast RAID5 controller + disks would help mitigate the cost of drive access.

They have network cards with an internal network stack, so that'd give you your network performance and spare the CPU.

The CPU(s) will probably have 6 to 16 cores (combined), so everyone ends up with their own core, but as long as the work flow doesn't require heavy CPU use, it'd be easy to get away with one core per two to four employees, possibly more.

That leaves the RAM, and I'd assume you'd want as much as possible. I'd probably shoot for x64. If that wasn't an option, 32-bit with PAE would be the compromise. Drivers tend to have issues with PAE though, so your server (which everyone needs up to do work on) might BSOD more often than if it was x64. Make sure you hammer that server hard in the testing phase, and expect to spend time hunting down bad drivers and using the hardware manufacture's business support.

Mind you, it's been many years since I last designed a server, and never for a terminal server, but that's what's so fun with theoretical situations. I don't need to be exact, nor back up my "recommendations."

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#5
June 26, 2012 at 10:10:58
As far as building a TS, it's all about what you do with it. RAM is typically the biggest constraint. Hard disk speed usually isn't even a factor. People remote into a TS to access files that are stored on other servers. TS is great for giving remote access to a line of business application, but needs to be carefully planned if you're going to use it as a full desktop replacement.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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