Bleak future outlook of Power Users

October 22, 2010 at 12:28:13
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...in my opinion, looks bleak. With the recent emphasis (bordering on obsession) with cloud computing, content-consumption-only cell phone computing, touch interfaces and the slow, painful, death of traditional operating systems, I just can't see where the power user would fit into this future. By "power user", I'm referring to anyone who uses their computer for tasks beyond internet/email/word-processing, frequently creates content and enjoys pushing their computer to its limits for whatever purpose they deem necessary (think virtualization, setting up a web server, programming...). Am I the only one who's a little scared of this future? Any thoughts?

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#1
October 23, 2010 at 01:36:06
There will always be a small number of 'power' users. Most users don't even utilize 25% of their software. They use just enough to get the job done.

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#2
October 23, 2010 at 06:19:55
...in my opinion, looks bleak. With the recent emphasis (bordering on obsession) with cloud computing, content-consumption-only cell phone computing, touch interfaces and the slow, painful, death of traditional operating systems

You remind me of Chicken Little running around crying "The sky is falling"

I think you're worrying over nothing. There is a large pool of people out there who use their PC's for things other than just surfing and doing email.

Gamers are a prime example.

You can't play the most recent iteration of COD or MOHAA or World of Warcraft on your cell phone. You never will be able to.

As to the slow, painful, death of traditional operating systems I think the fact that Windows 7 was just released and the continued research and developement MS has going on makes this a false statement. Also, all the Linux and UNIX folks are still working on bettering their operating systems. Heck, even Mac is.

The internet and computing in general, like everything else in this world, change over time. It wasn't all that long ago we were using mainframes and dumb terminals (oops, excuse me, I AM Canadian so I guess I really should be more policitically correct and say "non-intelligent terminals")

If change scares you, you may want to opt out now since it never stops. Change isn't necessarily a bad thing. In fact, in most cases, it's a good thing.

You know, considering you're a bit of a "doomsayer" I'm surprised you're not more concerned that the worlds going to end (again) in 2012.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
October 23, 2010 at 07:46:36
Don't be so pessimistic about the future. I seriously think you really do need to read THIS while enjoying your morning cup of coffee.

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#4
October 24, 2010 at 12:54:27
I have had a cell phone for over 20 years, yet I use it for nothing more than phone calls. I do not text, or use any form of instant messaging. I do use email quite a bit. I know lots of folks like myself. My current phone is internet and blue tooth capable but as I stated, I don't partake of these features.

I am on my desktop a lot. I am not even considering cloud computing.


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#5
October 24, 2010 at 14:55:30
I'm with OtheHill. I use my phone to make calls. I've always tried to keep it simple. I also use email a lot and am on my desktop every day. I can also build a house, plant a garden and fix my car. You can't do that with an app. I love technology, but keep it in balance.

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