Solved What is tbe best security protection for windows XP3

November 2, 2017 at 06:59:45
Specs: Windows XP3, P4 2.6GHZ/PC3200 1.5gig
Hi,
We have a system running XP3 and don't really want to upgrade. What is the best security package we can get (free or not)? We're mostly interested in protecting our financial information. I was looking at these in Walmart yesterday, and it looks like they have to be renewed every year; in which case it might be better to upgrade to Windows 10 ..... or not?
Thanks,
.... john

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✔ Best Answer
November 2, 2017 at 13:29:56
The problem with XP is that it's a major security risk due to lack of updates & security patches. IE8 should NOT be used for web browsing & all the other browsers - Chrome, Firefox, Opera, etc - have dropped support for XP. Any of them will be safer than IE8, but as time goes on, they will become less & less secure.

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/k...
https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201...
http://windowsreport.com/windows-xp...

Same goes for AV software. Virtually all software developers have dropped support for XP. If you can't afford a new (or newer PC), I suggest you consider switching the OS to Linux.



#1
November 2, 2017 at 07:16:16
There are several generally recommended here; bitdefender, comodo being two...

https://www.bitdefender.com/support...

https://www.comodo.com/home/interne...

There are others too, e.g. - avg, avast, kaspersky...; and most have both freebie versions and paid for...

Avoid Norton and McAfee as both are resource hoggers; the assorted freebies will likely do all you need?

Also steer away from IE and go for perhaps Firefox...


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#2
November 2, 2017 at 11:47:28
Hi trvir,
Thanks for you reply.
Do you have any thoughts about whether a good security package will provide close to the same protection as upgrading the OS?
..... john

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#3
November 2, 2017 at 13:05:14
xp was (still is) for many a decent operating system, once the usual MS bugs were ironed out.

It's current weakness is of course IE, as more recent versions of IE won't work with xp; hence the usual shift to Firefox...

If I was considering an upgrade from xp I'd kikely go to win-t7; avoiding win-8x... And with a system that was xp originally win-10 would more than likely be not viable. And even if it was, with an older system I wouldn't go there.

Personally I'd likely get a decent security/anti-viripus utility and stay with xp; unless win-7 was a confortable and viable option. Any upgrade would requirea checks with relevant computer support site re' compatibilty - drivers etc. - first.

Hang about here though for a while as many others will likely offer their savvy and sage thoughts too.

Also I would ensure any critcal data is safely duplicated off the system entirely; preferably on two types of storage, or two of the same kind. If pennies allowed I'd havean NAS - mirrored system as that storage; and another separate hard drive as backup for the NAS, I have that latter arrangent.

message edited by trvlr


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#4
November 2, 2017 at 13:29:56
✔ Best Answer
The problem with XP is that it's a major security risk due to lack of updates & security patches. IE8 should NOT be used for web browsing & all the other browsers - Chrome, Firefox, Opera, etc - have dropped support for XP. Any of them will be safer than IE8, but as time goes on, they will become less & less secure.

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/k...
https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201...
http://windowsreport.com/windows-xp...

Same goes for AV software. Virtually all software developers have dropped support for XP. If you can't afford a new (or newer PC), I suggest you consider switching the OS to Linux.


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#5
November 2, 2017 at 16:16:52
riider's comments are well worth considering - if one takes in that support for XP is slowly degrading... XP would be fine on a system that didn't go online...

Certainly a Linux variant might be viable, as long as you are able to get across its way of doing things; and also have the necessary apps to access/run your current fiscal stuff?

I have a vintage 2005 Aspire 1690 series which came with XP. It's been totally cleaned out and re-installed a few times; going up from Home to Pro in the process. It never goes on-line and is useful for one or two occasions when I need to run a utility (usually dvd related) which isn't around anymore for later OS.

I may yet make it dual boot too with a Linux variant.


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#6
November 2, 2017 at 16:35:48
Thanks trvir/riider,
I have considered going to windows 7. My own computers runs it. And I would give it to my wife; but it refuses to update. I have tried everything. It was given to me, so I have no installation disk.
My wife likes XP, so Windows 7 is a good idea; but I hear that it will also be obsolete in a couple of years That's why I suggest Windows 10. I know she will not want Linux ..... it's too different from what she knows.
Neither of us have used IE for years. I use SeaMonkey and she uses Firefox. But she looks after the finances and is concerned about Windows XP's security. Other than that, we we don't really care. I keep backup drives of both of our systems, and haven't had an attack that I couldn't fix by simply popping in the back up, cloning it, and Bob's your uncle.
...... john

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#7
November 2, 2017 at 17:12:27
What happens whenyou try to update; and do you mean XP updates, or updating XP to win-7?

Also you could (if there's enough space on the hard drive) make a dual boot XP/win-7...?

message edited by trvlr


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#8
November 2, 2017 at 17:52:49
"I know she will not want Linux ..... it's too different from what she knows"

Actually, it's not, especially if "looking after the finances" means online banking & paying bills by using a browser rather than using special software. There are several Linux versions that are very Windows-like & run well on old low spec PCs. Mint & Zorin are two I recommend checking out.

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?di...

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?di...


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#9
November 2, 2017 at 19:06:08
You could always still use XP and use a Live Linux CD when such things as banking, etc were needed. When you're done, just shut down and remove the disc and reboot back into XP as needed...

http://www.livecdlist.com

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#10
November 3, 2017 at 08:35:06
Hi trvir,
No, I mean updating Windows 7 to the latest security fixes, etc. It just won't do it. I assume because it's not being used at the same location it was originally installed at. I have no idea. I've tried every recommendation that the entire world can offer, but it just refuses to install the updates. It seems to install them, but on rebooting it says that it's reverting to the original configuration, i.e. no updates. If I could update Windows 7, I would simply hand over the Windows 7 computer to my wife for her financial stuff.
..... john
P.S. No we have my wife's XPSP3 computer completely updated.

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#11
November 3, 2017 at 08:44:51
Hi riider,
O.K. Thanks. I'll check those out. I guess the real burning question is ... which will provide better security.
1. Updating to another OS ..... i.e. Linux, Windows 10, Windows 7
2. Installing a good security package on Windows XP.
Obviously, both would be ideal.
As I mentioned before, I saw several packages in Walmart (for under $100) that will run on XP. I've heard, anecdotally that Kaspersky is quite good.
.... john
P.S. Yes, looking after the finances is exactly as you described it.

message edited by shakushinnen


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#12
November 3, 2017 at 08:50:53
Hi T-R-A,
That's an interesting idea. So, you would boot into the Linux DVD, go to the sites you wanted to access, do your thing, then reboot into XP?
.... john

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#13
November 3, 2017 at 09:51:11
It is by no means certain that Win 10 will run satisfactorily on it due to your computer specification and availability of suitable Win 10 drivers.

Spending money on an AV for XP seems dubious. Bitdefender freebie should run on it but I heard (some time ago) that it slows down XP. You could always try it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#14
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#15
November 3, 2017 at 17:13:00
"So, you would boot into the Linux DVD, go to the sites you wanted to access, do your thing, then reboot into XP?"

Precisely. It works on an older machine that I have (I use Knoppix). When I'm done, I just reboot and back to WinXP (I still have browsers on XP, just a little leery about using them on my financial sites)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#16
November 3, 2017 at 19:26:44
Hi Derek,
I tried Bitdefender, but for some reason it wouldn't run. However, that was before I upgraded to SP3. Maybe I'll try it again.
Thanks,
..... john

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#17
November 3, 2017 at 19:29:48
Hi T-R-A,
Is Knoppix a flavour of Linux?
..... john

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#18
November 3, 2017 at 19:39:24
Hi JohnW,
I use Malwarebytes free, have been for years. I like it very much; but it's after the fact. I would like something that will prevent problems, not just clean up afterwards. I will check out Baidu. Does it prevent attacks?
.... john

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#19
November 3, 2017 at 19:56:13
"Is Knoppix a flavour of Linux?"

You bet....

http://knopper.net/knoppix/index-en...

The latest version is 8.1 (and the full release requires a DVD-drive); I use an older release (6.2-CD Version).

More info:

https://distrowatch.com/table.php?d...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#20
November 3, 2017 at 20:12:04
"Does it prevent attacks?"
I wouldn't use it if it didn't, but keep in mind, nothing is perfect, it is up to the user to be vigilant.

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#21
November 4, 2017 at 06:43:48
Hi JohnW,
Alright. So, Malwarebytes and Baidu is basically what you use. Did I miss anything?
..... john

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#22
November 4, 2017 at 06:51:44
Hi T-R-A,
Yes. I think I'll give this a try. It's probably a good tool to have as a backup system, even if I don't use it ..... just in case. So, I download the iso, burn it to the DVD/CD, and Bob's your uncle? Will it then work on any system, or do I need to burn it on each system I use?
..... john

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#23
November 4, 2017 at 08:28:26
"Will it then work on any system, or do I need to burn it on each system I use?"

You can use the disc across multiple machines. The advantage is that (with a little effort and maybe some trial-and-error) with earlier (pre-6.0) versions, you can save settings across those machines as well. The disadvantage is that older distros don't include newer applications (browsers, etc.):

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Knowi...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#24
November 4, 2017 at 08:37:34
So, the newer version (8, I think) does not allow configuring for, say, two machines? That's not a problem though. I can burn it as often as need be.
By the way, what brower(s) does it support.
....... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#25
November 4, 2017 at 10:39:31
"By the way, what brower(s) does it support."

"Support" would likely be a misnomer, since you'd be running a CD/DVD drive without persistence (i.e.---non-writable media). Should you be fortunate enough to be able to boot from flash-drive, the option to store files is there.

8.1 includes Chromium (essentially the Google Chrome browser), and Iceweasel (a derivative of Firefox).

http://knopper.net/knoppix/knoppix8...

If this is your first time with Linux, be prepared to spend some time learning your way around (the good thing about LiveCD/DVD's is that it's almost impossible to bork an existing OS on a machine) and you should be good to go...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#26
November 4, 2017 at 16:38:06
I wonder if you are clear about running Linux from a CD/DVD.

Firstly you don't just copy the download onto the CD/DVD. You have to use a program with a "burn an image (ISO)" feature to "create" it. Most burning programs have one but if not grab a copy of "CDBurnerXP" which is easy to use. It's here:
https://cdburnerxp.se/en/home

When the disc has been created you start the computer with it in the drive. If you computer boots straight into Windows as usual then you have to go into BIOS and set the CD/DVD drive ahead of your main drive.

I haven't read the links in every response in detail so I might have overlapped somewhere.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#27
November 4, 2017 at 17:30:59
Derek's correct, it'd be helpful to review the following to extract the .iso to a disc:

https://www.wikihow.com/Burn-ISO-Fi...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#28
November 4, 2017 at 19:20:26
"which will provide better security.
1. Updating to another OS ..... i.e. Linux, Windows 10, Windows 7
2. Installing a good security package on Windows XP"

WinXP will NEVER be secure again & Win7 or Win10 will never be as secure as Linux.

https://www.dailydot.com/debug/most...

https://antivirusinsider.com/most-s...


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#29
November 5, 2017 at 02:40:52
Many moons ago a Novell/MSCE instructor observed - to a mixd group of students, some of whom were from a nearby USAF base - that the only true secure computer was one which was: in a fully screened (Faraday cage) locked room; no external network connection to the computer, which was not powered up; and an armed guard with instructions to use deadly force to prevent any entrance unauthorised - or otherwise.

The only way to ensure that a redundant, or damaged/faulty drive, could not unlawfully (or otherwise) be accessed, or attempts made to recover its data, was to crush it; then burn it to a cinder; after-which grind the ashes to fine dust... To complete the process one then scattered the ashes over the open sea from a low flying hecilopter or similar...

Exits stage right for morning tea and toast...


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#30
November 5, 2017 at 06:58:48
And the moral of the story is, no OS is 100% secure. But running a 16 year old OS that hasn't received security patches from MS in over 3 years (except for the emergency "wannacry" patch earlier this year) & is also no longer being supported by browser or AV software developers is, to put in the nicest of terms, "unwise".

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#31
November 5, 2017 at 08:36:25
Yup!!! and yup again!!!

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#32
November 5, 2017 at 20:00:43
Thanks Derek,
I'm roughly familiar with the iso burning process.
..... john

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#33
November 5, 2017 at 20:04:11
Hi riider,
"WinXP will NEVER be secure again & Win7 or Win10 will never be as secure as Linux."
Thanks. That's one of the questions I wanted an answer to.
..... john

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#34
November 5, 2017 at 20:08:36
Yes trvir,
That's my understanding too of what a secure system would look like.
I'm not fool enough to think that any system will be inviolable.
But is suspect that the Linux DVD system is pretty good.
..... john

message edited by shakushinnen


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#35
November 5, 2017 at 20:16:00
Hi riider,
Yes, I understand. But, you know (and this is not to justify using Windows XP) ........ I have a suspicion that many of the ISPs, especially the big ones, weed out a lot of the s_ _t that at one time would have made it to our systems. I have no proof of this, but I have not had a major attack (that I know of ;-) ) in years.
.... john
P.S. "wannacry"?

message edited by shakushinnen


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#36
November 6, 2017 at 09:04:18
WannaCry was a malware infection that was released earlier this year. To help stop the spread of the infection, MS decided to push a security patch to XP users even though they had ended XP support in 2014.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/13/...



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#37
November 6, 2017 at 11:38:45
Hi riider,
Well, that's interesting, because we did get hit by a rasomware a few months ago. It ordered us to pay some bitcoin (I don't recall the amount), and locked up our pictures and documents, on the promise that if we didn't pay up, our computer would be disabled, or something of a sort, in 3 days. I ignored it, and when nothing else happened I simply replaced what it had disabled. It may still be on there, for all I know.
So, how do I get this patch? I didn't see it on the link you sent.
Thanks,
... john
P.S. I tried several of the rasomware fixes at the time, but none of them disabled it.

message edited by shakushinnen


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#38
November 6, 2017 at 12:21:59
Here's the patch:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/dow...
It was on XP Windows Update at the time.

However this is to prevent you getting it. It does not remove wannacry i if you already have it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#39
November 7, 2017 at 08:20:06
"I tried several of the rasomware fixes at the time, but none of them disabled it"

You can try the software that's generally recommended in these forums - AdwCleaner, JRT (Junkware Removal Tool), Malwarebytes, CCleaner, etc - but your best bet would be do to the cleaning from outside Windows by using a bootable rescue disc.

https://www.bitdefender.com/support...


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#40
November 7, 2017 at 13:29:21
Thanks Derek. I installed it, just in case.
Thanks riider. Yes, I tried everything I could think of at the time, maybe not Adw though. I even tried some of the free rasomware tools, but no love. I'll give Adw a go.
JohnW. I ran Baidu last night and it found over 30 Trojans. I'm a little surprised, since I ran Malwarebytes last week and it didn't find anything. Of course, she cold have picked up this stuff since then. Thanks,
..... john

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#41
November 7, 2017 at 14:19:01
There is malware and there are viruses/trojans. Not entirely clear myself re’ the distinction. However no single scanner will necessarily find everything at first go; and some scanners go after certain pests and some after others. Which is why one runs more than one type of scanner.

And some pests can only be dealt with via bootable OS/scanner; as those scanners can get at pests which hide within the system files of the resident /installed OS, and cannot be dealt with whilst that resident OS is active/booted up.

message edited by trvlr


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#42
November 7, 2017 at 16:42:55
"I ran Baidu last night and it found over 30 Trojans"

Baidu? It generally gets poor reviews & may even import malware. Get rid of it ASAP & replace it with Panda.

https://www.pandasecurity.com/usa/h...


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#43
November 8, 2017 at 01:16:08
Stick with XP Pro if that is what you have. I'd use XPlite Pro to get rid of anything not essential (IRC, Telnet, Remote crap, etc.). Depending on what you can live without, its possible to trim the bloatware down to about 900MB size, and ditch a whole lot of exploits with it. You need antivirus. I tried Panda Free but it was too unruly. I now use Avira Free (with BPGKiller). You need a software-based firewall. I tried Privatefirewall 7.0, but it was also too hard to deal with. I am using Agnitum Free Firewall until I can find something better. You need a hardware-based firewall having NAT & SPI. That is probably the most important. Aside from this, I'd suggest you look into Faronics Deep Freeze, NoVirusThanks EXE Radar Pro, and 1 Click & Lock...these three combined will stop any 'script kiddie', and probably many (if not most) black hatters. As for browsers, I went through so many I lost count. Those still on my PC are Comodo IceDragon, Whitehat Aviator, SRWare Iron, CyberDragon...and for general ease of use SeaMonkey 2.48. I would agree that learning Linux is a wise use of time, if for no other reason than as a 'Plan B'.


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#44
November 8, 2017 at 08:05:57
Seems like an awful lot of fuss to go thru to prolong the usefulness of an outdated/unsecure OS. And it sounds like the OP has already had several issues with viruses & malware so he's actually making a good case for those of us that say, it's time to move on from XP.

As for Linux, it always baffles me that people are so reluctant to try it. A lot of people use it everyday but have no idea that's what they're using. macOS, Android, iOS, ChromeOS, are all based on Unix/Linux as are the majority of the OSes used on smart TVs & other smart devices.

Hmmm, I wonder why these devices don't use Windows?


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#45
November 8, 2017 at 08:29:09
Linux is open source and (unless I'm mistaken) no license or whatever payable to M$-land?

I agree that it's a good system and with a little time, effort and perseverance, one can to grips with it...


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#46
November 9, 2017 at 19:29:53
Hi riider,
One the members here recommended Baidu.
..... john

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#47
November 9, 2017 at 19:33:27
Thanks Uitlander,
I'll check those out.
...... john

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#48
November 10, 2017 at 07:07:41
"One the members here recommended Baidu"

I realize that but did you do any research about it before downloading & installing it? It generally gets bad reviews, except on bogus review sites that were likely created by Baidu developers. PCmag.com gives it a rating of "dismal" on it's 1st review & then bumped it up to "fair" a year later. Other sites report it as a PUP (potentially unwanted program).

https://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,28...

https://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,28...

From the 2nd review: "Baidu made no noticeable improvement in protecting against malicious downloads or detecting phishing websites. Just because it's better doesn't mean it's actually good. If you're looking for free antivirus protection, our Editors' Choice Panda Free Antivirus 2015 should serve you well."

How about this? http://blog.talosintelligence.com/2...

message edited by riider


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#49
November 10, 2017 at 08:00:23
When it comes to anti-virus there are so many... and everyone has their preferred... Magazine reviews are useful - as long as one bears in mind their interests in advertisers/sponsors..; and these day possible threats of law suits if they pan anything too hard no doubt have their effects...

Also at any given time a utility may be top of the pile, and then be replaced there by another... Likewise no single utility can or will find everything at any time; rather that each will find as it does and catch up where required.

Some utilities initially are excellent and then seem to degrade; usual complaint being that they become resource demanding - they start to slow down a given system, and/or less effective overall. Others appear to be cumbersome re' updating...

There are many freebies about which are excellent - again with above paragraph in mind... And these are often all a domestic user requires...

The ratings table changes almost as quickly as the weather in some parts of the world... so one is left to anecdotal experiences, reviews, and advice in the end?


edited per trvlr to correcta couple of minor typos.

message edited by trvlr


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#50
November 10, 2017 at 10:38:32
Hi riider,
No, I did not investigate Baidu before installing it. I 'assumed' the writer had checked it out and was recommending it from experience, which I believe is what he said. So, yes, you're right.
I will check Panda though.
Thanks again for your help.
..... john

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