system mechanic pro for a virus/security

May 31, 2017 at 20:54:55
Specs: Windows 10
I just purchased a new HP Pavilion x360 Convertible 2 in 1 touch. It Came with a free trial antivirus McAfee but I have a System Mechanic Pro Subscription. Can I use it as my ONLY virus/security program? That's all I've been using on my Dell 6 years. Do I need to run additional security/virus program like defender or Norton, McAfee?

See More: system mechanic pro for a virus/security

Reply ↓  Report •

#1
May 31, 2017 at 22:24:48
Please note that you cannot run more than one full time AV scanning program or there will be conflict.
Please note that in order to uninstall the McAfee free trial (especially if you tried it), you need to go to McAfee's web site and locate their uninstaller, download it and run it. Uninstalling it without their uninstaller often leaves behind stuff that may make it more difficult to run another AV program well.
I do not know much about System Mechanic Pro but I advise against running Mcafee and Norton very strongly since both use system resources poorly (wastefully) and can slow down an otherwise fast system without really offering protection on par with some free programs out there.
I personally run Webroot Secure Anywhere and have for many years.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
June 1, 2017 at 08:21:46
System Mechanic wouldn't be my choice but it can be used as your only AV if you wish You shouldn't have more than one AV running in full time because they check each other and cause issues.

With most AVs Windows turns off Defender if it finds them but it can be turned off manually from the Control Panel if necessary.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
June 3, 2017 at 17:43:22
Of all the AV programs discussed in these forums, System Mechanic is not one of them. I believe it used to be thought of as adware/spyware but somehow became "legit", much like WildTangent which used to be a highly undesirable program.

There are a lot of decent free AV programs out there that are as good or better than the retail offerings. I'm a fan of BitDefender Free Edition but there are plenty of others - AVG, Avira, AVAST, etc. As mentioned, there's also Windows Defender, which I personally wouldn't advise. This article explains:

http://www.techradar.com/news/the-b...


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 3, 2017 at 17:56:51
Good read here. I have been using MS AV's for as long as I can remember. Nice & simple, no need for so many bells & whistles.
Former Mozilla Engineer: Your Antivirus Is Poison, Remove It Now
http://news.softpedia.com/news/form...
"Specifically, O'Callahan points out that all antivirus solutions except for Microsoft’s actually do more harm on a system, as they create additional security flaws that can be exploited by attackers. He says Windows Defender is a “competent” piece of software, emphasizing that third-party security vendors do not follow their standard security practices and in the end expose users and their data."

Reply ↓  Report •

#5
June 4, 2017 at 16:35:21
I used AVG (free) in the Win 98 days and Avast (free) for some part of the XP days. Both were intrusive and are more so these days. Turned to MSE and, when it arrived, its improved Windows Defender reincarnation. Have never had any complaints.

Often things like this boil down to personal experience. For example, many folk say CCleaner's registry cleaner is safe. Sure it is one of the safest ones around but it has definitely messed up the odd program of mine - repeatable too.

I know little about System Mechanic's AV but their magic fix-all program has screwed up a few computers on here over the years.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
June 4, 2017 at 19:50:04
quote
Former Mozilla Engineer: Your Antivirus Is Poison, Remove It Now
http://news.softpedia.com/news/form...
end quote

Funny, at the end of the article there is an add of avast, a 3rd party antivirus product :-)


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
June 4, 2017 at 20:00:25
http://news.softpedia.com/news/form...
"Funny, at the end of the article there is an add of avast, a 3rd party antivirus product :-)"
Not for me, must be blocked by this.

adaware ad block
https://www.adaware.com/ad-block/


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
June 4, 2017 at 21:39:16
"...at the end of the article there is an add of avast, a 3rd party antivirus product"

Didn't see it, probably because I have adblock installed.

What I found interesting was that he was all to eager to cheer on Microsoft's AV product (I'm assuming Security Essentials), stating it "blocked Firefox updates". I've had far more trouble with Mozilla forcing an update (using Portable Firefox 30) than anything else on my machine. I don't want the update (the 40.x versions are bog-slow on a P4-with 2GB of RAM running XP and also breaks all my needed add-ons). Disabling everything I could find didn't help. Finally found a file in "C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Local Settings\Temp\MozUpdater\bgupdate" which I zipped-up and deleted the original. That seems to have solved the "forced-update" problem. This "engineer" doesn't seem to realize that sometimes their own product is more of a problem than the AV software he wants to point fingers at....

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
June 5, 2017 at 05:31:17
The same logic that has nearly all software designers making their software start with Windows 'to make access to the program faster'. Of course when ten or twenty (or even 3 or 4 sometimes) do this then everything becomes slow. With an SSD drive today most programs launch within seconds so there is no reason for any but the most important monitoring software to be launched with Windows.
I have tried over many years various AV software and most are very invasive and annoying even during normal usage. Way back with my first Windows 95 machine, it came with McAfee and it was horrible. I switched shortly to Norton and for a number of years it was fine back then. As things happen they had many ideas for 'improving it' which made it also a system hog but did little to improve protection. I ended up adding a malware monitor that was designed to work with your AV program by Webroot. This cleared up the holes in my protection but did not solve the invasive nature of Norton. You always had pop ups to update it, false warnings, and untimely demands to scan your system which made the system unusable for almost anything until it was finished. Eventually Webroot offered a complete AV program so I dumped Norton and upgraded. Immediately the system ran like a brand new machine so I was happy. Over the years since then I have tried AVG, Avast, and one or two more on other machines but remained with Webroot on all of my machines. Free Avast was fairly decent for a while on some older machines at work but it became annoying as they moved towards making money off of it so I recommended moving to Webroot as well and we have been happy with it there as well. It has changed other the years but in my opinion always for the better.
I am not in any way associated with the company and I have always paid for my subscription (discounted as a 5 user license as offered to all) and wanted to share my experience with those who have been using most of the other junk out there (I do not include MS in this group though I have not tried their latest).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question