Relevant Knowledge marketing file rlvknlg.exe is not a Virus

January 12, 2012 at 23:54:28
Specs: Windows XP
I have seen people complaining about it but honestly speaking it's not a virus. The software is used to measure online activity. I also thought it to be a virus initially but then found their website relevant knowledge dot come. I did not have any problem in uninstalling it.

See More: Relevant Knowledge marketing file rlvknlg.exe is not a Virus

Report •


#1
January 13, 2012 at 01:02:40
One person's 'market research tool' is another person's spyware and I would certainly never recommend anyone to install it on their computer, even if it does uninstall easily.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


Report •

#2
January 13, 2012 at 02:54:52
http://www.google.com/cse?cx=partne...

sounds like crap to me. You either work for them or you don't mind being tracked and monitored by some foreign entity you know nothing about.

larry


Report •

#3
January 14, 2012 at 12:40:25
It was included in a download and installation of another program I wanted. I didn't realize I had installed that, too. Soon, that program file, rlvknlg.exe, was slowing my computer by looking for a lot of stuff. I checked with my Norton Internet Security to see if it could have access to the internet and it could, so I turned that ability off. Then I could not access any sites from any browser. That program was sending the information of what I was doing on a browser to relevantknowledge dot com and then the browser displayed the site.
I used the Windows Control Panel to delete the program. Then everything returned to normal.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 26, 2012 at 20:44:08
Relevantknowledge is not a virus. It is a Research software. If you find it annoying, you can uninstall it from control panel. You can read more about this software on their website relevantknowledge.com

Report •

#5
January 26, 2012 at 20:54:44
No it's not a virus it's annoying "spyware" that is installed by tricking the user or evading the user all together.
The term "spyware" can be good or bad and Relevantknowledge is debatable which one it is? It's more like a interactive tracking cookie, which tells "someone" all of your browsing habits.
I would never see the use or need to install it on purpose as it does no good to the user. If you have it on your pc I highly recommend uninstalling it.

Report •

#6
January 26, 2012 at 21:04:22
Michal123 and jonejan98 I see you are both noobs to this site. The people here remove this "Research Software"(Spyware) from user pc's on a weekly basis. You will find no one on this site, who you could convert into liking this software.
I totally agree with larryf215 you must have some connection to it?
It's hard case how you both bothered to create a user profile just to promote RelevantKnowledge, something smells fishy.

Report •

#7
March 28, 2012 at 01:03:10
In my opinion, Relevant knowledge is a spyware since it collects information about your internet activity and it is evading user and automatically installing through some other software installation.

spy·ware/ˈspīˌwe(ə)r/
Noun:
Software that self-installs on a computer, enabling information to be gathered covertly about a person's Internet use, passwords, etc.

The thing is, I have it on a several computers and on neither I have installed it willingly. Zone Alarm blocks it just fine though.

As I understand it is installed on your machine but you need to join RK community to enable it. Who knows if it sends info about your activity even if you are not registered. And who knows how many similar "legal" spies are in our computers...


Report •

#8
March 28, 2012 at 14:16:43
vgojak said
"And who knows how many similar "legal" spies are in our computers..."
Very true, Google does the same sort of thing and gets hit up in Courts over privacy issues all the time.
Legal or not it's an invasion of our privacy and should not be tolerated at all. Only a idiot would allow these spyware's onto their pc's intentionally.
I use DuckDuckGo as a browser as it collects a very bare minimum of info and doesn't on sell the info.


Report •

#9
April 30, 2012 at 08:23:57
Please be assured that comScore, the parent company of RelevantKnowledge, has invested substantial resources in making our data collection and privacy practices the best they can possibly be. Our company adheres to industry-accepted best practices regarding the collection and secure storage of the data collected by software such as RelevantKnowledge.
comScore is recognized as a leader in the privacy space by organizations such as the OnlineTrust Alliance, where our co-founder Gian Fulgoni was a panelist earlier this year, along with representatives from the FTC and TRUSTe. (link to http://blog.comscore.com/2012/01/co...
If you have further questions about RelevantKnowledge, please visit our website: http://www.relevantknowledge.com/fa...
Thank you,
RelevantKnowledge Customer Support Team

Report •

#10
April 30, 2012 at 11:10:23
The issue is more that the only way you can get your spyware (which is what it is in the true sense of the term, whether you like it or not) installed on a machine is to have it piggy-backed as part of another piece of software. It's irrelevant whether the software is free or not, and I guess your argument would be that because it IS free that the price the user pays is to get your software as well. Unfortunately, because you don't make this clear during installation the result is that your software gets the reputation it does. Maybe if you chose to have it as an 'opt-in' install, rather than an 'opt-out' install you may get more sympathy for your aims.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


Report •

#11
May 1, 2012 at 00:56:33
http://cleanbytes.net/relevant-know...
http://www.expertsupportnow.com/122...
http://www.411-spyware.com/remove-r...
http://www.neuber.com/taskmanager/p...
http://gsa.ca.com/pest/pest.aspx?ID...
And there are many more links, my problem is you track users spending and transactions as well as their browsing habits. Then you give this information to third parties for cash. And when cash is involved privacy takes a turn for the worst.
As I said earlier in this thread, Google has been in and out of Court a lot. Yet they too claim they only use the information for good?
If it was the the police in most Country's doing what you guys do you would need a Court order and a search warrant.

Please reply and let us know if our help worked.


Report •


Ask Question