How to get rid o porn sites and pop up's on my laptop?

December 17, 2019 at 10:23:04
Specs: Windows 10
Every time I log on to my laptop a porn site is on my home page.This is very annoying not to mention disgusting. Can anyone help me?

See More: How to get rid o porn sites and pop ups on my laptop?

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#1
December 17, 2019 at 13:32:51
Here are the first 2 steps, more steps will be needed, after I see the results of these logs.

Step 1: Run AdwCleaner
https://www.softpedia.com/get/Antiv...
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/do...
https://www.malwarebytes.com/adwcle...
https://toolslib.net/downloads/view...
Tutorials if needed.
https://www.adlice.com/documentatio...
https://adwcleaner-download.com/how...
Close all open programs and internet browsers.
Double click on AdwCleaner.exe to run the tool.
Click Scan
In the results tabs, uncheck anything you don't want to remove.
Click on Cleaning.
Confirm each time with Ok.
Reboot, a text file will open after the restart.
Please Copy & Paste the contents of that logfile with your next reply.

Step 2: Run Malwarebytes Anti-Malware ( MBAM ) Use Threat Scan.
https://www.softpedia.com/get/Antiv...
https://www.freewarefiles.com/Malwa...
https://www.freewarefiles.com/scree...
https://www.malwarebytes.org/downlo...
Forum
https://www.malwarebytes.org/forums/
After the Free trial, I choose this.
https://fs5.directupload.net/images...
You then get this screen.
https://fs5.directupload.net/images...
Or,
Deactivate Malwarebytes for Windows Premium Trial
https://support.malwarebytes.com/do...
At the end of a scan, you will get something like this.
https://fs5.directupload.net/images...
https://fs5.directupload.net/images...
https://fs5.directupload.net/images...
After clicking on > View Report & then > Export. Click 'Copy to Clipboard'
Paste the contents of the clipboard into your reply.


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#2
December 17, 2019 at 14:42:19
In addition to the above, run a full scan with whatever antivirus program you have installed. And you should consider installing CCleaner-Slim & using it regularly.

https://www.ccleaner.com/ccleaner/b...
https://www.ccleaner.com/ccleaner/f...


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#3
December 18, 2019 at 07:56:29
And if the home page isn't reset to one you prefer.. then there is an option in every browser to allow you to (re)set it accordingly. Always presuming that the pest(s) which changed it in the first place have been removed..

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Related Solutions

#4
February 5, 2020 at 04:22:02
Thanks, @johnw! I got similar problem with danielb, too. It's fixed now because of this thread!

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#5
February 5, 2020 at 04:29:27
YW ticklishfrog761. Thanks for the feedback.

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#6
February 6, 2020 at 12:06:22
Can anyone explain how the porn sites manage to do that?

What vulnerability do they exploit?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#7
February 6, 2020 at 15:17:25
"What vulnerability do they exploit?"
Your finger.

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#8
February 6, 2020 at 15:31:26
By doing what? Particularly in the case of the OP.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#9
February 6, 2020 at 15:42:23
Without more info, no idea.

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#10
February 6, 2020 at 20:59:00
When you click on a link you do not know if the word, button, or picture will bring you to a site, open a pop up, cause a download, an applet, a cookie, a Java script, etc. We need to be especially careful when on sites we cannot know if we trust them. That is why I recommend scanning with manual programs like listed above weekly and anytime your browser or system acts somehow different than normal. This plus care where you go online and a good antivirus program is usually enough. Back ups are the ultimate protection.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
February 8, 2020 at 18:11:04
What I meant by my question is, for example, does a script on
a web page run in the user's browser and change the user's
home page to whatever web page the script specifies? If so,
what scripting language can do that? Why would the language
be capable of doing such a thing without the user's permission?
If it is not done by a script in a web page, then what is it done by?
Does it depend on the web browser in use? Why or why not?
Does it depend on ports being open other than the basic ports
needed to browse the Internet? Is it done by a bad program that
I download and install? If so, does the web page change when I
install the program or when I run it?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#12
February 9, 2020 at 03:12:00
The Java script on this page shows how a hacker can get access to your PC cmd (dos style command executable) and execute common PC commands.
https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/java-...

Browsers are "downloaders" by nature. It downloads pages from a server to be displayed in the browser including scripts to interact with the user, even complete applications that can run in a browser.
If you don't like scripts running in your browser, turn off "Javascript" in the browser settings. But don't be surprised that most websites don't behave as expected.

Some anitvirus and antimalware packages (internet security)offer the user to be notified if some programs (browser included) tries to access certain folder (like system & data folders) or dangerous network pages etc.. You will have to "train" the package what is allowed or you end up answering every notification popping up.

I'm using Bidefender Antivirus Plus. Am I completely safe? NO! But at least I have some defenses up.
I'm sure you find free packages on the internet.


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#13
February 9, 2020 at 11:57:37
The page you linked to is about using a Java script, not JavaScript.
To the best of my knowledge, almost every computer has JavaScript
running while very few computers have Java running. That suggests
that relatively few computers are susceptible to the kind of exploit
asked about by the OP.

Doesn't it?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
February 9, 2020 at 16:39:22
While Java is more of a threat (or at least an open invitation), anything that can run an app without your specific OK can be exploited, Javascript included.
Even programs that you download can have small programs piggy backed to them so when you do OK them for install, you are OK'ing all to install. This is why you have to be careful to uncheck things on your installers. The possibility of them not even giving you the option to opt out is there if they want to exploit it. Most program writers include these piggy back programs because they make their money from them, the honest ones will let you opt out of them.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#15
February 10, 2020 at 00:56:15
I gather that nobody who has posted so far actually knows
how a user's home page could be replaced or altered without
the user's informed consent. You don't know what vulnerability
is exploited, whether it is browser-dependant, whether it requires
malware to be installed, or whether it requires a particular script
interpreter to be running.

So you don't really know how to prevent it.

There must be some specific action that could be taken to
prevent the home page from being altered, but since you don't
know what the vulnerability is, all you can recommend is to
follow general guidelines for avoiding or detecting malware,
without any clue whether or not that will suffice.

Right?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#16
February 10, 2020 at 20:25:01
It is not vulnerability, it is by design. It is called Browser EXTENSION which can be abused by the creators of the extension.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brows...

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#17
February 11, 2020 at 21:46:15
Would hijacking the user's home page depend on a browser
extension, or is it as likely to have been done some other way?

I presume that one way to do it with a browser extension would
be to advertise an extension that promises the user something
he wants his browser to do, but delivers something else. In that
case it is only people who install browser extensions who would
be vulnerable.

The browsers that came with Windows 10 came with add-ons
already added on. I trust those add-ons no less and no more
than I trust the browsers -- which is not much -- but why does a
browser need to come with preinstalled add-ons? Is it so they
can be optionally disabled or removed?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#18
February 12, 2020 at 20:51:43
This is getting a little side tracked from the original subject.
The original poster has walked away or is sitting aside and looking at his hijacked post.
The few who understand well the questions you are now asking are mostly those who:
1- exploit it.
2- protect against it
3- design browsers or operating systems
The people who exploit it are just about as advanced as those who are trying to protect us against it
To make a system or even a browser that would have no vulnerabilities would probably be too cumbersome to use for normal things. We need flexibility for all the things we do with our computers.
Keeping a good AV program and manually scanning with the prior mentioned programs on a periodic basis is right now the best compromise as I see it.
If this is not good enough for you then maybe Linux is the best answer for you rather than Windows.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#19
February 13, 2020 at 07:35:08
The thinking underlying my questions might be:

If my computer is vulnerable to malware, I should
understand why it is vulnerable. If for no other reason,
at least so that I can also understand what is or is not
adequate to protect it.

About on the same level as understanding why a car
needs gasoline to power it, and how it can be that a
car can be powered by electricity instead.

The explanations of computer vulnerability I've seen
are generally at a kindergarten level. Gasoline makes
the car go! I don't need to be able to design or build
a car, and I don't need to be able to design or build a
computer virus or antivirus program. But there is a
heck of a long distance between answers to children
and an advanced engineering degree.

I can't build a car engine, I've never even replaced a
single part on one. But I can tell you in general terms
what happens inside the cylinders as gasoline and air
are pumped in, compressed, and ignited, and the gases
expand, pushing the pistons out, turning the crankshaft.
Maybe at a junior high school level.

You are saying that if understanding that gasoline makes
a car go is not good enough for me, then maybe I should
ride the bus instead.

I'll estimate that my first computer could do about 70% of
what my Windows 10 computer can do. The Windows
computer has 60,000 times as much memory. Its operating
system is 340,000 times as large. Of course, over half of
that is zeros. Just zeros.

Still, Microsoft must have put a staggeringly enormous effort
into finding ways to create new vulnerabilities.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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