Where can I put a command in regedit so that it effects all

June 13, 2017 at 07:08:06
Specs: iPhone
Where can I put a command in regedit so that it effects all of C drive?
Thank you for your help!
It is appreciated

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#1
June 13, 2017 at 08:03:42
What you are asking doesn't really make sense. Regedit commands change registry entries for programs, services, etc. These are mostly on the C drive.

Give us much more about what exactly you are trying to do.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
June 13, 2017 at 09:11:03
The other day I decompressed my hard drive upon doing so I noticed that for some reason many of my files on C drive were EFS encrypted however I have found a regedit command to disable it. I just need to know where to put the file so that it will affect all of c drive

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#3
June 13, 2017 at 10:05:30
The registry hack you have found will disable the efs service for the whole drive. But note that you will need to decrypt the files before doing this. Obviously a simple registry command won't do this, otherwise the encryption would not be very effective.

Log on as the user owning those files, decrypt them, then apply the registry edit.

message edited by ijack


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#4
June 13, 2017 at 10:14:24
There isn't some place in the registry that is designated as relating specifically to a drive and regedit is just a registry editor.

For anyone to look into this query:

1. Copy/Paste the command on here or give us a link to it.

2. Say what operating system you are running (your spec says iPhone) because all registries are not identical.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
June 13, 2017 at 10:22:07
I'm not exactly sure how to as I had all of the control until I decompressed the hard drive now every time I go into properties of a and click advanced I get "Choose the settings you want for this folder
When you click ok or apply on the properties dialog, you will be asked if you want the changes to affect all subfolders and files as well" And the encrypt data to secure files is not clickable

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#6
June 13, 2017 at 10:36:06
It is windows 10 and the command I want to run is
In the Run dialog box, type regedit.exe.
Navigate to the subkey HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft \Windows NT\CurrentVersion\EFS.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
Enter EfsConfiguration for the value name and 1 for the value data to disable EFS. (A value of 0 enables EFS.)
Restart the computer.
If EFS is disabled and a user tries to encrypt a file or folder, a message tells the user that “An error occurred applying attributes to the file: filename. The directory has been disabled for encryption.”

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#7
June 13, 2017 at 11:47:20
The location is already given:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft \Windows NT\CurrentVersion\EFS

In that place you then add a DWORD Value named:
EfsConfiguration

You give this a value of 1 to disable EFS or 0 to enable EFS.

It is important to get things exactly right in the registry, so no extra spaces, case changes, etc.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
June 13, 2017 at 12:12:57
Take note of my advice to decrypt any encrypted files before you apply this process. Otherwise you may be unable to decrypt them.

Is there a particular reason that you want to disable the efs service? It provides a useful defence against unauthorised access to your files, and I don't think it imposes a particularly high performance overhead.


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#9
June 13, 2017 at 12:50:00
Batman322,

It sounds like you found some files that were encrypted, and you
do not know how or why they were encrypted. Is that correct?

Do you have any idea what those encrypted files contain?
If not, I would suspect that they probably don't contain anything
human-readable or interesting. But you might want to try to
discover how they got there. It shouldn't be necessary to disable
encryption to prevent such files from being created. Instead,
whatever program created them should be disabled, if it is doing
something you don't want.

It might turn out that those files aren't actually encrypted.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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