how do you do a quiet net stop

Acer / ASPIRE
April 29, 2010 at 09:50:37
Specs: Windows 7, 2.1/4gb
Ok I need to stop a service that has dependencies.

Annoyingly it asks the user to press yes or no. The trouble is that I don't want it to ask. I want it to automatically do it.

for example
"net stop mgmt"

I'm hoping to run the bat file to uninstall a program but first i need to stop some service and i would like it to be seemless or else it will hold up the process till someone clicks "y"


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#1
April 29, 2010 at 12:54:58
net stop mgmt /y

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#2
April 29, 2010 at 15:03:36
seriously is it just that?

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#3
April 29, 2010 at 16:32:59
/y


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Related Solutions

#4
April 30, 2010 at 01:19:29
:) yay solved...it was that simple..drove me nuts

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#5
May 1, 2010 at 03:49:34
Usually, using /? would answer a lot of questions already, but not in this case. It must be noted that NET is a special command, as actually the command would be NET STOP, instead of NET. Nevertheless, the Help/Usage of the command is incomplete ...

C:\>net /?
The syntax of this command is:


NET [ ACCOUNTS | COMPUTER | CONFIG | CONTINUE | FILE | GROUP | HELP |
HELPMSG | LOCALGROUP | NAME | PAUSE | PRINT | SEND | SESSION |
SHARE | START | STATISTICS | STOP | TIME | USE | USER | VIEW ]


C:\>net stop /?
The syntax of this command is:


NET STOP
service


C:\>


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#6
May 1, 2010 at 07:16:14
net help stop

Doesn't mention the /y switch, though.

NET is an old, old command from some third party network support for DOS. MS copied the syntax and functionality, which is why the command has different rules than most MS programs.


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#7
May 1, 2010 at 15:10:18
Some other commands obviously also have this "feature". The "shutdown.exe" is a nice example of that. Windows (DOS) parameters use slashes, but this one suddenly uses dashes, like on *nix

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#8
May 1, 2010 at 15:26:31
The newer commands tend to favor the dashes over the slashes. POWERSHELL! uses dashes, for instance. Anything from the SysInternals department of MS uses dashes, too.

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#9
May 3, 2010 at 09:43:30
That's good, but neither a dash or a slash is superior in power, it's just a chosen character, which the OS should follow. The power depends on what you put after the slash or dash ...

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