Solved need2 duplicate all Word files at once w/o using thumb drive

July 15, 2018 at 03:30:24
Specs: Windows 10
How do I make a copy of my many, many MS Word files from an ASUS laptop.
Is there a way to make a backup copy of the hard drive?
Or, should I not worry. If there is a crash maybe the data would be retrievable anyway?

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✔ Best Answer
July 16, 2018 at 09:27:37
Just so that your specific question doesn't get lost in the rest of the fine advice that has already been offered, let's keep it simple:

You posted: "I have thousands of individual files of MS Word. I can't save them all one-by-one. Is there a way to lump them together some how [easily]. "

To some extent they are already "lumped together". )Hopefully) They are either all in one folder (My Documents, perhaps) or you have categorized them by subject matter, client, etc. and stored in folders designated for that category.

A simple Copy/Paste of those folders will Copy/Paste the folder and it's entire contents. That should satisfy your "lump them together some how [easily]" requirement since they are already "lumped together" within the folder. Even if they are not categorized into folders and are all in one folder (along with a whole bunch of other file types) that folder can be sorted by File Type, which will "lump them together" and list them by .doc and/or .docx. You can then select them as a group and Copy/Paste them to a thumb drive or other external storage device.

I hope that helps!

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#1
July 15, 2018 at 03:41:55
You should most certainly worry. One thing is sure in life - eventually a hard drive will fail and the information on it will be irretrievable without spending vast amounts of money. So you need to copy anything important to some other media.

Now, the question is - why do you specifically rule out the use of a thumb drive? They are one of the cheapest and easiset forms of storage available. The alternatives are writeable CD/DVDs, USB hard drives, or some form of network storage (the Cloud). The latter is convenient, but fairly slow for large amounts of data, and it does mean that you are trusting someone else with your data.

The best form of backup IMO is a USB hard drive - fast, reliable, and relatively cheap. Even better is to use a disk and the Cloud. But, whatever you choose, do it now before your laptop's disk decides that this is the day it goes to that great junkyard in the sky. Unless, of course, your documents are unimportant and you can afford to lose them.


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#2
July 15, 2018 at 04:23:39
Thanks, but to be more explicit. . .

I have thousands of individual files of MS Word. I can't save them all one-by-one. Is there a way to lump them together some how [easily]. Then, of course, a thumb drive would do the trick [to just make a single copy of the combined files].


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#3
July 15, 2018 at 05:09:59
There is a host of information on this subject on Google. Here's a starting point: http://uk.pcmag.com/backup-products...

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#4
July 15, 2018 at 05:39:39
Echoing above comments re' backup of personal files..

Ideally to an external hard drive, but with duplicates of say photos, any seriously important to you files (financial?) to dvd.

USB sticks/flash drives are not really best for long term (sole) storage; more short term or porting files between systems, knowing there are secure copies elsewhere. True many now regard flash drives as more reliable than earlier, but I'd still use an external hard drive too.

Even better is a simple NAS (a server) with two drives in a mirrored configuration. Both drives are identical in content, so that if one fails (all drives will at some time, just a matter of when) the other one will still have data, and will be used to copy its content to the replacement drive.

But at least get oe usb drive to start with; and make it habit to regularly duplicate files to external safe storage.


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#5
July 16, 2018 at 09:27:37
✔ Best Answer
Just so that your specific question doesn't get lost in the rest of the fine advice that has already been offered, let's keep it simple:

You posted: "I have thousands of individual files of MS Word. I can't save them all one-by-one. Is there a way to lump them together some how [easily]. "

To some extent they are already "lumped together". )Hopefully) They are either all in one folder (My Documents, perhaps) or you have categorized them by subject matter, client, etc. and stored in folders designated for that category.

A simple Copy/Paste of those folders will Copy/Paste the folder and it's entire contents. That should satisfy your "lump them together some how [easily]" requirement since they are already "lumped together" within the folder. Even if they are not categorized into folders and are all in one folder (along with a whole bunch of other file types) that folder can be sorted by File Type, which will "lump them together" and list them by .doc and/or .docx. You can then select them as a group and Copy/Paste them to a thumb drive or other external storage device.

I hope that helps!

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#6
July 19, 2018 at 00:02:18
I knew it. There was some simple way to accomplish the task. You were very correct in that all the files are already "lumped together". So, that was my paradigm shift.

Also, the highlight cut and paste to a thumb drive worked !!


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#7
July 19, 2018 at 04:15:15
I'm glad I could help, but your last sentence confuses me.

Your subject line uses the word "duplicate". Your OP uses the word "copy".

Your last sentence uses the word "cut".

A cut and paste will typically move a file, not copy/duplicate it.

I just want to make sure that you actually accomplished your goal, whatever that might be.

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#8
July 19, 2018 at 05:11:07
A wee word of warning when using "cut 'np aste" to transfer files to another location...

Safe to use "copy" and then verify they have arrived intact/OK. Then delete them (if needs-be) from original location.

Cut 'n paste "can" - and often does - go awry and one lose the files in the process...

So use the safer approach - i.e copy first...?


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