Hyperlinks in Excel

February 11, 2009 at 07:25:24
Specs: Vista Ultimate, Intel E6750/4gb
I'm trying to set up a presentation (for want of a better description) spreadsheet which has hyperlinks to tables I've already created. At the moment the hyperlink works fine, but when it's clicked on, the table is displayed in place of the main presentation. What I would like is to have the tables that are linked to shown as call-outs or similar so that the viewer can easily go back to the main page again by just clicking anywhere on the background to remove the hyperlinked page (hope this makes sense). I suppose it's similar to the 'comment' function, but it needs to display tables, not just text. Any ideas anyone?

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#1
February 11, 2009 at 08:08:30
Where are these tables located? Are they separate files?

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#2
February 11, 2009 at 08:15:45
Yes, at the moment they are small separate spreadsheets on different sheets in the same workbook.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#3
February 12, 2009 at 12:44:45
They can't be "small separate spreadsheets on different sheets".

They might be ranges on different sheets, but a sheet is a sheet is a sheet.

Why not just include a nearby hyperlink or button to return the user to the main page?

I suppose you could write some code to open the hyperlinked range in a new window and then size that window to not be full screen, but clicking the background wouldn't close the window and you might end up with lots of open windows. Maybe some Windows.Deactivate code could be used to close the target once the background is clicked. Sounds like work.


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#4
February 12, 2009 at 13:08:27
Hmmm, no, they are 'small spreadsheets on different sheets', ie one workbook with 10 or so sheets, the main one linked into the 'smaller' sheets. I can happily use the back arrow to return to the main sheet, but I suppose what I'm looking for is a method of displaying the smaller sheets almost as pop-ups within the main sheet - much like a webpage, but set out as a spreadsheet. The example I've seen is called 'Sharescope' but I'm guessing they've got a proprietary program, even though it looks similar to Excel, so maybe what I'm looking for cannot be achieved within Excel, but it's worth asking the question.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#5
February 12, 2009 at 20:38:35
Hmmm, I guess it depends on your definition of a spreadsheet.

From: http://spreadsheets.about.com/od/uv...

Definition:
A workbook is a spreadsheet file. By default, each workbook in Excel contains three pages or worksheets.

The term spreadsheet is often used to refer to a workbook, when in actual fact, spreadsheet refers to the computer program, such as Excel.

So, strictly speaking, when you open the Excel spreadsheet program it loads an empty workbook file consisting of three blank worksheets for you to use.

Therefore, based on that definition (as well as many others) I contend that you have a workbook with multiple sheets each of which contain a relatively small amount of data. That, in my opinion, is not the same thing as having "small separate spreadsheets on different sheets".

There are numerous definitions of "spreadsheet" available on the web. A range of cells in an Excel sheet doesn't fit any definition that I can find.


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#6
February 12, 2009 at 23:27:35
Oooer, thanks for the lesson - being a bit long in the tooth & having used spreadsheets since they were paper derived, I've always used the terms of sheet and book as they were originally termed and as Microsoft uses them within the program - ie open a new workbook and it contains 3 sheets (not spreadsheets, as they do not become that until they have data in them) & Excel is a spreadsheet program, not just a spreadsheet.

Anyway, haven't got time for any more pointless discussion as it's getting me no further forward. Shall look elsewhere, thanks for your interest though ;-)

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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