Solved How open crashed nsf files?

June 23, 2015 at 07:39:56
Specs: Windows 7
My Thinkpad crashed and luckily I had backed up 2 days before using Rescue and Recovery. All my files have been retrieved including the Lotus Notes archives etc....except for my contacts (address book) which are a file called names.nsf. I can go into R&R and when I retrieve an individual file, I see the file on the external hard drive (about 85Mb) but when I try to retrieve it, it gives me an error saying "Unable to restore file: C:\.... Contact your administrator if this error occurs again". I would say that it's a bad sector on the external hard drive, but there are 4 backups on the hard drive and I can't retrieve the file from any of them. It seems to more of a problem with the type of file itself. There is another '.nsf' file that I can't retrieve which is a journal/memo. Maybe there's a problem retrieving .nsf files? Is there some other way to retreive it such as a different way to uncompress the file outside of the R&R program....although I can't see the files on the hard drive directly - only if I view the files through the R&R program. Any help or ideas would be appreciated....it has years of contact information that's causing me to limp along. Thanks!

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✔ Best Answer
June 23, 2015 at 12:06:03
If you see an error "File is not database" then try to use the program to restore the NSF Viewer Tool as well as detailed information look here http://www.nsf.viewertool.com/


#1
June 23, 2015 at 07:53:43
Your mistake was in copying backups to only one external hard drive instead of having copies on at least two external hard drives.

I have no less than four external hard drives with identical backup data on all of them.

The chances of all those backups being destroyed/corrupted at the same time is extremely remote. That's how much importance I attach to my data, important enough to buy four separate hard drives for the purpose.

I don't think you will win in your quest to recover the file in question if you only have backups on a single drive.

message edited by phil22


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#2
June 23, 2015 at 08:51:37
phil22,

I have no issue with your protection scheme, although some may say that 4x back-ups is a bit over the top. ;-)

However, eskilddam did say the following:

"I would say that it's a bad sector on the external hard drive, but there are 4 backups on the hard drive and I can't retrieve the file from any of them. It seems to more of a problem with the type of file itself. There is another '.nsf' file that I can't retrieve which is a journal/memo."

It sounds like the only problem he is having is related to .nsf files. It would seem kind of strange (coincidental?) that a drive would fail in such a way that it only impacts one file type.

Obviously the only way to prove that it is a physical drive problem would be to create backups on multiple drives like you do (or at a minimum do a single backup to another drive) and then see what happens with the .nfs files, but I gotta say that it seems pretty strange that his single drive would fail only for .nsf files.

I'm far from an OS/file extension expert, so if you know of a way that a single filetype could be impacted by a drive failure, I would certainly appreciate learning about that. Learning is good! ;-)

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#3
June 23, 2015 at 09:12:39
Can but echo phil22 overall re' data safeguarding.

Wise(r) to have two sets of any important data at any time. Minimum two sets of DVD and if possible another (usb) hard drive drive - at least. Absolute minimum two sets of DVD; or one set of DVD and an external hard drive. And rather than "backup" - which means it's in code... - simply duplicate/copy data to the external storage media. Straight copies will thus be immediately available on any working system (providing it recognises the file system of course).

Equally as they're cheap enuff (for many pholks although perhaps not for all) a simple SOHo NAS is wise option too. A two drive NAS is not much cash; and set up as simple mirror system is the basic and easiest to employ. I have a QNAP TS 210 which has stood me well over the last few years. And even with an NAS - back it up to an external drive regularly... If one drive dies in a Mirror system, one simply replaces it and rebuilds the mirror from the good drive... BUT always one has an external drive backup for the server as well. I have WD Elements for mine - 1TB; and critical stuff is also on DVD.

Never having come across " .nsf " file format before... I dun a wee look-see "out there (Skully)" and discover it's usually a Lotus item?

I then dun another trawl using the string: - recover access to nsf file - and this list appears... Possibly something there may assist?

http://tinyurl.com/pucn7hc

And this is list of possibles found using the string: - recover access to nsf file from R&R

http://tinyurl.com/pekj5hq

There are few recovery routines in the list...; these being some of them

http://tinyurl.com/8cvuzht

http://tinyurl.com/ptukccu

http://tinyurl.com/ntgaf9o

And this list - using the string - recover access to nsf file from R&R backup - may have a few possibles?

http://tinyurl.com/p7v6yox

And a "very loooong shot..." With the drive connected via usb to a working system - and ideally another drive also connected via usb... try some of the other assorted recovery utilities; if only to get the data onto a decent disk?

Mind you that four backup on the same disk all have problems with the same file does have me more than a little curious... I'm inclined to think this not simply a damaged sector issue; rather a dodgy (at creation?) file; and if so then some of the recovery routines specific to .nsf files may be helpful (see the link above for some of those).

Save any recovered files to the second usb connected drive; and then copy them to DVD - immediately. Ideally make two sets of DVD as above... and even get another good hard drive too...

You might even mail the files to yourself; and leave them on the mailerver - perhaps on two email accounts. A simple/free form of cloud storage...

Recuva is on that gets regular recommendations here, by those who have used it.

I got into this post more as a learning curve for me; as the look-see/research may be useful at some future time. I have at least one chum who has Lotus stuff around...; and other still uses Corel - which is real pain at times if/when I have to access stuff from there (unless he manages to export it successfully into a format I can access via Word etc.).

message edited by trvlr


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#4
June 23, 2015 at 09:36:13
You might want to ask your question here:

http://www.lotusnotesforums.com/

Did a quick search and they have several questions regarding .nsf files.

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/

message edited by mmcconaghy


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#5
June 23, 2015 at 12:06:03
✔ Best Answer
If you see an error "File is not database" then try to use the program to restore the NSF Viewer Tool as well as detailed information look here http://www.nsf.viewertool.com/

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