Solved Excel Question: How many pixels are there in ½ square inch?

September 10, 2013 at 06:18:33
Specs: Windows Vista
I'm trying to create graph paper with 1/2" squares in an excel program but don't know how many pixels it takes for each 1/2".

See More: Excel Question: How many pixels are there in ½ square inch?

Report •

✔ Best Answer
September 10, 2013 at 13:36:06
Assuming Excel 2007 or later, try this:

1 - Click on the View tab, then chose Page Layout on the left hand side of the ribbon. Do not use the Page Layout tab, use the View tab and then the Page Layout view.

2 - Click the little box with the triangle above the row numbers to select all cells.

3 - Right click on a Column Letter, choose Column width and enter .5" in the input field.

4 - Right click on a Row Number, choose Row height and enter .5" in the input field.

Each cell should now be .5" x .5".

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.

message edited by DerbyDad03



#1
September 10, 2013 at 06:37:52
If you mean monitor pixels, most monitors have a resolution of 72 ppi. So half an inch would be half of 72 which is 36.

Report •

#2
September 10, 2013 at 09:49:41
The number of actual pixels depends on your monitor and its settings. The display pixels depends on your screen resolution.

--------------------------------------------------
Apologies if I don't respond to your reply immediately. I don't check this site daily, but you're welcome to PM me as a reminder.


Report •

#3
September 10, 2013 at 12:26:23
I believe you can set excel to .5 inches in row height and column width. Then assign borders and print. The settings should print you the right size graph paper regardless of the resolution.

::mike


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 10, 2013 at 13:36:06
✔ Best Answer
Assuming Excel 2007 or later, try this:

1 - Click on the View tab, then chose Page Layout on the left hand side of the ribbon. Do not use the Page Layout tab, use the View tab and then the Page Layout view.

2 - Click the little box with the triangle above the row numbers to select all cells.

3 - Right click on a Column Letter, choose Column width and enter .5" in the input field.

4 - Right click on a Row Number, choose Row height and enter .5" in the input field.

Each cell should now be .5" x .5".

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.

message edited by DerbyDad03


Report •

#5
September 11, 2013 at 05:20:20
Ideally, that should work, if my computer were set to accept inches instead of pixels. I did try that and it didn't work. I need something to convert the column width and column height in terms of inches. It will not accept the inches symbol. It automatically goes to pixel width and height numbers.
Thanks for your interest in helping me.
I have Microsoft XP.
Deb

Report •

#6
September 11, 2013 at 05:22:04
Ideally, this should work, and I know someone taught me how to do it eons ago, but I don't remember how, and I can't figure it out now. I have Microsoft XP, and I know it was a different version when someone showed me.
Thanks so much. I appreciate your help.
Deb

Report •

#7
September 11, 2013 at 05:23:19
I tried this and it is very close to being accurate, but I did have to tweak it a little, but the 36 is the best I can do.
Thanks so much for your help. I have Microsoft XP.
Deb

Report •

#8
September 11, 2013 at 05:56:38
DeborahSurgot,

When you say you have "Microsoft XP" most of us would consider that to be the Operating System version, not the version of Microsoft Office (Excel, Word, PowerPoint, etc.).

Microsoft Office XP was introduced in 2001 and is a very outdated version of Office.

What version of Office are you running?

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.

message edited by DerbyDad03


Report •

#9
September 11, 2013 at 06:04:28
DeborahSurgot,

Just a posting tip...

When you reply to a message in this forum, it helps if you either quote the relevant part of the post you are replying to or include the name of the member you are responding to.

You responded 3 times, using words like "I tried this .." and "Ideally, that should work" but we can't tell what you tried or what you think "should work" because we can't tell which suggestion you are responding to.

Just something for you to keep in mind in the future. Thanks!

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

#10
September 11, 2013 at 06:26:22
Look here, has a short conversion table that should help:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/e...

The only way, of actually seeing if your cells are 1/2 inch square, is to print out the sheet.
Because the size of an Excel cell is also dependent on how you have your video monitor set up.
If you have your screen resolution set for 1680 x 1050 what you see will be different then if is were set for 800 x 600

Why are you creating graph paper that needs 1/2 inch cells?

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


Report •

#11
September 11, 2013 at 07:23:40
Mike:

This could be a interesting discussion. "Because the size of an Excel cell is also dependent on how you have your video monitor set up."

Is the size of an Excel cell defined by what we see on our screen or what we see on a printout?

If I use the View...Page Layout method I described in Response #4, I can set the size of the cell to .5" x .5". The cell may not appear to be .5" x .5" on my monitor, but if I print the sheet - or check the Column width/Row height setting - it will indeed be .5" x .5".

One could argue that the size of the cell is based on the Column width/Row height setting even if the cell does not appear to be the size shown by those settings because of the monitor settings or Zoom level within Excel.

I agree that the only way to be 100% sure what size the cells are is to print out the page, but once I've tried and verified that printout matches various Column widths/Row heights setting, I can be fairly confident that the size of the (printed) cell will match the setting size.

Therefore the question is: Is the actual size of the cell "dependent on how you have your video monitor set up" or is it based on the Column width/Row height setting which will be used for printing?

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

#12
September 11, 2013 at 07:47:41
I think it's depends on what the OP is trying to do.

If the OP wants to see on his screen, cells that are 1/2 inch square,
as measured on his screen at the current moment, then the screen
resolution, Zoom level, etc. must be taken into consideration.
But, if the OP is a novice or casual user, they may not be aware
that what you see on the screen, is not necessarily what you
get when you print out the sheet.

It's the end use that matters, that why I asked why he needed graph paper
with 1/2 inch squares.

I would think going to a stationary store and buying a pad of graph paper would be cheaper then printing it out on a printer.
And if that's all the OP wants to do is print out some 1/2 inch square graph paper, then here is a simpler solution:

http://www.waterproofpaper.com/grap...

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


Report •

#13
September 11, 2013 at 09:14:32
re: I would think going to a stationary store and buying a pad of graph paper would be cheaper then printing it out on a printer.

That depends on who's buying. ;-)

I can print out reams of 1/2" graph paper via Excel at no (direct) cost to me if I do it at work.

Your link might be a viable solution for the OP. The gray grid prints very, very light but the blue grid isn't as bad. As long as the OP doesn't mind the website's name at the bottom of the sheet that might very well work for her.

Of course, with the Excel method, there is the option for custom headers, footers, etc. You are right, it all depends on the ultimate goal of the OP.

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

#14
September 11, 2013 at 09:42:03
Here's a site that uses a number of different ways to get a grid
and just for DerbyDad03, it has a macro. :-)


http://www.mrexcel.com/tip071.shtml

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/

message edited by mmcconaghy


Report •

#15
September 11, 2013 at 10:25:57
Unfortunately, the code does not accept inches as Column width/Row height values. Well, it doesn't complain if you enter .5", but it doesn't use the value in inches. You end up with some very tiny cells.

However, that got me thinking...

I recorded a macro while setting the Column width/Row height via the View...Page Layout method to 0.5" and here is what was produced:

Sub Macro2()
'
' Macro2 Macro
'

'
    ActiveWindow.View = xlPageLayoutView
    Cells.Select
    Selection.ColumnWidth = 5.71
    Selection.RowHeight = 36
End Sub

I then opened a new sheet and manually set the Column width to 5.71 and the Row height to 36 and it produced the same .5" x .5" grid.

Therefore, we might have the answer to the OP's original question:

Column width - 5.71
Row height - 36

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

#16
September 11, 2013 at 11:17:26
By George, I think you've got it....... ;-)

and when you print it on a letter size 8.5 x 11 paper you get a 14 x 21 cell matrix when you zero out all the margins.
Very clever.

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


Report •

#17
September 11, 2013 at 14:56:22
I'm using Microsoft Office

Report •

#18
September 11, 2013 at 19:59:36
DeborahSurgot,

It's obvious that you are using Microsoft Office because Excel is one of the applications within Microsoft Office.

My question was related to what version of the software you are running.

Are you running Excel 2003, Excel 2010, Excel 2013?

Regardless of what version you are using, did you try the settings I mentioned in my previous response?

Column width - 5.71
Row height - 36

Those values gave me cells that printed out as 1/2" x 1/2" squares.

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

#19
September 12, 2013 at 08:03:32
Reply to all: You are terrific. I am overwhelmed with your concern and support. I am definitely not a tecky, but I appreciated all that I have gained from reading your responses, and for seeing your absolute concern that I get a correct answer.

In response to Phil22, Your suggestion was to use 36ppi as 1/2", and that was almost perfect. Thank you.

To Xps86, I realized that the pixels and the monitor relationships could be different; hence the problem, but I was relying on the printout for the result.

To mikelinus, Yes, excel can be set to .5 inches, I finally found the solution
Go to the VIEW tab
under the PAGE LAYOUT tab, under the WORKSHOP VIEWS, I clicked onto PAGE LAYOUT.
In that view, the measurements automatically show up in inches.

This is the solution that DerbyDad03 gave in response #4, but I didn't follow it accurately. This is the BEST SOLUTION. It gave me exactly what I wanted and needed.

To mmcconaghy,
I was relying on the printout and measuring for accuracy, thank you.


Report •

#20
September 12, 2013 at 08:16:57
One last reply to all you wonderful tecky's out there is to let you know where the final aha moment came from. I was working on an excel document from a previous year, and out of curiosity, checked how the height and width were measured and they were in inches. I went back to the new one, and they were in pixels, and points. That made me more determined to be able to do it. My computer has to have a way.

I went to the excel sheet, right clicked on the cell margin and clicked on the row height. I noticed there was a question mark tab on top that I didn't investigate before. When I opened it I had the total solution. I found out that in the workbook views tab, page layout button, the measurement is SLWAYS given in inches. As I said in my last follow up, I believe that's what DerbyDad03 was telling me to do, but I was clicking on the page layout tab, and not the page layout button below it.

I'm finished and grateful.
Thanks again.
P.S. I think I have Excel 2007


Report •

#21
September 12, 2013 at 09:17:43
We're glad you found a solution and we all also learned a few things along the way.

That's why I enjoy this forum so much. I typically end up learning something as I'm researching an answer to the questions asked.

Come on back the next time you have a question.

Click Here Before Posting Data or VBA Code ---> How To Post Data or Code.


Report •

Ask Question