WPA2 Mixed Wired And Wireless

Netgear Wndr3700 rangemax dual band wire...
January 30, 2010 at 12:57:46
Specs: Windows XP
I have been Googling away and can't seem to find an answer to this question. I am about to set up a new home network with a new computer and throw away my ancient router. All the wirelss computers to be on the network have either XP SP3, Vista, ot W7 and so should be able to use WPA2 security on them. However, I have the old desktop which I would like to continue using. It will be hardwired to the router and has no wireless adaptor or capabilities. It is old and runs XP and I downloaded the WPA2 wireless update to it anyway. But I don't think the Intel PROP/1000 CT Network Connection supports WPA2 and am having trouble finding this out for sure. If this computer is hardwired into the router will it work if I enable WPA2 security on the router or will I be limited to WPA? Do computers wired into the network need the same wireless security protocol to participate?

Thanks.


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#1
January 30, 2010 at 13:25:07
WPA2 encryption is only for securing the connection from router to wireless computer, but all connected computers, regardless the connection (wired or wireless), will work. There is no WPA2, WEP or something like that, for wired connection.

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#2
January 30, 2010 at 14:32:41
Glad to hear that as the only other reference that I found regarding this implied that even the wired computer would have to support WAP2 as well to use the internet.

Howard


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#3
January 30, 2010 at 15:05:21
When you consider that WPA stands for Wireless Protected Access it is obvious that it has no relevance to a wired connection.

It helps to know what these abbreviations means.

Stuart


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#4
January 30, 2010 at 15:40:39
Stuart...I know very well what the abbreviation stands for...no need to get nasty. However, on another site someone who 'sounded' quite knowledgeable emphatically stated that the wired computer attached to the router need to be able to handle WPA2 (I hadn't asked the question, someone else did) as well as the wireless devises. Just wanted to ask here to see what folks here had to say and if they disagreed with what I had read elsewhere. Perhaps he wasn't as knowledgeable as he sounded....though I suspect he knew what the abbreviation meant.

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#5
January 31, 2010 at 06:13:34
Stuart...I know very well what the abbreviation stands for...no need to get nasty.

I didn't see his response as nasty. It wasn't even sarcastic. Just a simple statement.

However, on another site someone who 'sounded' quite knowledgeable emphatically stated that the wired computer attached to the router need to be able to handle WPA2

Well, whoever said that is an idiot. I am a Network Technician by trade and have been holding this position for 5 years now specializing in networking in it's every form. I have almost 15 years of computer related experience prior to taking this position on and I can tell you that statement is complete garbage.

As StuartS said, a wired connection needs no WPA encryption updates.

When configuring your wireless network (WLAN) you apply WPA2 encryption to the wireless network you're enabling. This means, any wireless clients that wish to connect need to be able to use WPA2 encryption, must know the SSID (if you choose not to broadcast it) and must know the password. This does not apply to wired connections, only the wireless ones.


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#6
January 31, 2010 at 13:27:01
I guess this is one of the dangers of the internet and the inability to see or hear who is speaking to you directly. I had interpreted the comment as condescending.......and perhaps I was making a mistake about that. So, Stuart, if you are out there and if you didn't mean the comment in the way I interpreted it, then I sincerely apologize.

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