Wiring Question

November 24, 2010 at 13:32:07
Specs: Windows XP
I have a new home that has a wiring closet with separate telephone and data punch blocks with Cat5 cables attached to every room in the house, terminating in RJ-45s. I want to inject the output of the router into the only RJ-11 connector in the house on the ground floor, patch it to the data block in the wiring closet on the second floor, and then hopefully to a few rooms in the house (notably the living room so I can connect my Internet TV to the network). Can this be done? My other options are to move the modem and router to the living room for direct TV access, and use the wireless capability of the router for the computers. What I hope to do is have direct network connections for both appliucations, TV and computer. Thank you in advance.

See More: Wiring Question

Report •

#1
November 24, 2010 at 14:03:04
I want to inject the output of the router into the only RJ-11 connector in the house on the ground floor, patch it to the data block in the wiring closet on the second floor

You can't. You need to use an 8 wire (4 pair) network cable to transfer network data. An RJ11 (phone) wire only has 4 wires (2 pair).

If your highspeed internet is ADSL, it actually comes in through the phone lines. You simply route that to the closet over the phone line and then go from there into the modem (supplied by ISP) and from there into the SOHO router. From the router you go either directly to the patch panel, or if you need more than the 4 LAN ports on the router, you go from a LAN port on the router to a switch. The switch of course connects to the patch panel to feed the different rooms.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#2
November 24, 2010 at 14:38:31
Curt,

thanks for the expedient reply. My Internet is supplied by Cox cable, so I use a modem and router to share the connection. I was afraid I wouldn't be able to use the RJ-11 jack. I think I'll remove the wall plate and see if the cable itself going to that jack has 4 or 8 wires. In the wiring closet, the cables going to the telephone block are 8 wire cables, so I'd be suprised if that one particular jack actually has a four wire cable going to it.

I'll follow up later tonight with updated information. On a side note, is there an adapter that has alligator clips on one end (for the telephone block) , and a RJ-45 jack on the other?


Report •

#3
November 24, 2010 at 15:13:13
I think I'll remove the wall plate and see if the cable itself going to that jack has 4 or 8 wires.

Good plan. If it's a Cat5e network cable, you just need to punch the appropriate ends on it and you're good to go. Remember, if it's not a Cat5e (or better yet Cat6) you may be able to use the existing wire to pull a network cable from A to B.

In the wiring closet, the cables going to the telephone block are 8 wire cables, so I'd be suprised if that one particular jack actually has a four wire cable going to it.

Me too, I'd almost bet it is a network cable. If it is a 4 pair, check the outer casing to see what type it is. You'll want Cat5e at the very least.

We pull and use Cat5e for all our phone lines here at work. This way you can have up to 4 phone lines per cable (2 wires per phone line). If I was the one who had cabled your house, that wire in question would definitely be the same cable as the network stuff.

On a side note, is there an adapter that has alligator clips on one end (for the telephone block) , and a RJ-45 jack on the other?

I don't know of anything like what you're describing. Explain to me what it is you need to do and I may have a way to do it, or knowledge of something built especially for it.

For example, we have BIX blocks (used for phone lines) that have RJ45 (network) connectors built into them. We use those to go from phone type cabling to network type. These are particularly handy for analog phone lines for fax machines.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
November 24, 2010 at 20:57:16
Curt,

it is a Cat 5e cable (although the sleeve is white) and says EIA 568 B.2. The blue pair connected to the RJ-11 jack. So I guess all I have to do is properly wire an RJ-45 connector to the wires and make the proper connections in the wiring closet. Then I can connect a lan cable from a spare port on the router to the new RJ-45 jack, right?


Report •

#5
November 25, 2010 at 06:03:06
it is a Cat 5e cable (although the sleeve is white)

The color of the casing doesn't matter. I use both blue and white at work. Typically, the blue is for data, the white for telephones.

All that matters is that it says it's Cat5e on the casing.

So I guess all I have to do is properly wire an RJ-45 connector to the wires and make the proper connections in the wiring closet.

Correct. Double check the A and B wiring standards on the internet (google "network cable wiring standards") and use one or the other. I generally use A but it doesn't matter which you use as long as you punch both ends with the same standard.

In the wiring closet, are the cables just hanging loose with RJ45 (male) ends on them? Or, are they punched down onto a "Network Patch Panel" (google that for an image to look at). If they terminate in a patch panel, you'll need a special "punchdown" tool to make that connection.

Then I can connect a lan cable from a spare port on the router to the new RJ-45 jack, right?

If it will reach, why not put and RJ45 end on it and plug it directly into a LAN port on the router?

RJ45 ends are male. The ports on the router are female. So lets say you put an RJ45 end on the cable that was being used for the phone. If it's not long enough to reach the router as I recommended above, and you try to connect it with a patch cable you bought, you end up with two (male) RJ45 ends looking at each other.

The resolution for that is to buy a "coupler".

The coupler is a simple little, inexpensive, device that has two RJ45 (female) connectors. It's designed to join two cables with male ends and usually only costs a couple dollars.

Alternative to the coupler you could buy a "keystone" style RJ45 connector but that is in and of itself more expensive than a coupler and requires a special "punchdown" tool (as compared to the crimper one uses to put on the male RJ45 ends). I'd buy a coupler!

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

Ask Question