Wireless + Multiple Ethernet connections?

Linksys Wrt54g wireless router
August 28, 2009 at 06:01:27
Specs: Macintosh + Windows
Planning an update to my home network, hoping for
assurance that plan will work. I want to feed 4
ethernet jacks pre-wired in my house, plus 3 additional
ethernet PCs in a home office and have a wireless
base station.

I have a cable modem at my junction box in the
garage-- home-run cat5 wiring for my house.


1) Cable Modem into Linksys WRT54G. Turn off
wireless, turn off DHCP on WRT54G (acting as simple
switch). Connect 4 ethernet cables from this to my
home's wiring.

2) Apple Time Capsule in home office. Connect WAN
port on TC to WRT54G via home's pre-wiring. Turn on
DHCP on TC. Turn on wireless (this will be my
wireless base station).

3) Connect 3 PCs in home office with ethernet to TC.

4) Connect 2 PCs elsewhere in the house with
ethernet to home's wiring (which connects to
WRT54G).

Will this work? Especially curious about step 4-- if
those hard-wired PCs elsewhere in house will get IP
addresses from the Time Capsule via the WRT54G.

I could turn off DHCP on the TC and have the
WRT54G run DHCP, but the TC is running DHCP now,
so I'd rather leave it that way if possible.

Thanks for your help!


See More: Wireless + Multiple Ethernet connections?

Report •


#1
August 28, 2009 at 06:27:52
How are the wired PCs going to get an IP address if the TC is only supplying wireless IPs?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#2
August 28, 2009 at 07:22:31
If the TC is running DHCP, my thought was the wired PCs
would get an IP from the TC-- and the WRT54G would pass any
DHCP requests to the TC. But I'm not sure-

Report •

#3
August 28, 2009 at 07:55:34
I don't know anything about TC but a quick search on it said it was a storage device & a wireless router, so I didn't think it would give IP addresses to anything wired.

The WRT54G does both, so you could use the TC as a storage device only.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 28, 2009 at 08:27:50
Personally if it were me, and I'm just a professional network technician with 15+ years in the computing industry, the last 4+ specializing in networking, I'd take guapo's advice.


I would take that WRT54G and I'd put Tomato, 3'd party firwmare or the DD-WRT 3'd party firmware found at the bottom of the page I just linked on that router and I'd connect it to my internet. Read the "Notes" Section to ensure your router is capable of using the 3'd party firmware. I recommend either firmware because of the added features and stability.

I would setup my wireless network and DHCP on it and just use the apple device for backups and as a switch.

No matter which way you decide to go, do not connect router to router using the WAN port on the downstream router. Use LAN port to LAN port connection. This is simpler to setup and doesn't require any routing tables. Basically, you configure the downstream router's LAN side with an IP in the same subnet as the rest of your LAN, but (and this is important) outside of the DHCP scope.

Generally speaking, most SOHO router's define a DHCP scope of 100 to 199 and assign .1 to themselves. So, you would set your downstream router's LAN IP to .2 with a gateway address pointing at the router connected to the internet (ie: .1)

example:

1st Router:
===========
IP: 192.168.0.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

DHCP enabled = yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199

Downstream Router:
==================
LAN Side:
IP: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
DHCP enabled = No


Report •

#5
August 28, 2009 at 09:18:27
thanks for the tips. Can you point me to any info on connecting
via WAN port (routing table, etc.) on the TC? I'd prefer not to
use up one of LAN jacks if at all possible. But thanks for your
suggestions, sounds like you know your stuff!

Report •

#6
August 28, 2009 at 09:55:38
thanks for the tips. Can you point me to any info on connecting via WAN port (routing table, etc.) on the TC? I'd prefer not to use up one of LAN jacks if at all possible. But thanks for your suggestions, sounds like you know your stuff!

You should really be using a switch for more ports, not a router. Switches require no configuration and you can get them in 8, 16, 24 (and more) ports. So if expansion is your point, do yourself a favor and buy a switch with more than enough ports (extra's to allow for growth right).

Having said that......

I don't "do" Mac/Apple so I can't help you with this TC thingie. What I can tell you is, every SOHO router I've done this with, and I've only done it for separate subnets and not for the same subnet, the route between LAN and WAN side was created automatically.

So, if nobody with experience with this TC device chimes in and offers advice, you're going to have to do it yourself. It shouldn't be that tough and shouldn't require any special routing since it's the same subnet. Just configure your WAN port as I've described the LAN configuration above.

You may have to then configure the LAN side with another IP in the same subnet (Something like: 192.168.0.3) and point the Gateway Address of the LAN side at the IP of the WAN side (192.168.0.2).

Again, I'm not sure, I'd never bother using the WAN port for connecting to the same subnet so I've never actually tried this scenario.


Report •


Ask Question