Solved Wireless bridge problems with DMG6661 and TLWR542g

March 9, 2016 at 16:16:49
Specs: Windows 7
Hello Guys,

I have a DMG6661 router. I want to use an old TLWR542g as a repeater. I tried some tutorials on the internet, but it´s not working. I could set up a new network for the tp link, but it doesn't get internet data from the DMG6661.

Anyone able to help?


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✔ Best Answer
March 10, 2016 at 15:51:16
This is link to a "how to" from CurtR - a while back.

http://www.computing.net/howtos/sho...

His first method is essentially the one I use - the only difference being that I would assign the second router (the TLWR542g) to have an ip address (reserved) at the higher end of the range; outside the scope you might retain/reserve for general use. I tend to put it at 192.168.x250 - where x is the same value as on your main/master router.

His second approach is equally viable...; but as he points out "version 1" is the easier and generally the better approach.

Note again that you need to retain the cat-5/ethernet connection for it to work - without loss of connectivity if using the wifi aspect of the second/repeater router. One can link two routers via wifi only - but it's true PIA to set up ; and generally neither stable nor reliable...

If running a cat-5 cable between the two routers isn't a practical proposition, one can use homeplugs (LAN over Mains adapters) to link the two routers. Connect the main/master router to a homeplug adapter; connect the second/repeater to a homeplug adapter and they are connected. The house mains wiring acts as a network cable...



#1
March 9, 2016 at 22:58:12
Buy a range extender, it'll save all the frustration setting it up. Then you can sell the old spare router.

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#2
March 10, 2016 at 05:27:54
I might follow your advice.

Thanks.


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#3
March 10, 2016 at 14:24:36
How were you connecting the "main/master" router to the would be repeater?

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Related Solutions

#4
March 10, 2016 at 14:31:49
How were you connecting the "main/master" router to the would be repeater?

Presumably you are able to login to both router home pages?


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#5
March 10, 2016 at 14:34:38
Yes. I did the config in both routers homepages

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#6
March 10, 2016 at 15:03:01
The second router has its dhcp disabled; both routers are connected by cat-5/ethernet; as trying to use/rely on a wifi only connection usually either won't work - or is likely to fail; especially if you reboot/power cycle the second router.

The second router uses the same password/access key as the main/master for wifi service.

I will try and dig out my now how to (in my case using a Sagem as main/master, and Thompson-Alcatel as the secondary/repeater.

What happened with the method(s) you tried thus far?


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#7
March 10, 2016 at 15:43:14
Thanks for the help. The current status is: my wifi devices can see the new wi fi spot, but this new wi fi spot is unable to retrieve internet data.

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#8
March 10, 2016 at 15:51:16
✔ Best Answer
This is link to a "how to" from CurtR - a while back.

http://www.computing.net/howtos/sho...

His first method is essentially the one I use - the only difference being that I would assign the second router (the TLWR542g) to have an ip address (reserved) at the higher end of the range; outside the scope you might retain/reserve for general use. I tend to put it at 192.168.x250 - where x is the same value as on your main/master router.

His second approach is equally viable...; but as he points out "version 1" is the easier and generally the better approach.

Note again that you need to retain the cat-5/ethernet connection for it to work - without loss of connectivity if using the wifi aspect of the second/repeater router. One can link two routers via wifi only - but it's true PIA to set up ; and generally neither stable nor reliable...

If running a cat-5 cable between the two routers isn't a practical proposition, one can use homeplugs (LAN over Mains adapters) to link the two routers. Connect the main/master router to a homeplug adapter; connect the second/repeater to a homeplug adapter and they are connected. The house mains wiring acts as a network cable...


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#9
March 10, 2016 at 15:52:20
Are your two routers connected via cat-5/ethernet - or not? That is a/the critical item...

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#10
March 10, 2016 at 15:58:37
As phill22 suggests a range extender likely would work more or less straight out of the box. Netgear make a plugin (homeplug style) adapter that will act as a wifi extender; but you also need another homeplug adapter to connect the main router to in order for the main router's lan signal to get to the distant homeplug) adapter...

And there are extenders that will detect/pick up a wifi signal (from your main router) and re-rediate it - and they don't require the main router to be plugged into a homeplug adapter...

Devolo (UK/Europe), Cisco-Linksys, D-link, and TP-link (very... low on my list of recommended) all have similar assorted devices too.

message edited by trvlr


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#11
March 10, 2016 at 15:58:47
Thanks for all the info. I'm grateful.

The routers aren't connected to each other via cable....the idea here is to create a cable free repeater. I did the configs with the main router plugged to my desktop and the repeater wired cabled to a notebook.


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#12
March 10, 2016 at 16:03:31
I would seriously consider the cat-5/ethernet connection aspect...; for all the reasons already stated earlier.

I seem to recall that older routers aren't capable of both pick up the original/master signal and then re-reradiate (extend) using wifi only.

Many of us retain older routers and use them as extenders - linked via cat-5; be it directly or via homeplug systems.


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#13
March 10, 2016 at 16:06:01
Yeah...I think i might end up doing the cable solution. Less expensive than the homeplugs.

Thanks for all your effort. God bless you!


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