Solved Why is my IP address different than the map?

April 6, 2016 at 00:24:24
Specs: Windows 7
My network map shows all devices and their connection to my router . I shows the routers IP as 172.16.0.01, my computer is 172.16.0.03 but my computer just showed me my IP address as being 73.202.198.249?? Are network maps not reliable to give correct IP addresses?

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✔ Best Answer
April 6, 2016 at 09:43:44
If one uses any of the utilities which enable one to know their "online" ip address - e.g. "what's my ip" - it will show the ip address assigned to your router by your ISP. It will not be the actual ip address of your computer within your home/office lan (network).

Also, unless by some strange quirk of fate, the actual physical location of your ISP assigned ip (wan) address will not be given/shown. To know that one needs utilities not generally available to the public (think law enforcement/intelligence agencies etc.); the actual physical address where you are and thus your router... will not be specific.

Such "find my ip address", "what's my ip address" etc. systems merely show that general area where that ip address was last known to be. And you may even find that it's shown as being miles from where you are. This because the utility you may have used is using an out of date record/data reference; and "your current" ip address may have been assigned to someone else until recently. I have found my ISP (wan) assigned ip address to be in several locations at the same time.; each one given by a different utility... And when I robbed etc. the router and was re-assigned an ip address by my ISP, that too was somewhere else on several such "what is, where s etc. utilities... Speed test utilities usually get the area correct I have found; but not the actual specific location (your address).

ISP frequently re-assign ip addresses to the clients; unless the client is on a fixed ip address deal (and they cost...). Similarly if your router is switched off for a while, or at least disconnected from your incoming ISP connection (the cable unplugged) then again you likely will get a "new" ISP assigned ip (wan) address.

If you want a fixed ip address you have to pay for it; and usually it ain't cheap. However there are companies who offer a sort of fudge arrangement and they assign you a fixed ip address off their system; think of a proxy server arrangement. These companies track/monitor as it were your ISP provided ip address (they in effect pretend to be your home router) and ensure that even if your ISP re-assigns your non fixed ip (wan) address - they (the intermediary company) will know that and ensure that you are still connected; via your "fixed ip address from the intermediary which will still be active. By in effect "pretending" to be be your router they maintain the connection for you; and merely pass it all to your "in house router" via "their" assigned ip address.

Such service are generally known as Dynamic DNS; and are considered by some to be a little more difficult to locate the actual end-user. But again if you have the software - and legally so... - then "they" can locate you...



#1
April 6, 2016 at 00:33:41
How did your computer show your IP address as 73. etc.? I suspect that that is the WAN address of your router and that you used some external web site to determine your IP address. Your computers IP address (which is on the LAN) is 172.16.0.3.

Any particular reason why you need to know it.


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#2
April 6, 2016 at 00:48:56
Is this a home network? 172.16.x.x is a private address range.
73.202.198.249 is a public IP address assigned to Comcast.

Is this your location:
http://geoiplookup.net/ip/73.202.19...


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#3
April 6, 2016 at 07:44:08
Check network drive mapping. In Linux, network drive mapping is configuring a file folder on a remote computer to share files or folders of data over a Local Area Network (LAN). This is configured on computers that want to access a USB storage device or Network Attached Storage (NAS) connected to a router. This article below will guide you on how to map a network drive or a network storage device: http://www.linksys.com/in/support-a...

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Related Solutions

#4
April 6, 2016 at 09:43:44
✔ Best Answer
If one uses any of the utilities which enable one to know their "online" ip address - e.g. "what's my ip" - it will show the ip address assigned to your router by your ISP. It will not be the actual ip address of your computer within your home/office lan (network).

Also, unless by some strange quirk of fate, the actual physical location of your ISP assigned ip (wan) address will not be given/shown. To know that one needs utilities not generally available to the public (think law enforcement/intelligence agencies etc.); the actual physical address where you are and thus your router... will not be specific.

Such "find my ip address", "what's my ip address" etc. systems merely show that general area where that ip address was last known to be. And you may even find that it's shown as being miles from where you are. This because the utility you may have used is using an out of date record/data reference; and "your current" ip address may have been assigned to someone else until recently. I have found my ISP (wan) assigned ip address to be in several locations at the same time.; each one given by a different utility... And when I robbed etc. the router and was re-assigned an ip address by my ISP, that too was somewhere else on several such "what is, where s etc. utilities... Speed test utilities usually get the area correct I have found; but not the actual specific location (your address).

ISP frequently re-assign ip addresses to the clients; unless the client is on a fixed ip address deal (and they cost...). Similarly if your router is switched off for a while, or at least disconnected from your incoming ISP connection (the cable unplugged) then again you likely will get a "new" ISP assigned ip (wan) address.

If you want a fixed ip address you have to pay for it; and usually it ain't cheap. However there are companies who offer a sort of fudge arrangement and they assign you a fixed ip address off their system; think of a proxy server arrangement. These companies track/monitor as it were your ISP provided ip address (they in effect pretend to be your home router) and ensure that even if your ISP re-assigns your non fixed ip (wan) address - they (the intermediary company) will know that and ensure that you are still connected; via your "fixed ip address from the intermediary which will still be active. By in effect "pretending" to be be your router they maintain the connection for you; and merely pass it all to your "in house router" via "their" assigned ip address.

Such service are generally known as Dynamic DNS; and are considered by some to be a little more difficult to locate the actual end-user. But again if you have the software - and legally so... - then "they" can locate you...


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#5
April 7, 2016 at 01:13:43
You can check here https://whoer.net/ru They show more data

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#6
May 26, 2016 at 05:16:19

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#7
May 26, 2016 at 06:23:58
In my (rather lengthy) reply above the phrase "when I robbed my router " should have read ...rebooted my router. Auto correct sometimes doth make interesting errors.

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