Why, if cable modem gets 180 - 200 Mbs, does desktop get 40?

July 9, 2018 at 18:48:08
Specs: Windows 10
The cable modem shows speeds of 180 + Mbs, but desktop "speed test" results show only 40Mbs down and 10Mbs up. Wired or wireless results are very nearly the same. I was told that the Ethernet card is the problem. Can this be accurate? If the card is an integral part of the motherboard, is there an external device that can improve performance?

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#1
July 9, 2018 at 20:29:09
"I was told that the Ethernet card is the problem"
Do you have an onboard port to try?

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#2
July 9, 2018 at 20:49:38
On a desktop computer you can disable the onboard NIC and use an add on card (PCIe or PCI).
Check your router's set up and see if it has any limits set per user if it is a home system, contact IT staff if it is a business with a server.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
July 10, 2018 at 05:00:16
I was told that the Ethernet card is the problem

Told by whom?

If you were told by someone you spoke with on your ISP's "tech support" line then chances are pretty good they don't have a clue what they're talking about.

How exactly are you doing a speedtest from the router?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
July 10, 2018 at 10:33:42
Thanks for the responses! I am such a "network novice" that I'm not sure what questions to ask... yet... so...

-Johnw: I'm not sure where to look for an "onboard port", or what to do with it if I find it.

-Fingers: I'll check the router... also, is an add-on card an external device? USB?

-Curt R: The tech that Spectrum sent out was able to get 190+ Mbs at the modem and
said that the problem is with my Ethernet card. It seems that it's integral with the Motherboard & there are no available slots for an add-on. "Geek Squad" said that a new Ethernet card will not fit the only slot in the case & suggested a "usb adapter". I bought a Netgear wireless adapter, installed the software, plugged it in & got the same 40Mbs down & 10 up. Returned the adapter this morning.
I've tried the "speakeasy", "ookla", spectrum speed test, etc, each with the Ethernet cable directly into my desktop and into the router. Same results, within a few Mbs each way.

message edited by rmccue


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#5
July 10, 2018 at 11:23:52
I should have also asked what package you're paying for. Which is to say, how much bandwidth? (ie; 100 Mbps, 1 Gig etc)

Even the so-called "technician" that Spectrum sent out could be at a very low level of knowledge and ability when it comes to troubleshooting network/hardware issues. Typically business' like that hire people with little or no skill/experience/training and give them on-the-job training with their gear. So all that means is, he/she only knows what they know and if the problem is outside their very narrow skill set, they'll tell you whatever and leave quickly so they don't look stupid or have to do any more work.

From where I'm sitting, the fact that you tried a USB adapter and got the same result tells me it's not your computer or any component of it. I would have recommended you buy a wired USB interface instead of wireless but I'd be willing to bet you'd get the same result if you used a wired one.


was able to get 190+ Mbs at the modem

Ok, the modem is different than the router unless you have one of those multifunction devices that is a modem, router and access point all in one. Personally, I don't like those very much. So knowing the above, I would suggest the tech connected to the modem directly with their laptop (as vs connecting to the router) and tested that way. You can do this too. If your internet package includes dynamic IP addressing (aka DHCP) then all you have to do is set your wired interface to get it's TCP/IP settings automatically (DHCP) and connect directly to the "internet out" port on the modem (should be connected to the "internet" port on your router). Chances are it's labeled and probably the only RJ-45 (network) port on the device.

If you're paying for a package that includes a static IP address you'll need to manually apply those settings (IP address, subnet mask, default gateway, DNS address etc) to network interface on your PC yourself and then plug it in on the modem and test.

Try that yourself, if you're able to connect (you should be able to) run a couple speed tests yourself. If your results are consistent with the tech's, then your router is most likely to be your issue.

So give it a try and let us know if you're able to connect directly with the modem and run a test.........and the results of course if you are...........and we'll go from there.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
July 10, 2018 at 15:54:48
"-Johnw: I'm not sure where to look for an "onboard port", or what to do with it if I find it"
Do you have 2 places you can plug the ethernet cable in to?
If you do, try both.

what is an ethernet card
http://bit.ly/2L12D49
what is an motherboard ethernet port
http://bit.ly/2KX9Z8L


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#7
July 10, 2018 at 18:04:33
If your wired and wireless speeds are the same then look elsewhere. They are two different adapters.

More likely your router is too slow to handle your connection.

What router are you using???


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#8
July 11, 2018 at 02:00:35
Other devices on your home network experience the same problem?
What server is speedtest.net using to measure your speed? Is it auto-detected? Ping delay value?

Have you tried connecting (with Ethernet cable) the computer directly to the MODEM LAN/WAN? (if modem and router are separate devices)

Any POXY server set on your internet settings?

message edited by sluc


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