Solved Why can't I access router config for a lan to lan router?

January 4, 2017 at 14:57:16
Specs: Windows 64
This configuration has been set up for a while and working great. I used this How To guide (Version 1): http://www.computing.net/howtos/sho...

I'm almost certain I set the second router to 192.168.0.2 (and I'm certain the first one is set to 192.168.0.1 - I can access those config settings.

But tonight no matter how hard I try I can't access that second router. Can I solve this without a factory reset? This post seems to address the same issue, but I can't quite understand the solution:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/4...


See More: Why cant I access router config for a lan to lan router?

Reply ↓  Report •


✔ Best Answer
January 6, 2017 at 12:45:28
Bummer!

Ok, first, confirm the LAN IP of the router connected directly to the internet. It should be 192.168.0.1 (or 192.168.1.1) Whatever it is, make note of it. Also, make note of your wifi SSID and encryption key. Then, do a factory reset on your secondary router returning it to factory defaults. Check the manual for info on how to do that, and then how to connect to it to configure once it's been reset.

After doing all that, reconfigure it as per my guide using the "LAN port to LAN port" scenario.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
January 4, 2017 at 20:44:13
It is possible you used a different IP address for the second router ending like .11 or .12 rather than .2 ;
You may be able to see what devices are connected to Router 1 when accessing router 1 config.
Since you know the set up you used and Router 1 is a known, just factory reset Router 2 and reset it all again, it should not take very long.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
January 5, 2017 at 04:05:40
You're right, it's going to be easiest to start from scratch. It's just mildly infuriating.

When I first started this process the second router was showing up in the... DHCP Client List (?- going from memory). By the end I couldn't find it anywhere. But it's not important. Thanks!


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
January 5, 2017 at 04:07:34
Before doing too much else you will want to recycle the power on the unit in question. Turn it off, count slowly to ten, then restart it and see if it isn't accessible.

Sometimes these low end routers can "loose their marbles" and a simple power reset can fix that. If that doesn't do the trick report back and we'll try something else.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 5, 2017 at 04:10:00
When I first started this process the second router was showing up in the... DHCP Client List (?- going from memory). By the end I couldn't find it anywhere. But it's not important. Thank

If you followed my guide, it won't show up in a DHCP list unless you've created an exclusion or reservation for that IP which I did not bother with as it's not worth it at this level. You may see the IP in your arp table. Open a command prompt window and type arp -a to see if it's listed there. The arp table will show IP and MAC address so you can just check the MAC on the label on the underside of router 2 to see if it's listed in the arp table. If it is, then you have it's IP. But do recycle the power on your router before doing anything else.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
January 5, 2017 at 04:15:38
I'll do the power cycle and then check the arp tables. I knew there should be a way to find its IP but I couldn't find it. It's confusing to me that I couldn't connect to it on a computer direct connected by Ethernet with wifi off and the Ethernet from router 1 completely removed. But if I assigned a strange IP then I guess I can see why that happened.

Your comment about DHCP jogged my memory on some other info. Recently totally reorganized offices and had to disconnect router 2. Last night when troubleshooting I realized Ethernet from router 1 was coming into the WAN port on router 2. I was probably seeing router 2 in the DHCP client list at that point.

It has been set up in this faulty config for about 2 weeks. I wonder if that's relevant? I guess the power cycle is still the first point of order.

message edited by clintium


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
January 5, 2017 at 08:46:49
The IP will only appear in the arp table if you've pinged it or possibly done a trace route to it as far as I know.


But if I assigned a strange IP then I guess I can see why that happened.

Yep, if you typo'd and entered 192.168.0.12 or 23 or something else, then you won't be able to access the router using 192.168.0.2

It has been set up in this faulty config for about 2 weeks. I wonder if that's relevant?

It will be relevant, yes.

Leave it setup as it is now. Reboot the router. If you can't access it, or ping it at 192.168.0.2 then move the network cable from the WAN port and put it in a LAN port and try pinging/accessing it again. If it works then it was just a simple matter of the cable being in the wrong port.

Last night when troubleshooting I realized Ethernet from router 1 was coming into the WAN port on router 2. I was probably seeing router 2 in the DHCP client list at that point.

Yep, makes sense. The WAN port will likely be set to DHCP and got a valid IP from the DHCP server in router 1 and that's why everything connected to router 2 is working.

I suspect just moving the plug to router 2 will fix the issue and it will be accessible at 192.168.0.2

I use my method (LAN port to LAN port - with static IP on LAN side of downstream router) so I always know what my IP is in case I need to access the router's management page. If I used the WAN port and DHCP, I probably wouldn't and then would run into the same issue as you're having. I use static IP assignments on a lot of stuff, printers, servers etc.

Let me know if you get it working!

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
January 5, 2017 at 14:55:23
Update:
I power cycled Router 2. Connected to my laptop with ethernet cable. Pinged 192.168.0.2, nothing. Moved ethernet from WAN to LAN of Router 2.

Again, I'm almost certain it was originally (over 1 year ago) set up at 192.168.0.1 and the ethernet was connected to Router 2 via LAN port. The swap to WAN happened in the past two weeks.


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
January 6, 2017 at 05:05:10
Moved ethernet from WAN to LAN of Router 2

What happened when you did this? You didn't say.............

:)

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Reply ↓  Report •

#9
January 6, 2017 at 05:10:58
Whoops. No update. Nothing changed. :(

Reply ↓  Report •

#10
January 6, 2017 at 12:45:28
✔ Best Answer
Bummer!

Ok, first, confirm the LAN IP of the router connected directly to the internet. It should be 192.168.0.1 (or 192.168.1.1) Whatever it is, make note of it. Also, make note of your wifi SSID and encryption key. Then, do a factory reset on your secondary router returning it to factory defaults. Check the manual for info on how to do that, and then how to connect to it to configure once it's been reset.

After doing all that, reconfigure it as per my guide using the "LAN port to LAN port" scenario.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Reply ↓  Report •

#11
January 6, 2017 at 13:06:11
Got it. Thanks again!

Reply ↓  Report •


Ask Question