Solved Which is a better connection...

Microsoft / HOME
October 24, 2020 at 08:26:08
Specs: Windows 10, 4096 D MMb
Which is a better connection...Ethernet or wi-fi? I've been using wi-fi connection for a while now and I'm thinking of switching to Ethernet. What would be the advantages/disadvantages of the one over the other. Thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
October 25, 2020 at 07:50:24
" I have installed ccleaner"

But do you use it? It has to be run manually & regularly. Once you run thru the Startup list & disable or delete the ones that aren't necessary, you can pretty much leave that section be, but the cleaner & registry scanner should be run regularly. I run the cleaner numerous times per day, almost every time I end a browsing session.

"I looked at all those apps but couldn't really make head or tail"

I can just about guarantee there are numerous apps on the list that you'll never use. Xbox for example. I recommend using Revo Uninstaller to uninstall them. There's no need to create a Restore Point & be sure to select Advanced mode. After the app's built-in uninstaller is done & Revo takes over, select & delete all the leftover files, folders, & registry entries on the pages that follow. You'll understand what I mean once you try it.
https://www.revouninstaller.com/

"I'm not using Windows Defender I'm primarily relying on AVG"

Get rid of AVG. It's unneeded & a waste of system resources. Use Windows Defender instead. If you feel it's inadequate, you can always reinstall AVG, but I doubt you'll find it's necessary.

You didn't comment on how you configured Windows logon. Did you provide an email address & setup a Microsoft account? If you did then you've given up a slice of your privacy & have also put your data at risk. If you didn't read the LifeWire link in my other response, I highly suggest you do so. Scroll down to the list of "Cons". The 1st on the list is this:

"Since your Microsoft account is stored on the internet, if it gets hacked, the hacker gains access to your computer and every Microsoft service you use."



#1
October 24, 2020 at 08:54:08
Ethernet hands-down. Faster, more secure, more reliable. Wifi is a "convenience" connection (no-wires).

https://enterprise.spectrum.com/sup...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#2
October 24, 2020 at 09:58:29

thanks for responding. I have switched to Ethernet, but I still find my laptop very lethargic... It takes forever to open a website once you have clicked on it. It is brand new with very little or no exposure to malware so I don't understand why this is the case. That's why I'm very tempted to go back to Win 7.

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#3
October 24, 2020 at 10:24:30
Which browser are you using? What are the (complete) specs of your laptop?

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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Related Solutions

#4
October 24, 2020 at 11:50:58
My experience is that some websites open very slowly
while others open quickly. Is that your experience?
If I recall correctly, computing.net pages have always
opened quickly for me. My own pages, with no cookies,
analytics or scripts and minimal CSS opened very quickly.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

message edited by Jeff Root


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#5
October 24, 2020 at 13:32:40
That could be part of my problem. I inherited Microsoft Edge but I heard so many negativity about it. So I downloaded Chrome and then Firefox. At present Firefox is my default browser. Maybe I should delete Chrome and Firefox and use Edge again. I'll post the specs tomorrow.

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#6
October 24, 2020 at 16:27:19
Firefox has generally been OK compared to the other windoze browsers?

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#7
October 24, 2020 at 16:30:15
You can have as many browsers as you want, there's no reason to remove Chrome or Firefox. If you're going to use Edge, make sure it's the new Edge (based on Chromium), not Edge Legacy.
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/edge

There's lots of things you can do to speed up Win10. Do you logon with a Microsoft account (email address) or a username like with Win7? If your logon is your email, you should consider changing to a local account (unless you like being spied on). There's more privacy with a local account plus it's more secure.
https://www.lifewire.com/local-vs-m...
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...

Did you uninstall all the bloatware that likely came pre-installed on the laptop? Did you uninstall all the Windows apps that you'll likely never use? There's about 30 of them to sort through.
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...

Are you using Windows Defender rather than an add-on anti-virus program? I recommend Windows Privacy Dashboard (WPD) to remove or disable all the Microsoft spyware, & CCleaner-Slim to manage startup apps, clean out the internet garbage & clean the registry.
https://wpd.app/
https://www.ccleaner.com/ccleaner/b...

message edited by riider


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#8
October 24, 2020 at 18:07:00
If connected by Ethernet, Is the WIFI switch off?
Working with both active can cause routing problems.

I don't have any speed problems with Edge browser.
Run speedtest.net with servers close to you and compare the results. Don't stare at one bad result, run multiple servers. If your ISP has a speedtest server, you should get very near to the subscribed speed.


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#9
October 25, 2020 at 03:29:56
Hi riider. I have installed Edge cromium version I believe. I have installed ccleaner. I looked at all those apps but couldn't really make head or tail from it so will first have to do research. So I'll see if this will help. I'm not using Windows Defender I'm primarily relying on AVG. Hold thumbs.

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#10
October 25, 2020 at 04:40:47
I wonder if AVG is part of the problem? Perhaps it’s hogging resources - which more than on virus app. has been known to do at tomes.

One very well known virus app went from being fast ‘ n furious to a real hog and caused (causes) much the situation you seem to have?


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#11
October 25, 2020 at 05:18:23
A wired solution will always out perform wireless.

Issues loading web pages could be the browser, could be your provider, or could be the server at the other end. The busier a server is, the slower it can respond to all requests.

Personally, I use Chrome for a web browser. I stopped using microsoft's offerings years ago and nothing I've seen in the interim has convinced me to go back. I'm not a fan of Firefox although I have installed on my work PC and use it for one or two things there.

I quit bothering with AVG some years back too as Windows Defender actually seems to work well.

Laptops tend to come with a lot of junk preinstalled. I'd so go through the list of installed applications and get rid of everyone you see that you don't use. If it's provided by the manufacturer of your laptop, you may want to stop it from loading instead of removing it completely. You can use any search engine to search "how do I stop [insert app name here] from loading at bootup. The less you have loading at bootup, the more of your resources (RAM) remains usable by other applications.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#12
October 25, 2020 at 06:26:20
Curt R wrote:

> Issues loading web pages could be the browser, could be
> your provider, or could be the server at the other end. The
> busier a server is, the slower it can respond to all requests.

Amplifying what I said above, my impression is that more than
98% of the time it is the web page itself that is slow. Not graphics,
not video, not the server, not the ISP, not the browser, not the
operating system, not the cache, not malware.

And not the HTML. I think it is mostly scripts trying to do things
that the browser or operating system were never designed to
execute.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
October 25, 2020 at 07:50:24
✔ Best Answer
" I have installed ccleaner"

But do you use it? It has to be run manually & regularly. Once you run thru the Startup list & disable or delete the ones that aren't necessary, you can pretty much leave that section be, but the cleaner & registry scanner should be run regularly. I run the cleaner numerous times per day, almost every time I end a browsing session.

"I looked at all those apps but couldn't really make head or tail"

I can just about guarantee there are numerous apps on the list that you'll never use. Xbox for example. I recommend using Revo Uninstaller to uninstall them. There's no need to create a Restore Point & be sure to select Advanced mode. After the app's built-in uninstaller is done & Revo takes over, select & delete all the leftover files, folders, & registry entries on the pages that follow. You'll understand what I mean once you try it.
https://www.revouninstaller.com/

"I'm not using Windows Defender I'm primarily relying on AVG"

Get rid of AVG. It's unneeded & a waste of system resources. Use Windows Defender instead. If you feel it's inadequate, you can always reinstall AVG, but I doubt you'll find it's necessary.

You didn't comment on how you configured Windows logon. Did you provide an email address & setup a Microsoft account? If you did then you've given up a slice of your privacy & have also put your data at risk. If you didn't read the LifeWire link in my other response, I highly suggest you do so. Scroll down to the list of "Cons". The 1st on the list is this:

"Since your Microsoft account is stored on the internet, if it gets hacked, the hacker gains access to your computer and every Microsoft service you use."


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#14
October 26, 2020 at 01:21:07
Sluc yes my wifi is off.

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#15
October 26, 2020 at 02:30:21
Hi Kurt. A question for you. If you use Windows Defender what do you use as your VPN protection or don't you use that.?

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#16
October 26, 2020 at 02:32:42
T-R-A a question for you. Does the quality/price/length of an Ethernet cable have an influence on its performance, i.e. slowing down or increasing your internet speed. Forget for a moment the effect of all the other factors.

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#17
October 26, 2020 at 02:44:10
Riider. You suggested I sign in with a Local Account. I changed it and I see a vast difference. Thanks.

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#18
October 26, 2020 at 03:02:23
Riider I have used the Wpd.app and disabled all that were listed. Hold thumbs.

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#19
October 26, 2020 at 03:05:13
Curt R Thanks for responding. I had just bought this new Dell and find a list of apps on it. Question is how do I decide which are not needed. That's problematic.

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#20
October 26, 2020 at 07:37:33
Dawie wrote:

> I had just bought this new Dell and find a list of apps on it.
> Question is how do I decide which are not needed. That's
> problematic.

Not problematic-- that's the fun part! Especially if you find an
app or two that you didn't know you needed until you try it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#21
October 26, 2020 at 07:43:55
Most apps don't take up significant space or resources if they
are installed but not used. You can leave them alone until you
want to use them / play with them. Others run at startup or try
to connect to the Internet or do other annoying things. You
should be able to ferret them out pretty easily.

-- Jeff, still in Minneapolis



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#22
October 26, 2020 at 08:09:06
Thanks Jeff. Highly appreciated for the assistance you guys have been giving me.

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#23
October 26, 2020 at 16:41:38
Quality of cables can sometimes matter; especially the the actual plug at either end. Cheapies may not be as firm a fit, or secure, or even properly crimped to the cable.

Longer runs of poor quality cable might affect performance; and the length limit is 100metres regardless.

Where possible pay the extra pennies and get decent cables.


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#24
October 27, 2020 at 05:06:58
Thanks T. Your advice is highly appreciated.

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#25
October 27, 2020 at 05:17:30
I may be too late but better late than never. Sorry for taking so long to reply. Too much going on. Hunting season (well, rifle season) starts on Sunday and I'm trying to get ready. For the first time ever, all 3 of my brothers and I are getting together to hunt so lots to do.........

Hi Kurt. A question for you. If you use Windows Defender what do you use as your VPN protection or don't you use that.?

I don't use a VPN normally as I have nothing to hide. I'm doing nothing illegal so have no worries in that area. I work in IT and we use a VPN for all remote users.........which is pretty much the entire staff now thanks to Covid-19 and on occasion when travelling, I'll use my work VPN. Typically, only when I wish to do some online banking. The VPN protects me from man in the middle attacks and such.

As to which apps you can remove........we use Dell in my workplace and our own custom images. They leave almost none of the Dell apps as part of the install. I would say this, if you don't use it, remove it. Any Dell app(s) which are used to update drivers might be worth keeping but anything else, you can toss if you won't be using it. BUT, you don't necessarily have to remove an app to prevent it from running in the background and using up memory. You can simply prevent it from loading on bootup. A quick google for "how to stop [app name] from loading at bootup" should give you what you need.


T-R-A a question for you. Does the quality/price/length of an Ethernet cable have an influence on its performance, i.e. slowing down or increasing your internet speed. Forget for a moment the effect of all the other factors.

I know this wasn't directed at me but I've pulled miles of cable and made more patch cables than you can shake a stick at. You needn't worry too much about the cabling.

There are two types of cables.........solid core and stranded. Solid is one solid piece of copper and typicallly a "plenum" grade of wire which we use to pull through walls/floors/ceilings. Stranded is multiple smaller strands of copper twisted together. The stranded is more flexible and better used for patch cables. As far as the ends go, there are also two types. RJ-45's meant for solid core and RJ-45's meant for stranded. I've never had an issue with the ends when using the correct ones for the cable type but have definitely had issues when using a stranded end on a solid core cable and vice versa. So if you're making your own cable, make sure you have the ends that match the cable type.

Typically though, most preterminated cables will work fine and cannot affect bandwidth unless they were poorly manufactured or poorly terminated. For instance, if an end isn't properly crimped you might only get 100 Mbps out of the cable (100 Mbps only uses wires 1,2, 3 and 6 - so if you don't get proper connection on wire 4, 5, 7 or 8, then you'll be restricted to 100 Mbps only).

Length definintely affects bandwidth. While rated for 100m, in my experience once you pass 85% (85m) you can begin to experience attenuation which will disrupt communication and cause issues.

Typically though, your LAN bandwidth these days will be 1 Gig (1000 Mbps) whereas most internet connections are 100 Mbps or less. So in most cases, your internet will be slower than your LAN so overall, cabling won't affect that.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#26
October 27, 2020 at 06:40:17
Curt. Thanks for the info on cables. Highly appreciated. Enjoy your hunting trip. Be careful hey!

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