Solved What are all these devices that showed up on the LAN scan?

Sony Bravia kdl-46ex700 46" lcd tv
June 22, 2014 at 05:55:02
Specs: Mac Mavericks (now), ?
"THESE" What is a cisco spvtg? I did a LAN scan of my network and at least 15 different one's showed up plus several other devices from netgear, ZyXEL, Motorola Mobility, ASUSTEK, Belkin, and COMPAL. I only use my Mac, an ipad, and my iphone in my home. I think my ex was quite busy when I was gone at work!! I have a restraining order out on him now since I found out he was a sociopathic deviant, but I'm certain that Sony smart t.v. he hung in my bedroom wasn't just for watching Netflix!! How do I stop this?? How do I prove he did something like this to my home? What do these devices do??? Help! He's hacked into everything I have, I've been cleaning everything (new accounts, passwords, OS, phone, locks, internet provider, etc.) for 3 months now! As far as I can tell, he was at it for over 6 months with free range to my home and passwords!i had no clue until after I kicked him out. I'm terrified of my tvs, computer, my phone, network, and even my son's PS3, and Wiiu!

message edited by Naivella


See More: What are all these devices that showed up on the LAN scan?

Report •


✔ Best Answer
June 23, 2014 at 10:12:47
Very valid point by Wanderer. I would however support CurtR's advice re' ensuring the router is protected with a suitable encrypted key (a new one); and also to change the SSID to something less obvious. And even better to actually hide the SSID - not to broadcast it (after carefully noting what it is and ensuring there is a hard copy, or record of it somewhere safe - and known to the poster only).

Equally with a little help from us pholks here possibly the lady can be encouraged to employ mac filtering too; as that is another (albeit basic) level of security; and the more the better?



#1
June 22, 2014 at 10:09:58
cisco spvtg = Cisco Service Provider Video Technology Group. It looks like a device for receiving TV and streaming media.

The other devices it is impossible to tell without more information. They could be Modems, routers, wif-adpators and network interface cards. Without knowing how your network is configured and what is connected to what it is impossible to tell/

Stuart


Report •

#2
June 22, 2014 at 12:48:28
Thanks, yeah I know it's not good at all. Anyone know how to sweep my house for this stuff??

Report •

#3
June 22, 2014 at 14:31:56
They do sound like adapters for wifi and/or cat-5/ethernet connections.

If you know how to access your current router settings you can go in and see what is actually connected via wifi. There will be (or ought to be) a "page" that will show current connections.

Do you know what make and model your router is?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 22, 2014 at 14:33:33
There is no sweep you can do to find network devices with the possible exception of wi-fi devices. Then it is easy to find out what wi-fi devices are connected by looking at the routers configuration. That should also tell you which hardware devices are connected. If you haven't already done so it is might be a good idea to change your wi-fi password in case he is lurking outside with a laptop.

If you are worried that you ex-partner has left something nasty behind the only thing you can do is to get someone in that knows about these things and get them to have a look. There are too many variables and possibilities to be able to do anything remotely.

Stuart

message edited by StuartS


Report •

#5
June 23, 2014 at 07:19:58
Is your wireless network protected by a strong encryption key (password)? Or is it unprotected and wide open for anybody to use?

If it's not protected, definitely configure an encryption key right now and reboot the router. In fact, while you're at it, change the SSID to something innocuous like that doesn't identify you personally.

If it is protected I would reset the router to factory defaults and I'd reconfigure your wireless network using a new SSID and strong encryption key.

In either case, this would prevent anybody from connecting to your wireless network.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#6
June 23, 2014 at 09:21:47
This is a case of misreading the information the scan provided. We have seen this before. Those are other wifi networks in your neighborhood that you are seeing. You have nothing to be afraid of.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#7
June 23, 2014 at 10:12:47
✔ Best Answer
Very valid point by Wanderer. I would however support CurtR's advice re' ensuring the router is protected with a suitable encrypted key (a new one); and also to change the SSID to something less obvious. And even better to actually hide the SSID - not to broadcast it (after carefully noting what it is and ensuring there is a hard copy, or record of it somewhere safe - and known to the poster only).

Equally with a little help from us pholks here possibly the lady can be encouraged to employ mac filtering too; as that is another (albeit basic) level of security; and the more the better?


Report •

#8
June 23, 2014 at 12:31:28
Yep limiting the ip dhcp pool and mac filtering are great and basic ways of making your router hardened which will lead a hacker to go elsewhere for easier prey.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#9
June 23, 2014 at 12:42:43
Really? A home LAN scan shows the neighborhood? That makes me feel a little better. My ex had set up his own network in my home resembling mine (airport express). I did all of what everyone suggested, not realizing that I was in fact joining his network. I'm signing up with a new internet provider today. Any suggestions to stay safe would be greatly appreciated!

Report •

#10
June 23, 2014 at 12:46:19
Thanks, any more tips? I'm starting with a new internet provider today. Setting it up makes me nervous as I have disconnected from wifi for about a month now. I do know he was somehow streaming to my computer. Not sure how, though.

Report •

#11
June 23, 2014 at 14:02:53
what activity did you see that makes you think he was streaming to your computer?

Security rules to follow:

Secure your router by;
changing the default password to something new and complex

password [both router and pc logon] example
I love dogs=iheartdogs=iH3ar!D0g$

change the routers wifi encryption to wpa2 and again use a complex passphrase.

For wifi passphrase example:
the brown fox jumped over water
in complex format would be:
Th3 br0wn f0x jump3d 0v3r H20!
The usage of caps, numbers and allowed special characters make it much harder to decipher.

Connect wired as much as possible and disable wifi interfaces when not in use. Bluetooth should also be disabled when not in use.

Download and install the free Bitdefender antivirus [one of the best on the market according to reviews]
Have the Windows firewall enabled

Be careful to only open email from people you know and don't open ones containing zip files or links to go click on. These are scams to hack your pc. Delete these emails.

Don't worry about your TV, Wii or PS3, These are devices that use internet but can't hack or infect your local network.

Practice safe computing. [google this phrase for more info]
https://ist.mit.edu/security/tips

I hope this helps

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's

message edited by wanderer


Report •

#12
June 23, 2014 at 14:37:35
Wanderer has given you excellent advice/guidelines re' passwords etc. and general security aspects; and both he and CurtR are well up on the whole field... I'm somewhat dated these days and no-longer quite so involved in networking as once was...

Incidentally a tip I got from a colleague at work some years back; and he is "not" an IT type - other than he knows how to use the basic kit and is aware of need of security measures.

Where allowed: use a full stop/period in your email account login name (if setting up a new one); and similarly in passwords...

Thus is the email logon was abcdef@mickey.com then perhaps make it abc.def@mickey.com

And if the password was perhaps: donald - make it do.nald

You see the idea... Possibly even use two full stops/periods spread out across the "name"? I have a pop3 email account set up two years ago using that approach. As my colleague advised... the likelihood of spam etc. is significantly reduced...; and similarly being hacked... Hackers will move on - if they even manage to start trying for your account; rather than waste time/energy. Unless they have a Kray or a bank of Sun systems they won't have the resources to generate an automated system to generate millions of possible account logons/passwords.

If NSA and/or GCHQ/Cheltenham (in the UK) really want into your affairs though... "they" will find their way...

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#13
June 23, 2014 at 16:56:51
I knew he was streaming because i would take random pics of things I didn't understand on my computer screen, which would be grey at the time, but when I looked at the actual pic on my phone I saw porn and one was actually the front of my fridge, which was directly where an old (and I thought inactive) cable line was.

Report •

Ask Question