Solved WDS (WinServer 2008) DHCP Problems

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November 11, 2014 at 18:59:04
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Hey Everyone,

At my school we repurpose lots of computers every day. Currently, we have a LAN set up with a server that runs WDS - allowing us to easily install Windows on many computers very quickly over the network. The server also hands out dynamic IPs when we connect a computer to the network.

The problem is that we aren't able to connect the LAN to the outside school network. Whenever we attempt to have the computers online as well as the WDS server, the school's router shuts down.

Being able to go online with the computers would make the install process much more efficient, as it would allow us to install & activate Windows without having to disconnect the computers and set them up again elsewhere.

So, the questions:

What do you think the issue is? Do you think that because we have two DHCP servers (the WDS & the schools) there are duplicate IPs being handed out, and it is confusing the router?

To be honest, I'm not entirely sure why we have to have our own DHCP server on the WDS server (I'm not the one who set it all up). Might it be that the server needs to know which IPs to send the data to, and thus has to hand out the IPs itself? I'm not entirely sure that this is the problem, since we use Multicasting to send out the data to groups of computers on the network, it doesn't seem like it necessarily has to know the IPs except maybe to conserve network bandwidth...

Would the solution be as simple as setting the scope of the WDS/DHCP to 192.168.0. and the scope of the school DHCP to 192.168.1. etc, etc...?

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#1
November 12, 2014 at 21:12:12
✔ Best Answer
Having two DHCP servers is likely to create issues, and is totally unnecessary. But without more info on how the two DHCP servers are setup, there's no way to say what's actually causing the issue you're experiencing.

Would the solution be as simple as setting the scope of the WDS/DHCP to 192.168.0. and the scope of the school DHCP to 192.168.1. etc, etc...?

Unless you create a supernet, that won't help. All you'd end up with is two separate subnets that don't speak to each other.

If I were going to setup a LAN with two DHCP servers (and I wouldn't) here's what I'd do.

Router:
LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

DHCP Enabled = Yes
Scope: 192.168.0.50 to 192.168.0.150
Client Default Gateway: 1921.68.0.1
Client DNS: 192.168.0.1

WDS Server:
LAN IP: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

DHCP Enabled = Yes
Scope: 192.168.151 to 192.168.250
Client DG: 192.168.0.1
Client DNS: 192.168.0.1

This way, both DHCP servers are handing out IP's within the same subnet but there is no crossover of IP's (ie: no possible duplicates). Also, all clients are getting the correct DG/DNS

I still think in the long run, your best bet is to let your router do the DHCP for all clients. This takes less setup and also makes troubleshooting issues easier and quicker.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#2
November 13, 2014 at 05:06:14
I'd have to disagree with the recommendation of letting the router be the DHCP server. In a Windows Server network it is far better (IMO) to give that responsibility to one or more of the DCs. Windows tends to provide better error reports than a router, and it is useful to have the DHCP server register clients with the DNS server (which almost certainly needs to be one of the DCs). It is also easier to configure DHCP on the server, and it tends to be more versatile.

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#3
November 13, 2014 at 13:04:23
LOL - See and I disagree with using a DC for DHCP because I've always felt it best to offload any/all services you can from the DC(s) as is possible. Thus leaving your DC's doing their main duty (ie: domain controller & DNS) and not wasting CPU cycles on services like DHCP which can easily be handled by other servers. At least, this always seemed logical to me.

In a perfect world, I'd have a dual redundant DC's and at least one standalone member server which would handle all things like DHCP, email etc.

But I definitely agree that a SOHO router isn't the best solution in any but a home environment for the same reasons ijack mentions above (ie: reporting, scalability, registration etc) But for a home environment, a SOHO router is going to be good enough for most people since it's the main connection to the internet and it's a lot easier to let it do DNS/DHCP. A lot of people (like perhaps this OP) get confused trying to figure out how to offload DHCP from the router to another device.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
November 13, 2014 at 13:37:40
Dhcp on the server can auto update the DNS server which a router can't do.

Router should have a system log. You should review it as to determine why the router shut down.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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