W7 - Onboard NIC disallows USB Wifi adapter t

Dell / NA
March 28, 2011 at 14:48:26
Specs: any, any
I have an HP W7 (Home Premium) PC.

I have a wired connection (on-systemboard network interface) to a Belkin 54g router, but the router is not physically connected to the internet (no ethernet cable out to a cable modem/whatever). The router connects several necessary peripherals - mostly wirelessly to the main PC and another W7 PC.) All this stuff worked prior to a move to a new location.

There is freely accessible Wifi in range (public library - wherein I could concievably carry the whole PC and use their WiFi with their blessing).

I attached a USB Wifi adapter to the PC to avail myself of the free service, but W7 will not allow the Wifi adapter to be seen until I detach the ethernet wire. Then it will allow me to see the available network, and connect.

How does W7 (or the system board) look at network? Are they (onboard NIC and USB)
mutually exclusive? Do I need a separate ethernet adapter card or a separate USB adapter card to create a different "channel" that would allow the two networks to coexist?

Be nice to one another, okay?


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#1
March 28, 2011 at 17:28:44
Only one interface is supposed to be used at a time. Why do you need a wired connection when you are using wireless?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
March 28, 2011 at 18:09:55
In the previous location of this setup, part of the lease included attachment to the in-house network. In this new location, it was suggested that we could use the the free Wifi, given the relatively low bandwidth we needed.

Besides, Guapo, the question is still valid. In previous older systems and OSes, one could link to more than one network at a time, and with the proper software (network server software), you might even route, or provide a gateway. What is this "Only one interface is supposed to be used at a time" stuff? Where's the geek spirit?

Anyway mark this topic "unanswered" for the moment.

Be nice to one another, okay?


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#3
March 29, 2011 at 07:07:54
While it's all possible & has been done before, Windows is not good at dual interfaces. Maybe someday that will change.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#4
April 4, 2011 at 05:36:23
Friends and Fellow Geeks,

Thank you for the responses and suggestions.

I find that struggling to frame a question that won't take you and me down long side paths and clarifications, actually helps order my thought processes in thinking about solving the problem. Other times, it reminds me of how much there is to know out there, and without good technical support (that's you folks!), I would be adrift at sea. Then someone smacks me on the head with an oar, and and says, Snap Out Of It!, and I proceed to the solution.

Ultimately, the solution for me included running an ethernet cable from the non-internet-connected router to the second PC, setting up static IP's for that network, killing the gateway and dns for them, and letting the wireless usb adapters do their thing for the wifi internet access.

The brain-fart had been that I was trying to force two networks on one adapter on the second PC - what was I thinking? Some times I need that smack upside the head.

Thanks again.

G00k

Be nice to one another, okay?


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