Solved Using a Switch in LAN situation

Dell corporation / Inspiron 7720
May 14, 2014 at 18:02:07
Specs: Windows 8.1 64-bit, Intel i7 3630QM, 8Gb DDR 1600
Yet again another post, but we're all in need of information aren't we ;)

Anyway, My question is this: Because my home SOHO router recently died (i.e died 4hrs ago), I had to take my secondary router and put it in it's place. Now without a router for my little LAN net in the back room with all my legacy machines. I have doubts about this, but could I use my old Baystacks 350F network switch in it's place? I don't know how it would work connectivity-wise between systems without any DCHP ip-assignment available. Guess I could try, but it'd take a bit to get everything hooked up.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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✔ Best Answer
May 23, 2014 at 13:16:53
Once I set a static IP on each machine in the loop (i've been busy for awhile, just now got around to it) it worked fine. Actually seems to have less lag than the old SOHO i was using.

I'll stick around the local sales and look for cables. Somehow, ALL of my serial stuff has disappeared...

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq



#1
May 14, 2014 at 18:48:47
You probably didn't need two routers in the first place. The switch should work.

The world is full if rats, Republicans & Democrats.


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#2
May 14, 2014 at 19:22:58
Well no, see, they were two separate networks. The front, internet-connected LAN is completely separated from the closed loop LAN in the back. No interaction whatsoever. My question is that would the machines on the separate net communicate properly without a DCHP?

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#3
May 14, 2014 at 19:59:33
It should work if you give them all static IPs on the same subnet.

The world is full if rats, Republicans & Democrats.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 15, 2014 at 07:09:40
I'm thinking that's a layer 2 switch (routing is done at layer 3) and if I'm correct, then you would still require a router between it and your first network (router) if you want to have everything connected to the Baystack on a separate subnet.

I have an older Baystack 450 at home and it is only layer 2 and while I could segregate everything connected to it from the first network using VLAN's, I wouldn't be able to have internet access on machines plugged into it without a router. If however that is an L3 switch, then you could do this easily by configuring a new VLAN for your segregated network and putting VLAN 1 in the same network as the router.

If you wanted all your computers on the same subnet it would be easy as pie to setup. Just return the Baystack's config to default and give it an IP in the same range as the router (to enable remote access to the switch - not absolutely necessary) and then connect it to a LAN port on the router.

On an aside....the switches I use here at work are Avaya. Avaya bought them from Nortel. Nortel bought them from Baystack. Oddly enough, the CLI and telnet menu structure are still mostly the same as the 350/450's but with more options and such. Personally, I like them more than any others I've worked with over the years.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
May 15, 2014 at 20:10:05
As far as I know it's only layer 2. But I can't seem to find the serial cable for management connection, and even then I don't know if I could access it, it came 2nd hand from a school network and it most likely has a password.

Again, not entirely sure about it's config, but I'll set static IP's for all the computers and see what happens when I wire them up.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#6
May 16, 2014 at 08:47:53
I'm pretty sure a straight serial cable will work. I'd suggest you get one and try. It should have female (db9) connectors on each end.

If that doesn't work, let me know. I have a couple at work I made myself that definitely work on the Avay's and worked on them when they were Nortel. I suspect they'll work on a Baystack as well. I could peel the electrical tape off one end and give you the pinout. for them.

Once you have a working console cable it's simple enough to reset it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
May 23, 2014 at 13:16:53
✔ Best Answer
Once I set a static IP on each machine in the loop (i've been busy for awhile, just now got around to it) it worked fine. Actually seems to have less lag than the old SOHO i was using.

I'll stick around the local sales and look for cables. Somehow, ALL of my serial stuff has disappeared...

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#8
May 23, 2014 at 13:51:48
I'm glad to hear it's working well!

You should still be able to pick up a serial cable from most computer stores I'd think. To be honest, I haven't checked in a long time. I have noticed that fewer and fewer new computers/laptops come out with a serial plug on them. I had to buy a USB to Serial connector for my work laptop to use in conjunction with my serial cable in order to connect to unconfigured switches.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
May 23, 2014 at 14:42:12
I'm also going to have to get some new 40mm fans for this thing too. Current fans are starting to go out, and it's noisy as heck.

Staples seems to still have a rather good stock of DB9 cables on their website, and there's always Amazon. I'll let you know.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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