Unix Executable Files

Apple / Mac pro1,1
March 13, 2009 at 08:37:27
Specs: Macintosh 0SX version 10.4.11
We are running OS X Version 10.4.11 for our Graphics
but the rest of the company is on PCs using windows.
We share files back and forth over a network. Lately
any Mac generated file, especially fonts and Quark files that pass through the network come up as Unix Executable Files when a Mac user tries to open them again.
Usually I can guess what kind of file it is by the file
name and adding the extension to the Unix file once it
is on the Mac will open it - but what do I do about
fonts or files I cannot guess? We have a huge Quark
catalog that was collected and stored on the network
and now all those fonts have turned into Unix
Executable files. Any help would be appreciated.
Connie

See More: Unix Executable Files

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#1
March 13, 2009 at 08:57:56
There is nothing "passing thru the network" that will change file.

It would appear you have a problem with your file associations on the MAC though it is not clear from your post what part the pcs play in the transfer.


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#2
March 13, 2009 at 09:08:39
this is what I have found about the problem so far.

UNIX has file permissions. When you store a file like this on
Windows, Windows puts this file into a Windows filesystem
that does not always know what to do with UNIX file
permissions - the results will probably vary between what
version of Windows you are using.
Windows is changing your file permissions.

I think that as long as you make files on a Windows host
available to your Mac via a Windows "share" you will have
this problem - Quark, Word etc. has a hairball with any file
that has executable permissions turned-on, AND Windows is
totally incapable of turning-off executable permissions.
That's one BIG reason Windows is so darn insecure; you
can't just remove the execute permission, so people hide
executable code in files that a reasonable person would think
should not contain executable code.

Now, there are other alternative ways to use a Windows host
to behave as a file server for other operating systems.
The method you are currently using is Microsoft's proprietary
CIFS (Common Internet File System).
The other method is the Open systems (every other
computer but Microsoft) NFS (Network File System). This
was developed by Sun Microsystems and is tha "standard"
way for doing file sharing.

Microsoft offers a few different ways to make their O/S run
NFS. The free way is to download SFU (Services For UNIX
from Microsoft. The other good thing about SFU is that it
runs on XP Pro, a tad bid cheaper than Server 2003.
_______

any comment?


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#3
March 13, 2009 at 09:55:35
That all sounds well and good but does not address this statement

"Lately any Mac generated file, especially fonts and Quark files that pass through the network come up as Unix Executable Files when a Mac user tries to open them "

Permissions have nothing to do with file extensions [associations] changing.

Being graphic files I would not expect any exe extensions.

The above statement also says that its mac to mac.

So how are the pcs involved?
How do these files show up on a pc?
Are you using a PC to convert them to pc format and then convert them back so the macs can read them?


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Related Solutions

#4
March 13, 2009 at 10:29:40
HI,

The Graphics team initiates the project in Quark. The files
are saved on a non MAC "server", that is more storage than
processor, through a network that is accessed by both PCs
and MACs. The PC people can see the files and open them
but when a Mac user tries to open the file after it has been on the "server" the warning box comes up and states "There is no default application specified to open the document." If someone remembers what program the file was created in Mac People can open it if they drag it to the desktop and add the appropriate file
extension. But no one has found a way to access the fonts
that have also been converted to a Unix Executable File.


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#5
March 13, 2009 at 12:00:31
What is the "server" OS and patch level?
What is the extension when saved on the "server"?
What program do pc users use to open the files?


I would suggest a quick experiment.

Save a mac file on the server, do not access the file via a pc, open it on another mac. Does it open?


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#6
March 13, 2009 at 14:50:56
Might try a suitable compression tool such as zip, bzip, tar that can contain the entire file with unique permissions. Otherwise you'd have to setup a Mac file server or other system that can natively support extended attributes.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#7
March 14, 2009 at 18:21:11
Did you miss the part of it was working and now it's not? Suggestion doesn't address the issue.

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#8
March 14, 2009 at 19:58:01
Just in case it will help, Mac OS X has a FreeBSD terminal built in to it.

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#9
March 15, 2009 at 06:31:46
Usually I can guess what kind of file it is by the file
name and adding the extension to the Unix file once it
is on the Mac will open it - but what do I do about
fonts or files I cannot guess? We have a huge Quark
catalog that was collected and stored on the network
and now all those fonts have turned into Unix
Executable files.

Ok, does the files being made executable stop your software from opening them?

If the only problem is that they're all being made executable, it's easy enough to change that. Open a terminal window on your Mac, navigate (in the terminal window) to the folder the files are stored in and remove the "x" from them as follows:

chmod -x *

The issue is likely a result of confusion between the Unix based OS X and windows. Windows depends on the file extensions to decide on what type of file a file is. If it's a .exe then it's executable. If it's .doc it's a document. If it's .txt it's an ASCII text file.

Could it be the file extensions causing your issue? I'm not very familiar with OS X and Mac's. But I do know UNIX and Linux as well as Windows. What file extensions are being put on the files created?

All I know for sure is, most of our servers are Linux or UNIX based and I save files on them all day long from Windows based PC's using XP and I've yet to have a similar problem. In fact, I frequently move files between Windows, UNIX and Linux....the same file....and perm's don't change.

The only thing I see different from my situation and yours is the Mac OS. So perhaps it's the Mac's themselves, or the software you're running on them to work on the files.


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