Two DSL connections,Two routers: Cannot see devices

January 10, 2016 at 04:43:31
Specs: Windows 7
Hi Guys, Its been a long two days reading posts to try and figure out this problem. Unfortunately I am still doing something wrong and need your help please. I have two different DSL routers and each has its own DSL connection. They serve two different networks that needs to access the devices on both networks and visa verse. R1 is configured as DHCP server on IP 191.168.16.20 (range from 21 to 254) and R2 is configured to have DHCP disabled on IP 191.168.16.18. Both are on the same subnet. I have a switch on either side connected via CAT 5 and each router is in turn connected to the switches via cat 5. Each network can see the devices linked to their router, but I cant seem to get them to see the devices on the other router. Your assistance would be much appreciated.

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#1
January 10, 2016 at 06:16:28
191.168.16.20

Is that a typo? Did you mean the private non-routable 192.168.0.0 subnet?

I think we need to get the subnetting figured out before we can help you. How many IP addresses do you need? Is there a specific need for two separate subnets? Please detail exactly what it is you're trying to accomplish.

Off the top of my head, I would recommend you get a dual WAN router that is made to have two external connections plugged into it. In addition to all the routing, they typically will also load balance for you.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#2
January 10, 2016 at 21:07:40
Also: Instead of having some devices plugged into each router, use one large switch and have all devices including both routers (or better, dual router) into it and all devices will have better connection to each other and the router(s) will serve DHCP and connection(s) to outside the network.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
January 11, 2016 at 00:54:49
Hi Curt,

Thank you for your reply. You are correct. was a typo. Should be 192 but they are both on 255.255.255.0. The reason why I have two routers is because it is two separate buildings next to each other. I was able to get the two routers to see each other and the devices on them if i disable the DHCP on both. I enabled the DHCP on the NAS, but now the network is only making use of the internet connection on R1. The internet connection on R2 is not used. As soon as I change the gateway on R2 to make use of the second internet connection, i lose connectivity to the other network


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Related Solutions

#4
January 11, 2016 at 09:57:27
The reason why I have two routers is because it is two separate buildings next to each other

Ahhh........ok this makes sense now! :)

So let's see what we have and what will be the best way to make use of it. I'm going to have to make an assumption or two, so please fill in any details I get wrong.

Situation:

- Two separate buildings, each with their own network including SOHO Router and switch
- You wish to have both separate physical locations to be on the same network (subnet).

I'm going to assume you have either:
a) a dedicated link (wired/wireless) between locations
or
b) you have a VPN setup between the two.

Since you have two separate routers and two separate locations the simplest solution I see would be to run DHCP at each location and split your DHCP scope between the two, Here's what I mean:

Subnet to use:
192.168.16.0/24

Site 1:
Router Config:
LAN IP: 192.168.16.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.16.50 to 192.168.16.125
Client Default Gateway and DNS IP = 192.168.16.1

Site 2:
Router Config:
LAN IP: 192.168.16.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
DHCP Enabled = Yes
DHCP Scope = 192.168.16.126 to 192.168.16.200
Client Default Gateway and DNS IP = 192.168.16.2

This puts both routers and their DHCP IP's all within the same subnet. All clients will be able to talk to each other (regardless of physical location) and each location's external traffic will be passed through the router located at that site.

This also gives you a pool of reserved IP's for things like servers or printers. The pool of IP's used by DHCP for clients can be adjusted as needed or if you need more than is available at /24, you could supernet it to /23 and adjust as necessary.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#5
January 12, 2016 at 07:16:36
Hi Curt, I really appreciate your help. I have a Cat 5 link running between the two buildings currently, but I am setting up a wireless link as a backup plan. We have a lot of lightning and if the wireless link can maintain similar speeds I will rather choose to implement the wireless solution. I will definitely try your IP settings on the routers, but I have to wait until the weekend. I do not want to take the chance to interrupt communications during the week. I will provide feedback asap.

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