Trying to get wifi to existing metal shop 100' away

January 21, 2019 at 05:36:10
Specs: Windows 7
I have a new Metal shop built near my home. I call it the black hole, because every signal is lost when entering my shop. In the summer, its fine, I can receive wifi signal as well as cell. But in the winter, when I close my roll up door, nothing. As it stands, our cell service is horrible in our area, so I have purchased a M-Cell from ATT that works amazing. It isn't until I walk to the back of my property )approx 1 acre) away from the M-Cell, that the service gets weak and drops calls. My shop is well within the range of the M-Cell, but inside the black hole, it falls to nothing.

I currently have Direct TV genie and after talking to the Rep, he mentioned using wifi calling. I did plan ahead and have 1" conduit inside the slab to my shop. I could easily pull any wires and hard wire it to my existing Direct TV genie out to my shop. The Wire run would be approx 200' or less, given the wall and attic layout.

Cell service would be a plus, but if I can get wifi to my shop, use wifi calling on my android, then I'll at least be able to get calls when walking into my shop. If I'm think about this correctly. I have looked into wifi calling and it appears that my android phone will work with wifi calling.

So if it is possible for me to hard wire any "adapter" or "device" that will enable me to have wifi within my metal building, I'm all ears. I would rather take the time to pull the wires and have a direct connection, than wireless on an already drained wireless network.


See More: Trying to get wifi to existing metal shop 100 away

Report •

#1
January 21, 2019 at 06:22:34
As you have a conduit already buried between shed and main building and it's a run well under 300metre s (330ft) I would opt for a quality cat-6 cable inside that conduit terminating in a network port inside the shed. The other end similarly somewhere adjacent to your router.

You install a router in the shed and configure it be both wifi and of ethernet - the cat-6 cable is the link between the house router and the shed router. You connect the house router to that shed cable termination point in the house of course...

Hopefully when you buried the conduit you did include a pull string/draw rope or whatever inside it? That rope allows you to attach a cable to it at one end and easily pull the cable through to the other end. If you didn't then you are going to need a lot of "fishing rod" as used by installers to pass cable through buried pipes... although you might be able to push the cat-6 through if the run is straight and reasonably smooth inside the conduit...


Report •

#2
January 21, 2019 at 06:57:09
trvlr

"300metre s "

Bit of a typo!?!? You meant 100 m (328')

:)

Don't get hung up on Cat6. Take a look and if you can find Cat5e for better price than Cat6, it will do the job just as well as Cat6. I haven't purchased any cabling in a while now...........well, copper, I've been pulling more fiber backbone at work here but that's beside the point.......LOL........but I suspect there may still be a significant price difference between Cat5e and 6

I would look for outdoor grade cable............NOT plenum grade (indoor). Regardless of the conduit, you want outdoor grade. It has a much stronger, harder, heavier casing and if you live somewhere cold like I do (Western Canada) you'll want the stuff packed with grease. It's a PITA to work with because of the grease, but will outlast anything else and won't degrade like plenum grade should it get wet or freeze.

Also, see if you can't find a place that will sell you the length you need (I recommend getting 250', you can always cut it down when it's pulled) as compared to buying a box.

I would look for a "fish tape" The one I have at work here is 300 feet at least. I have some "fish rods" but they're in 6' segments and there's only 10 in a package. You'd need a lot of them. Depending on what's in the conduit already, you may be able to pull a light twine through with a balloon. I had to do that on a 200 meter run of 2" under-slab conduit........worked like a charm. I didn't use an actual balloon though, a piece of a plastic bag worked just fine. You need a decent vacuum with good suction for this to work. Just make sure at the far end from where you're starting the twine, you have the vacuum sealed well on the conduit.

I had to pull a light twine, then use the twine to pull the rope I used to pull the cable. If it's a straight run from house to shop, a light twine should do the trick. But if you have any turns in there (especially 90's) they stack up drag fast and you don't want your twine to break mid-pull. Btdt and it sucks........lol

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#3
January 21, 2019 at 08:15:52
Yes on the conduit with a string in it and I also have a fish tape if the matter requires it. Its basically a straight shot with a long radius 90 on both ends. very easy to pull a single strand through 1" conduit.

My question is, what all will i need? This is someone greek to me, so from what I gather, plug Ethernet cable into existing port on Direct Tv router, run Ethernet cable out to shop through the conduit. I could do the 250' and roll up the excess, that wouldn't be a problem. Now I'm sitting with 1 end of the Ethernet cable in my shop.......

I think what your saying is that I'll need a secondary device or router to plug my Cat cable into?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 21, 2019 at 09:13:24
While the maximum segment length for Cat5e/6 is 100 m (328') I find that once you hit about 85% of that, you can start having attenuation issues. So keeping under that 85% as much as possible is best. 250' is just under 85% and should be safe enough but I might drop it back to say 220' if that's enough to reach and still leave you some slack to work with at both ends.


"I think what your saying is that I'll need a secondary device or router to plug my Cat cable into?"

Yes, definitely. You'll want another SOHO router that has wireless capability. That or a router and a wireless access point.

As for how to connect, you would want the one end to plug into the same router your internet connects to. The other end will go into a router in the shop. For instructions on how to set that up, click on this link:

https://www.computing.net/howtos/sh...

and read my howto guide for adding a second router. You'll want to read the "Version 1" (single subnet) section wherein you connect the two routers in a "LAN port to LAN port" configuration.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


Report •

#5
January 21, 2019 at 15:01:19
erm yes... that ought to have been 100metres...

Must take less water and more vodka next time...

I would look for a "fish tape" The one I have at work here is 300 feet at least. I have some "fish rods" but they're in 6' segments and there's only 10 in a package. You'd need a lot of them. Depending on what's in the conduit already, you may be able to pull a light twine through with a balloon. I had to do that on a 200 meter run of 2" under-slab conduit........worked like a charm. I didn't use an actual balloon though, a piece of a plastic bag worked just fine. You need a decent vacuum with good suction for this to work. Just make sure at the far end from where you're starting the twine, you have the vacuum sealed well on the conduit.

Some neat ideas there. I forgot about a flexible fish tap (round or flat version)... I've had mixed results with those in the past; but generally OK if straight runs or very minor bends. When I used to design conduit/cable runs in the past for AV studios etc. the rule of thumb was no more than two bends at any time - ideally one if possible - before an accessible pull point. And yes pull a fine "thread" through first and then draw a second heavier and then the cable. Ideally leave a draw string in the conduit - long enough to go either way - should the need ever arise to run more cables...

Often pholks pull a cable thorough a cable run with string and forget to leave the string in place...; and later wish they had the left string in place...

I like the ballon/plastic bag idea... Très novel method...

I suggested cat-6 so as to future proof the installation; but agree that cat-5e is fine. I concur with the outdoor cable as a minimum. If he's not in the sunny climes of Western Canada - it does get very sunny there at times I know; I lived there on/off for a wee spell - then likely the super duper grease insulated may not be necessary.


Report •

#6
January 24, 2019 at 08:34:52
Ok little update, I was able to take my old router and make it an access point for my Direct TV router by way of a very nice youtube video. I named it ******* Shop. Same password and everything, just an access point. Now when I sign into my wifi, both my wifi and the wifi shop are accessed.

So now it seems I just need to get the wire and run it out there to verify everything works. You mentioned the cat5e to save a little $$$. I see a few different ones, 1 being waterproof. being that I will have the wire in conduit and buried, is there any reason to go waterproof wire? Or do i need a specific cat5e or cat6 line?

message edited by SDupontJr


Report •

#7
January 24, 2019 at 09:11:18
If pennies allow I would go with highest quality. So waterproof would be my choice and cat5e as cat5e will be a wee bit cheaper than my initial suggestion of cat6.

One can never be fully sure that underground conduit (especially if plastic/pvc) won’t crack or otherwise suffer damage and allow water ingress.


Report •

#8
January 24, 2019 at 10:28:20
Does it matter if the conduit is buried in a concrete slab? i'm sure moisture "could" get in, but not like if the conduit were buried in the back yard. But what do I know. lol

Report •

#9
January 24, 2019 at 12:12:41
Mmm true if under or within concrete the chances of water ingress are likely somehat remote...

But one never knows just what the pesky microbes might get upto; especially the concrete munching types..., and even worse if they regard plastic/pvc a desert...

At least go for exterior grade cable?

If it does get damaged anon, then you can of course rerun it; which is a good reason to ensure that you leave a draw string in place with whichever cable you run.


Report •

#10
January 26, 2019 at 04:57:25
Trust me, even within concrete, water can get in. I have several under-slab conduits that had to be abandoned because they magically filled with water. And these are conduits inside a building.

Better to get the proper grade wire to start with than to have to replace it in a couple years.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#11
January 26, 2019 at 08:05:38
Have to admit,I would go for truly waterproof cable. Rerunning cables at any time is a PIA, especially if I buried conduits... Cable ducts, as used indoors, are a little easier in that respect, but still a PIA if the duct is long and well populated already.

In this situation, if I had enough spare cable, I’d run a second cable when running the intended single cable... May come in useful anon..

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#12
January 28, 2019 at 02:22:10
Thanks alot. I'll get this ordered and see what happens.

Report •

#13
January 28, 2019 at 14:21:16
You could use the second cable for a land line phone feed from the house; or even install a separate phone cable - again waterproof.... Often one can buy phone cable by the yard (metre if submitting to the EEC demand to abandon imperial and adopt/use their system...).

Relying on cordless phones, or even just mobile/cell phones only is a mistake.

When mains power goes down and one is using only cordless phones - no plugp in types - one loses the phone service; even though the phone company is still providing it to the home/office. Always have a plug in phone in house (ideally in the bedroom at least, and adjacent to the kitchen too if possible). Phone companies are legally obliged to maintain the volts required for a specified period in event of power outs wherever.

And in a metal shed of course cell/mobile phones won’t work due to the signal being blocked by the metal... So again a wired phone is a useful option...


Report •

Ask Question