This router config doesnt' work on my set up

May 27, 2020 at 06:32:48
Specs: Cisco Router 2 number 2
My errors are:

The IP address and the gateway can't be the same.


The Router IP address equals to the subnet address. Please correct it.


See More: This router config doesnt work on my set up

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#1
May 27, 2020 at 06:55:42
What make/model is your router?

Do you have the idiot's guide (the Manual)?

Have you ever had it correctly setup?

Exactly what are you attempting to do?


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#2
May 27, 2020 at 06:58:59
Well, it would make it easier for us to help you if we had some more info:
1) Router make/model?
2) what are you trying to configure the router for (extend and existing LAN, add wireless, connect LAN to internet?


The IP address and the gateway can't be the same.

Are you trying to configure the external (internet) interface of the router? Typically that's DHCP, but if it's static, then your ISP will supply you with your TCP/IP settings and you enter those on the external interface.

As for the LAN interface of your router.....it's going to depend on the router itself. My SOHO router only allows me to edit the actual IP address and subnet mask of the LAN side. It handles the routing between internal/external itself.

The Router IP address equals to the subnet address

Your subnet mask defines the network and is different from the IP address. You can't use the subnet mask for an IP address and you can't use an IP address for a subnet mask.
Example;
IP Address: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

Make sure you're entering the correct info into the correct spot

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
May 27, 2020 at 07:42:31
Thanks guys.

I have an Arris DG3450 as my number 1 router at (192.168.0.1), the 2nd router is an older one "cisco" (aka linksys) with model number WRT160Nv2.I have a 3rd router I discuss below.

With the Cisco Router:

1. I immediately update the firmware after resetting completely.
2. I have tried this guide here (on this page) using method 1. I need to assign it .192.168.0.2 (OK That works for the router IP on my LAN)

But I cannot add the default gateway AND router IP (to route traffic to the main router at 192.168.0.1

I DID set the Default gateway to .198 AND i can get it to work on my iPad, but as soon as my son's windows laptop hooks up to it, it says wrong config and wont connect to WAN.

SO, I have one more router at the other side of the house which I have not determined which IP. It is serving DHCP but it's newer and I need to get it's info. Its hooked up to a small non-managed hub.

I did this:

On the cisco router 2, I put it's DHCP to a small range that NO other IPs have in my LAN. Also, I set the wireless channel to 6 and my Arris to 3, so they don't conflict.

What am I trying to even do? We have a dead spot in the middle of the house. My Arris (main internet router) is on a FAR SIDE and the other router 3 (which I will dig up the model and IP so I can confirm it's IP and DHCP) is on the other side of the house.

I am attempting to hook up what I'm calling router 2 (the old cisco/linksys) to the middle part of the home to cover the living room and back patio where there is very little wifi signal.

I hope that helps.

I am a web developer of 25 years, so I have some knowledge of networking. not an expert by any means, I'm more comfortable configuring a server than a router :( I do have 2 1Us in the closet but I don't run them right now.

We have probably 25 devices on our LAN.

See this linksys config screen (ignore the IP of 198, I have it at .0.2 now) https://www.dropbox.com/s/jm7trbku0...

Here is my LAN connected device table (this doesn't appear to be any security risk posting this image): https://www.dropbox.com/s/wi1q971bb...

Thanks for any help!


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#4
May 27, 2020 at 07:47:44
The router (number 3) on the complete other side of the house is a Linksys EA8300. I need to get my crossover plugged in and check it's set up routing wise.

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#5
May 27, 2020 at 10:00:19
Here's my guide to adding a second router to your LAN:

https://www.computing.net/howtos/sh...

If it's not the one you used please refer to it and try again to setup your router.

To add your third router, and to create a separate subnet, you'll need to follow that portion of my guide.

Looking at the image with TCP/IP settings it looks like you're configuring the "Internet" (ie: WAN/external) interface. For extending a single subnet you want to use the LAN settings and connect to router 1 with a LAN port. Also, I noticed the 'default gateway' IP configured there is .198 and it should be the LAN IP of router 1.

For router 3, you'll be creating a separate subnet so in that case you'll be connecting it to router 1 using the internet (ie: WAN/external) port and will configure TCP/IP settings on that interface.

So to sum up, if I'm getting this all correct:

Internet >> Router 1 (WAN) port >> LAN Port >> Router 2 >> LAN port (same subnet)
Internet >> Router 1 (WAN) port >> LAN port >> Router 3 >> WAN port (separate subnet)

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
May 27, 2020 at 10:12:10
Basically it seems you have your main router and wish to use two other routers to cover/feed other areas of the house so as to use the main router's internet connection everywhere; and of course be able network all computers across the LAN? Is that correct?

Simplest way to do this is via homeplug adapters; and the additional routers are configured to let the main router assign ip addresses for them. Using homeplug system means the link between each additional router and the main router is an equivalent to cat-5/ethernet; and much more stable/secure than trying to use wifi to the same end.

You connect the main router to an adapter in a mains outlet; then have a similar adapter adjacent or near to each of the other routers and they connect to that accordingly. The connection is cat-5/ethernet; and most makes include a one metre (just over a yard) cable with each adapter.

If you're not famiilar wth homeplug system, have a browse for it on the web, and maybe view Devolo.com website too for a "what its all about" (Alfie). Devolo were one of the first to develop homeplug systems; and are available in UK and Europe - they're a German company; but not available in Canada/USA. However there are other brands there.


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#7
May 27, 2020 at 11:17:09
Curt, thats the problem. I cannot set the Default Gateway AND the Internet IP to the same.

Maybe the 3rd router is on another subnet, thats why I'm not seeing it when I scan the .0.1 net.

Trvlr, I'm in the USA. I have seen similar devices. I will check them out.

Thank you!


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#8
May 27, 2020 at 12:46:08
I'm getting confused.........LOL

Ok first off, you want to extend your existing LAN to two additional routers...........correct?

Which is to say, you're not using one of the routers to create a separate subnet. If this is the case, then all uplinks between routers need to be LAN port to LAN port.

When configuring TCP/IP addresses on routers 2 and 3, you need to configure then on the LAN interface. You don't need a default gateway address as the routers themselves will be able to talk to each other because they're on the same subnet. You only need a default gateway address when you wish to go outside the LAN.

Config:
Router 1:
IP: 192.168.0.1
SM: 255.255.255.0

Router 2:
IP: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0

Router 3:
IP: 192.168.0.3
SM: 255.255.255.0

On router 1, and only on router 1, will you configure DHCP service. The defaults should be fine and will be something like this:
DHCP Scope = 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199
SM: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.0.1

Clients connecting via wired, or wireless will get their TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server on router 1 when you have all 3 routers correctly configured and connected.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
May 28, 2020 at 06:52:02
Sorry I'm confusing you! I really appreciate your help.

So only router one has DHCP? ok. I thought I needed it to have the wifi connect, but I must not need it on router 2 and 3.

I get that it connects to the LAN port and not the WAN on the routers!

I think the only question i have, is the router 2 and 3 Must be set to DHCP? So it automatically get's it's gateway and sub info from router 1? This is where I am making a mistake.

Thank you again!


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#10
May 28, 2020 at 07:25:51
Correct, you only need (want) one DHCP server.

After 20+ years working in IT I'm a huge fan of the KISS principle and employ it wherever/whenever possible. Putting multiple DHCP servers in your small home LAN is a lot of extra work and unnecessary. As long as all 3 routers are on the same subnet, then every client connecting (wired or wireless) to them can "talk" to the DHCP server and get TCP/IP settings from it.

I think the only question i have, is the router 2 and 3 Must be set to DHCP? So it automatically get's it's gateway and sub info from router 1? This is where I am making a mistake.

No, set the LAN TCP/IP settings the way I describe above. You don't need to have a default gateway address on their LAN port. All they need is a valid IP within the same subnet as router 1 and the correct subnet mask and routers 2 and 3 will be able to talk to router 1.

As I said, a default gateway address is only required if you want to go outside the LAN. Router's 2 and 3 will not be accessing the internet themselves so they don't require a DG address on their LAN interface. Clients connecting to them (wired or wireless) will get their TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server and will get the DG from the DHCP server and that will allow them to access the internet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#11
May 28, 2020 at 07:38:22
Ok, so thats the issue. I cannot get away with the default gateway being blank. Well, I couldn't when I was setting it static. I guess since its DHCP from router 1, then I dont need to even worry! This might solve everything!!!

I will work on it later after work and see if I can get it functioning.

I like the kiss idea! I don't want to have all the extra work for no reason!

Thank you again!


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#12
May 28, 2020 at 08:47:01
If the LAN configuration of router's 2 and 3 do not allow a blank default gateway then just put the LAN IP of router 1 in there as your DG............that's the correct DG after all.

You can confirm what IP to use by checked the TCP/IP settings on your PC/laptop and using that default gateway IP.

For devices like your routers, I much prefer a static IP over DHCP. Then I know what the IP's are and I can easily connect to the management interface if I need to.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#13
May 28, 2020 at 10:03:50
For devices like your routers, I much prefer a static IP over DHCP. Then I know what the IP's are and I can easily connect to the management interface if I need to.

Agree fully with CurtR on this... I also assign printers a static/fixed ip; and my NAS likewise.

Ideally I assign everything (Macs = x2; iDevices etc.; satellite/digibox and so on) on my home lan its own fixed ip; makes it all so much more stable.

And I ensure that the router has an upto date list of what device is using which... (reserved ip addresses)


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#14
May 28, 2020 at 11:10:14
I'm the same trvlr The only things that use DHCP in my LAN are clients.....be they phone, TV, pad, laptop or PC.

Printers, servers, network appliances etc all get static IP's. But rather than play with reservations I just use IP's outside the DHCP scope. Ip's between 20 and 99. I'm lazy and rather then create an exclusion or reservation, I use those IP's I know won't ever be given out to clients so as to avoid possible dupes.

2 through 20 I use for routers, firewalls, switches, etc.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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