Strength of Router Firewall

Hewlett-packard / Hp pavilion dv5 notebook...
February 23, 2009 at 01:04:31
Specs: Windows Vista, 1.9 GHz / 2812 MB
I currently connect to the Internet through a cable modem. Between the cable modem and all my computers is a Linksys WRT54g wireless router. I know this server acts as a firewall. Will it be effective at preventing incoming attacks on my computer or is it also necessary to run Windows Firewall? I know running both can't hurt, but I just wanted some opinions as to what level of protection the router's firewall provides.

This is a challenge posting by CNChallenger.


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#1
February 23, 2009 at 03:50:30
It's always a good idea to run a router firewall, that denies the most unwanted traffic or connection attempts.

It's also another good idea to run a firewall on every desktop pc behind this router.
This firewall should include an application firewall so that you will be asked whether a new program should be allowed to start and what kind of network traffic is allowed for that program.

So a download routine, you may get via email will not be started automatically without your knowledge, and it's not automatically allowed to download other viruses or trojans to infect your system.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#2
February 23, 2009 at 07:43:43
I'm pretty comfortable with the protection provided by a SOHO router's firewall. You can easily test yours by going to the Shields UP website and running a thorough scan of ports. It will show you what, if any, open ports you're showing the world.

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#3
February 23, 2009 at 08:28:06
Curt R

So far you're right. But all this did not protect your pc from things you get via E-Mail and tries to download the real virus or trojan, that might make your machine to a member of e.g. a botnet.
In this case, the connection will be established from inside your network and, as most firewall routers do, everything from inside to the internet is allowed.

That is my thought.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#4
February 23, 2009 at 13:23:46
I think a lot of it comes down to how comfortable you are with trusting what you click on. I'm not that worried about email threats, I use gmail, which is pretty good at virus and trojan filtering, and I read my mail in plain text with no html and links disabled. Plus, I don't read mail from people or places I don't know. NoScript for firefox also eliminates a lot of threats. If you're not pretty aware of how your actions can get malware on to your machine, then stick with a desktop "security" package. The new Norton's actually surprisingly lightweight and user friendly.

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