Solved slow speed on my second router LAN TO LAN

March 26, 2014 at 10:09:09
Specs: Windows Vista
I have had had a second router connected to my network for years no problem. It is set up right for that purpose . i have a 50 foot Cat5 cable running to my office in the shop connected LAN to LAN and until lately the speed matched the house speed. I have tried multiple ideas from forums online.the cable is most likely frozen in the ground could that be the problem I have 8mbs in house and les then 1mbs in shop

See More: slow speed on my second router LAN TO LAN

Report •


✔ Best Answer
March 26, 2014 at 12:40:59
Thank you for update.

As earlier - suggest you use better quality cable if possible; and whichever type you use ensure it's enclosed in conduit. Plastic will be fine.

Ensure it's not too near the surface to be overly chilled (frozen) in such weather; but also no need to be ridiculously deep either.

Typical cable types are not spec'd/designed for long term exposure to the elements - sun, rain, snow, frost... Also many little furry creatures seem to like a nibble of some casings/sheathing (squirrels especially). Suspect they enjoy a mild high from the chemicals in it; and per chance a given cable has a few volts on it (typical phone cct. to your home) they get a mild "thrill" too...

Also not wise to have more than three in-line connections in the path - excluding those at the ends (the in/out).

This is one of many excellent resource sites re' cables various:

http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutor...

And I defer to their comments re' cat-5, cat-5e etc.

Cat-5e would allow use of higher network speeds anon if you wished to there...?



#1
March 26, 2014 at 10:27:31
Just to clarify - Is the cable actually buried in the ground; and if so is it enclosed in conduit of any kind, standard (usually) plastc or even (less likely) metal?

Have you checked the actual connections at each end?

Also, if you temporarily bring the second router nearer the first one and connect it that way, what is the speed? I'm thinking bringing the two more or less next to each other for the test?

If speed then returns to the previous 8Meg then it does tend to suggest your buried cable is failing...

Final tests... Use a cat-5 cable test unit to verify integrity of the cable innards. Also perhaps run out a fresh length of cat-5 above ground and see if that gives/restores the previuos speed.

If the buried cable is at a depth (even in conduit) where it might be so cold as to be "frozen" - and I mean somewhat less than the usual 32degrees F, zero C.. it may have suffered. The specs for the cable would confirm its rated temperature range?

If replacing the current cable go for heavier duty/higher specs. cat-5e or cat-6?

This might be of interest in that regard

http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2013/0...

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#2
March 26, 2014 at 11:35:09
ok thanks for the advice i hooked it up just with a short cable at house and its my buried cable that's giving me a problem thanks again

Report •

#3
March 26, 2014 at 12:23:43
What type of cable did you use for the buried cable? Did you just use a standard plenum grade cable, or did you use an outdoor grade cable?

The outdoor grade usually has a much heavier, thicker casing and has grease inside it. Using a plenum grade cable is not a good idea, especially if you're burying the cable right in the ground and not using some sort of conduit.

If you decide to replace the cable, I'd suggest some 3/4" or 1" plastic conduit and outdoor grade cable.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
March 26, 2014 at 12:40:59
✔ Best Answer
Thank you for update.

As earlier - suggest you use better quality cable if possible; and whichever type you use ensure it's enclosed in conduit. Plastic will be fine.

Ensure it's not too near the surface to be overly chilled (frozen) in such weather; but also no need to be ridiculously deep either.

Typical cable types are not spec'd/designed for long term exposure to the elements - sun, rain, snow, frost... Also many little furry creatures seem to like a nibble of some casings/sheathing (squirrels especially). Suspect they enjoy a mild high from the chemicals in it; and per chance a given cable has a few volts on it (typical phone cct. to your home) they get a mild "thrill" too...

Also not wise to have more than three in-line connections in the path - excluding those at the ends (the in/out).

This is one of many excellent resource sites re' cables various:

http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutor...

And I defer to their comments re' cat-5, cat-5e etc.

Cat-5e would allow use of higher network speeds anon if you wished to there...?


Report •


Ask Question