Shareing computer over internet

March 19, 2010 at 08:37:40
Specs: Windows XP, intel dual core 3.0
what is the use of Static IP
can i use this for shareing Files, Printers etc over internet
if yes, pls instruct me how to do it

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#1
March 19, 2010 at 08:57:16
what is the use of Static IP

Typically, static IP's are used for such things as servers, printers and network appliances who's IP's should never change.

can i use this for shareing Files, Printers etc over internet

Yes you can, I do that all the time. I have a somewhat complicated setup at home (comes from being a professional computer geek for a long time) but I won't get into the complex part, I'll give you a more "typical" setup.

Internet >> SOHO Router >> Clients

Now let's say your using the following subnet in your LAN: 192.168.0.0/24
with the following DHCP Scope defined:
192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199

Now, you have a Windows based computer in your LAN that you store files one and wish to be able to access remotely. Because it's going to be providing a "service" you will want a static IP address so you assign it one outside the DHCP Scope. So for this example we'll give your Windows computer: 192.168.0.10

To access it remotely you would first allow Remote Desktop connections. You do this in your System Properties on the "Remote" tab (System Properties can be found in Control Panel).

Then you would create what is called a "Port Forward" on your SOHO Router. RDC (Remote Desktop Connection) uses port 3389 so on your router you would forward port 3389 to the IP of the PC you wish to connect to. Using our example above your forward would look as follows:

Forward Port 3389 to 192.168.0.10

Now, all you need to know to connect remotely is the public IP address of your internet connection. The from wherever, you would use the RDC client to connect to that IP and when you hit the firewall, it will automatically forward your connection to the PC you specified in the port forward.


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#2
March 19, 2010 at 20:46:08
A static IP address is a number (in the form of a dotted quad)
that is assigned to a computer by an Internet service provider
(ISP) to be its permanent address on the Internet. Computers
use IP addresses to locate and talk to each other on the
Internet, much the same way people use phone numbers to
locate and talk to one another on the telephone. When you
want to visit whatis.com, your computer asks a domain name
system (DNS) server (think telephone information operator) for
the correct dotted quad number (think phone number) for
whatis.com and your computer uses the answer it receives to
connect to the whatis.com server.
You can know more about it by this link:
http://searchwindevelopment.techtar...
8_gci520967,00.html
http://www.joyfax.com/?ref=VIVIAN

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#3
March 20, 2010 at 06:14:14
Not to be critical but misinformation annoys me more than anything else and you're going to confuse the OP.

(in the form of a dotted quad)

Never heard of that.......an IP address in the following format: 192.168.0.0 is called "dotted decimal format" because it is the decimal representation of the actual binary number. But I have no idea what "dotted quad" is supposed to mean unless you're referring to the fact that there are 4 octets in an IPv4 address.


A static IP address is a number (in the form of a dotted quad) that is assigned to a computer by an Internet service provider (ISP) to be its permanent address on the Internet

It can be, but a 'static' IP address can be any IP address that is manually assigned as compared to one assigned by DHCP. For instance, in my home network, I use DHCP. But, my managed switch, network printer, my UNIX router/firewall, and this computer I'm on typing this all have static IP's I've assigned manually. All the other computers get theirs from DHCP.



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