setup LINKSYS WRT54GL

Linksys Wireless-g wrt54gl broadband rou...
December 5, 2010 at 22:26:06
Specs: Windows XP
I have setup WRT54GL access point and enable the dhcp server.
The internet IP
IP : 192.168.6.11
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : 192.168.6.1
DNS: X.X.X.X
The Router IP:
IP: 192.168.6.10
Mask :255.255.255.0

dhcp range - from 192.168.6.12-192.168.6.50
now when connected wirelessly i get the ip 192.168.6.12. when i check the ipconfig, i will get 192.168.6.10 as the gateay ip, where supposely the gateway is 192.168.6.1

the problem is, why I cant ping IPs from different DHCP server. I mean 192.168.6.51-192.168.6.100 ? both DHCP have same gateway which is 192.168.6.1. both dhcp has the same DNS.


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#1
December 5, 2010 at 22:30:43
So you have two dhcp servers in the same class c subnet?

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#2
December 5, 2010 at 22:38:06
Can you please give the detail of the whole set up, how does the AP connect to the main network, also the IP config for the main network.

Such as Modem---Wireless Router>>AP>>Wireless Client
+
Wired Client

Such as
Modem:
IP: x.x.x.x
Subnet: x.x.x.x

Wireless Router:
WAN Ipconfig is of modem
LAN: x.x.x.x
Subnet: x.x.x.x
Router IP: x.x.x.x
DCHP IP Range: x.x.x.x - x.x.x.x

Since you already give AP config this above info will beable to give us a better idea of the set up and help with troubleshooting.


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#3
December 6, 2010 at 00:08:14
yes. i have 2 dhcp on the class c subnet. it is possible right?

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#4
December 6, 2010 at 00:20:40
OK. I plug in cat6 cable from nwtwork switch which is already configured to access internet to the AP. then the AP will get the IP from the DHCP server which is (192.168.6.150-192.168.6.200). Then I configured the AP, I gave it fix IP as below,
The internet IP
IP : 192.168.6.11
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : 192.168.6.1
DNS: 202.188.0.133
The Router IP:
IP: 192.168.6.10
Mask :255.255.255.0

dhcp range - from 192.168.6.12-192.168.6.50.

After that i take 1 notebook and i connect to this AP. The notebook will get the AP DHCP ip.

The problem is where this notebook can't communiacte with PCs that get IP directly from the network switch (192.168.6.150-192.168.6.200).


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#5
December 6, 2010 at 05:43:58
Let's have some more info here.

This switch you talk about (ie: "The problem is where this notebook can't communiacte with PCs that get IP directly from the network switch (192.168.6.150-192.168.6.200).")

What is it's make and model? Also, why are you doing DHCP from it?

Why are you trying to run two DHCP servers in the same segment? This makes no sense and only adds complexity to your network. Ideally, you should only be running one DHCP server.

Above you show your config on the router as being:

IP : 192.168.6.11
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : 192.168.6.1

The IP above, is it the LAN or WAN sife of your router?

The Gateway IP........what is 192.168.6.1? What device?

Typically, the WAN (Internet) IP is provided by your ISP. I think you have WAN and LAN side confused.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
December 6, 2010 at 18:08:32
Hi All,
thx for the feedback.

The switch that i talked about is Cisco 2960. The AP is connected to this switch. the AP will get DHCP IP from this switch, but I assign fix IP as below.

Internet setting
IP : 192.168.6.11
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Gateway : 192.168.6.1
DNS: 192.168.1.133

LAN settings
IP: 192.168.6.10
MASK: 255.255.255.0

The gateway is our Cisco PIX 515e. All PCs connected to the cisco switch will get this gateway IP.

I enabled the DHCP function at the AP and connect 1 notebook (wireless) to this AP. The notebook will get IP from this AP.

So that i want this notebook can communicate with any PCs connected wired to the Cisco switch 2960.

I enabled DHCP at the AP because i want pcs that use wireless can bypass proxy. PCs that connected directly to the cisco switch will need to use the proxy.


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#7
December 7, 2010 at 05:58:00
I enabled DHCP at the AP because i want pcs that use wireless can bypass proxy. PCs that connected directly to the cisco switch will need to use the proxy.

Why do you want the wireless clients to bypass the proxy? What is the proxy and where is it located (ie: internal to your LAN, external)?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
December 7, 2010 at 16:04:31
Mornig Curt R,

The proxy is an appliance to access to internet. The proxy is located in our internal LAN. I want wireless users like ( customers/visitors ) to bypass proxy.


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#9
December 8, 2010 at 12:33:24
You didn't really answer my question. At least not clearly. From the following statement, "I want wireless users like ( customers/visitors ) to bypass proxy." I'm going to guess you mean you want a "guest" wireless network that doesn't connect to your internal resources.

If I'm right, then I believe you're going about it wrong.

You should have your guest wireless setup on it's own VLAN and ensure it has no access to your internal VLAN's (resources). Then you could use your SOHO Router as the DHCP server, use a completely separate subnet from all internal VLAN's (subnets) for added separation and security, This would of course mean you'd need a router to connect your SOHO (wireless) router to as well as your 2960. I'm not familiar with the 2960's (although I've worked on many 2950's) but if it's a layer 3 switch, then you could use it to do the routing between VLAN's and the internet.

If I'm wrong, please do explain in detail what it is you're trying to accomplish so that I at least have a chance of helping you.

Just FYI, we setup a WLAN here where I work. It's a "guest" type WLAN that allows no internal access. We set ours up as I described above using VLAN tagging and it works great and is completely separate from our internal resources.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
December 8, 2010 at 16:59:02
hi Curt R,

Actually we still want the wireless users to have access to internal network .Internal network that i'm talking about is already in seperate vlan which is vlan for accessing internet only.

Just they dont need to going through the proxy server. (Proxy server is a server where restricted certain sites to users and captured browsing history ).

I already configured the AP and the wireless users can get the IP from the AP and access the internet. The problem is, I can't ping any address which getting the IP from the 2960. Why? The switch dhcp 192.168.6.150-200 and the AP dhcp 192.168.12-50 is still in the same subnet.


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#11
December 10, 2010 at 07:41:58
You plan on intentionally giving visitors/guests access to your internal resources. No wait, if it's an unsecured open WLAN, you've giving free reign to anybody who happens to stop within range access to your internal network and all it's data.

Have you really thought this through?

An open, unsecured WLAN that has access to internal resources.......are you out of your mind!?!?!?!?!?

You do realize that it's only a matter of time before someone either walks right in your WLAN's front door and goes through all your private information like payroll and finance. If you have auto deposits into your bank accounts you've just given whomever all that banking information for all staff. Not to mention credit card information on all customers.

Dude, I could sit outside your building with a laptop, steal all that info and any other data I think worth taking and then I could hack your network up so bad you'd be days getting it back up and running. And, it wouldn't take me more than 15 minutes to do it..........and I'm not a hacker! Someone experience could do all that to you in about 2 minutes.


Do you want to know why you can't make this work? It's because you don't know what you're doing. The fact that you want a "guest" WLAN that has internal access proves my point.

You do what you want mister, but I'm not going to help you make what I consider to be a HUGE mistake.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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