Solved Setting up extender in Senior Apt complex with central wi-fi

Toshiba Satellite c655-s5082 laptop
June 26, 2014 at 13:08:33
Specs: Windows 7
I am about to help a friend hook up to the central Wi-Fi network in his senior residence apartment building where the signal is weak in his unit. If we use a Netgear N300 extender, do I set it up somewhere with a strong signal, then unplug it and take it to his apartment? What is different from setting it up as part of a network in one's house?

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✔ Best Answer
June 26, 2014 at 17:02:46
Generally (these days) wifi extenders will boost an incoming signal to an accetable level. To be "sure" of this aspect I did a quick trawl on the web; and a couple of hits (there were many and I didn't check them all) dealing with these devices, were very clear in that regard; they will boost an incoming signa.

But if the incoming signal is poor - unstable - then logically the actual connection won't be impoved much, if at all, for the area served by the extender.

Also, ideally, the extender is better fed with the incoming signal via cat-5/6; improved stability and a wee bit faster too, than if fed via wifi?



#1
June 26, 2014 at 14:38:50
Do it on-site... You will need to enter details pertinent to the wifi service there.

As long as you can get a signal - you ought to be able to do it?


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#2
June 26, 2014 at 14:53:03
There is a basic flaw in your understanding of repeaters Asker24.

It can not repeat a bad signal. So there is no point in putting a repeater in the apartment.

The repeater needs to live where it gets a good signal and can then send a good signal to the residence apartment which usually means it needs to be placed half way between the two points.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's

message edited by wanderer


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#3
June 26, 2014 at 15:10:12
That has not been my experience in my home, when using an extender as an access point in the remote area with a weak signal. Corrects the problem 100%!

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#4
June 26, 2014 at 17:02:46
✔ Best Answer
Generally (these days) wifi extenders will boost an incoming signal to an accetable level. To be "sure" of this aspect I did a quick trawl on the web; and a couple of hits (there were many and I didn't check them all) dealing with these devices, were very clear in that regard; they will boost an incoming signa.

But if the incoming signal is poor - unstable - then logically the actual connection won't be impoved much, if at all, for the area served by the extender.

Also, ideally, the extender is better fed with the incoming signal via cat-5/6; improved stability and a wee bit faster too, than if fed via wifi?


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#5
June 26, 2014 at 23:04:11
I work with commercial and SOHO extenders both for work [enterprise in two states] and play.

Just like one experience, there are exceptions to the rule. Good luck with what you desire.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's

message edited by wanderer


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#6
June 28, 2014 at 15:00:49
Thank you all for your input. All helpful!

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