server 2008/router

Microsoft Windows server 2008 standard
August 31, 2009 at 16:52:26
Specs: Windows 64
have a 2008 server, wireless n routers and the router with the isp. What is the best way to hook them up?
I wanted to have dhcp on the server enabled. I am new to wireless install. Can I use the wireless routers ports as switch ports? Also do I need to configure the isp's router to do anything? I know I need to dis able the dhcp on the wireless n router but do I need to set up anything else on it so my network of 6 can recieve ip's?

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#1
August 31, 2009 at 18:40:09
If your server should run as DHCP server, non of the routers should run DHCP to avoid trouble.

The routers can be connected simply by using an ordinary network cable from LAN port to LAN port.

You can use the wireless ports as switch ports, because the wireless router has a switch just like a non wireless router.

As mentioned above, on the ISPs router, you also have to disable DHCP.

If you'd like to use the WAN port of the wireless router to connect to the ISPs router, you have to configure the WAN port for static IP. The IP has to be in the same range as the ISPs local IP address.
In case of using the WAN port to connect to a LAN port of ISPs router, the wireless router will secure the internal network with it's firewall.
The routers firewall secures the traffic from the WAN port to the LAN ports but not from LAN port to LAN port.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#2
August 31, 2009 at 18:59:57
I will have to give it a whirl as soon as I go into the clients office. Thanks. Its just a different scenerio considering you they have a wireless router instead of a switch with a wireless router connected to it. Normally you have your ISP router for the gateway and not the isp's router to another wifi router,lol some people. This is the 3rd client I have ran into were they have it all micky rigged up, just wasnt sure if i had to set up any port forwarding or "Ip route" commands to get the traffic to flow right on the internal network side of things.

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#3
August 31, 2009 at 19:44:32
Also curious on the DHCP server if I have to exclude both routers IP's. Curious also which one is going to act as the gateway...

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Related Solutions

#4
August 31, 2009 at 19:49:41
I was talking of a Wireless router with an integrated switch, that can be connected to the ISPs router, which might also have a switch integrated.
Most of those routers do have a 4-port switch integrated, some others do have 8-port switch.

My suggestion was:

PC(LAN-Port/WLAN) ---> (LAN-Port/WLAN)WLAN-Router(WAN-Port) ---> (LAN-Port)ISPs-Router(WAN-Port) ---> Internet

Hope that makes things clear to you.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#5
August 31, 2009 at 20:01:06
Also curious on the DHCP server if I have to exclude both routers IP's. Curious also which one is going to act as the gateway...

Yes just curious on the 2 questions above. Thanks so far great help. I figured todays home/small business wireless routers had intergrated switch ports just wasnt sure.


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#6
August 31, 2009 at 20:53:02
If you use WAN port of wireless router to connect to the ISPs router, the WLAN routers ip address is the gateway address for the clients.
In the WLAN router, you have to configure static ip address as mentioned above. The gateway address and the DNS servers address for the WAN port of the wireless router it the local ip address of the ISPs router. The ISPs router is configured to get it's public ip address via DHCP (automatically) from the ISP, except the company has got a static ip from the ISP.

So to make things clear:
The client PC asks for a website and tries to find it locally. If not found, and that's mostly the case, forwards the request to it's default gateway (the wireless router). The wireless router does the same, and if it couldn't find the website, it forwareds the request to it's default gateway (the ISPs router). The ISPs router, does the same thing. It tries to find the site locally, otherwise it forwards the request to the ISP.

That's how all such things are working.
Ok every rule has it's exception, but that doesn't matter in this case.

Please send a reply, if you solved the problem !!!


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#7
August 31, 2009 at 21:39:35
Much appreciated!

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