sent & received bytes increasing when idle

January 20, 2011 at 08:13:26
Specs: Windows 7, 4 GB C2D e4600 2.4ghz
This has been happening of late. When i check the status of my Internet Connection I notice that the sent and received bytes keeps increasing. I'm sure there are no downloads taking place that I'm aware of. No torrent clients, no antivirus nothing. I checked my PC for malware but that didn't help.
As a result of this, i keep getting high pings in online games and can't even watch videos in youtube anymore.

any solutions? like, some software to monitor all the programs that use the itnernet connection without my knowledge or something??

My primary concern is gaming (Call of Duty 4) so I wouldn't mind this idle downloading (whatever it is) as long as the major chunk of my internet connection is directed towards Cod4!


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#1
January 20, 2011 at 09:23:31
Use NETSTAT -B, to see what apps on your computer are opening ports to the internet.

Remember if you are in Windows Vista or better you have to run your Command Prompt as Administrator.


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#2
January 20, 2011 at 12:40:26
Even when sitting idle your network interface will send out regular "hello is there anybody out there" packets to ensure there's still a working network available. The packets elicit a response which will account for an increase in both incoming and outgoing bytes.

Unless it's a very large increase then it's not likely anything other than what I'm talking about.

If it is a large amount then you'll also want to have a look at you running processes. To do so, hit ctrl - alt - del and click on the Task Manager button. In TM, click on the "Processes" tab. On a computer that's sitting idle, the "System Idle Process" should be running around 95 to 99%. If yours is showing 99% steady, then there's not likely anything nefarious running in the background. If however, you do have some unexplained processes steadily using up CPU time then you'll want to get googling the name of the .exe files associated with them to see if any of them are bad news.

You can also check on TM in the "Networking" tab to see if there's any unusual traffic crossing your interface.

If you're really concerned, download a packet sniffer like Wireshark and you can use it to capture data on the NIC and have a look at the actual contents of the packets going through it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
January 20, 2011 at 23:29:06
About 500 bytes are being sent every second and the received bytes vary from 1000 to 5000 per second. Is this normal?

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Related Solutions

#4
January 21, 2011 at 07:46:36
I don't know if that's "normal" since I've never checked out how much data the network test packets send/receive. But that's not very much in terms of Mb's so it seems ok.

Check in Task Manager too. If your "System Idle" process is sitting around 95% to 99% and you're transferring that much data then I'd say that's all it is.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
January 21, 2011 at 08:52:04
If you would post your NETSTAT -B we can see if you have a Zombie Bot on your computer or something that is using your bandwidth. You could just do this...

NETSTAT -B > C:\NETSTATLOG.TXT

Then open the netstatlog.txt on your C:\ in notepad, copy the contents and paste it. Thanks. You could also go through the LOG and use the WhoIS web site to determine who each of the internet connections are connecting to.

http://whois.domaintools.com/

If you see a connection with someone you don't know then look at the service or program that was opening the connection, in the NETSTAT log. Google the app or service to see what uses it. If it is an app that is a high risk or one you did not install on your system then Google for how to uninstall it.

I also like the Wireshark Idea posted above because you can see what connection is doing the most packets. Then with the NETSTAT log, identify what service or app is doing that connection and remove it.

This kinda advanced stuff so be careful not to remove the wrong app or service or you might break your computer. If you are not comfortable with doing this, then take it to some one who is. As with any thing at this level, I would do a System State backup before you begin.


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