routing through server

Microsoft Windows server 2008 r2 standar...
December 13, 2010 at 05:09:47
Specs: Windows server 2003
i have two routers in my company, one dedicated to data and the other dedicated the internet browsing, for some employees i have to give the data access and for some internet access, the task at hand is that how can i make a client use both the routers without me changing the ip adderss and gateway everytime he need to switch the service,i am new to it so pls help

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#1
December 13, 2010 at 07:34:11
Group policy & other permissions are used for access, not separate routers.

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#2
December 13, 2010 at 07:35:06
I suppose you could try giving the particular client dual NIC's one configured for, and plugged into, each subnet. Then they would need to enable the one they want to use and disable the other.

I have 3 NIC's in my one PC here in my office. One connects to the subnet I'm on normally, the second I use for configuring switches and routers and such and the third connects to our management subnet.

When I'm doing normal day-to-day stuff I leave NIC 1 enabled and 2 and 3 are disabled (in My Network Places). When I need to configure a switch, I disable 1 and enable 2. IfI need to go on the mangaement subnet, I disable 1 or 2 (whichever I'm using at the time) and enable 3...etc etc

As far as I know, there's no automatic way to do this so nobody has to change anything. You can't for instance have both NIC's configured for separate subnets and have both enabled and have traffic go where you want it to as there's no way to (internally, within the computer) tell the traffic to use a specific interface.

It only takes about 5 seconds to right click on My Network Places, choose "Properties" then right click on the NIC you're using and select "disable" then right click on the one you wish to use and click on "enable" and the user could be shown how to do this in about 1 minute.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
December 13, 2010 at 08:47:11
Good luck teaching users how to do that. I've had users tell me, "Oh no, that's an extra click, why should I have to do that, it's supposed to work by itself.

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#4
December 13, 2010 at 09:25:00
It would have been a smarter move to either have put in a dual wan port router or dropped one of the internet accesses and doubled/tripled the bandwidth of the link.

The present config is only going to generate more costs and management overhead impacting productivity. Its a bad move.

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#5
December 14, 2010 at 01:52:48
what about routing and remote access server, will it be able to solve my problem, if not then do i have to add another router to connect to the two routers???

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#6
December 14, 2010 at 06:39:13
You're going off the deep end if you add a third router.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#7
December 14, 2010 at 08:15:24
You would connect both routers via a switch that all of the company devices connect to. You would configure both router lans to be in the same subnet. The problem still comes down to having to manually switch the gateway entry. I can't see a single solution for that which is why I suggested a single gateway.

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#8
December 15, 2010 at 23:08:47
with a single gateway can i restrict some clients with browsing previlages,or can i connect the two routers with a roll over connection

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