Real Basic Cable Question

October 5, 2009 at 07:01:05
Specs: Windos 7, Intel i7 950
I have a quick question.

I know in cat 5 cables, only 4 of the 8 are used for actually sending and receiving data. What are the other 4 used for?

Also, are all 8 cables used in cat 6 cable, or still only the 4 cables, but they are just able to operate at 250 MHz.

Thanks


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#1
October 5, 2009 at 07:14:18

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#2
October 5, 2009 at 07:35:15
I have searched, and didn't find anything. I actually already read a couple articles on that website before I posted.

And the link you gave does not answer my question.


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#3
October 5, 2009 at 08:11:43
I know in cat 5 cables, only 4 of the 8 are used for actually sending and receiving data. What are the other 4 used for?.

The other 4 are not used.

Also, are all 8 cables used in cat 6 cable, or still only the 4 cables, but they are just able to operate at 250 MHz.

It depends on whether you're going to be running at 10/100 or 1000 Mbps.

You misunderstand. The number of wires used has nothing to do with which category of wire you're using. It has to do with the bandwidth that will be carried on it.

1000 Mbps uses all 8 wires. 10/100 uses only 4.


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Related Solutions

#4
October 5, 2009 at 08:14:52
"Category 5 cable (CAT5) is a data transmission cable for computer networks running at 10 or 100 Mbps. It has 8 wires, twisted together to form 4 pairs"

http://www.cat5ecables.co.uk

&

http://www.cat6cables.co.uk


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#5
October 28, 2009 at 03:31:14
CAT5e cables are manufactured with 4 pairs, however in data
transmission environments only 2 pairs are used (4
conductors). For computer networking purposes, the other
pairs are not used at all, but they can be used in other
environments (such as security cameras) for PoE (Power over
Ethernet), or telephone applications.

However, if the CAT5e cable is being used for Gigabit
ethernet, then all 4 pairs are used.

CAT6 cable runs at a higher bandwidth as it has a different
twist rate along the conductors. All 4 pairs are used for data
transmission which is why when you connect devices
together you should use crossover leads, in CAT5e cables
only 2 pairs are crossed over, but a true CAT6 crossover
cable will have all 4 pairs crossed.

Linzi Hughes
Technical Sales Manager
KSM Limited, http://www.madaboutcable.com


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#6
October 28, 2009 at 07:50:04
CAT6 cable runs at a higher bandwidth as it has a different twist rate along the conductors.

Not correct.

Cat5e is also capable of running at 1000 Mbps, just like Cat6. The difference between the two is the frequency they operate at:

5e = 100 Mhz
6 = 250 Mhz

The term "bandwidth" is a measure of the amount of data that can pass through any one point in a network in one second.

All 4 pairs are used for data transmission

Again, not correct.

If you're running at 1000 Mbps and using Cat5e cable, then all 4 pairs in the cable will be used. Conversely, if you're using Cat6 cable and running at 10/100 Mbps, only 2 pairs will be in use.


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#7
November 3, 2009 at 10:24:35
"Cat5e is also capable of running at 1000 Mbps, just like
Cat6. The difference between the two is the frequency they
operate at:5e = 100 Mhz, 6 = 250 Mhz"

Which is exactly why I stated: "However, if the CAT5e cable
is being used for Gigabit ethernet, then all 4 pairs are used."

"All 4 pairs are used for data transmission"
is correct when using CAT6 cable at 1000Mbps, I have used
the assumption that a person would not use CAT6 at 10/100,
as it is an added expense for no need, and again see as
above.

"CAT6 cable runs at a higher bandwidth as it has a different
twist rate along the conductors."

Correction there - I had meant to say frequency and not
bandwidth. Sometimes no matter even when you read over
these things they still escape you. However, I was more so
trying to make the point that the construction of CAT5e and
CAT6 are exactly the same, and manufacturers produce the
conductors for the two together and the only difference
between the two is the final lay-up at the manufacturing
process when they make the twist rate on CAT6 higher than
they do for CAT5e to help eliminate cross talk at higher
frequencies.

I believe you are being a little picky, however perhaps my
explanation was not so clear and it is good to clear it up, so
thank you for pointing those out.

Linzi Hughes
Technical Sales Manager
KSM Limited, http://www.madaboutcable.com


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