Question about port forwarding on wireless modem

May 16, 2014 at 18:55:14
Specs: Win 7
I just got a Clear Hub Express 4G wireless modem / router.
It has a built-in firewall, and allows port forwarding, which I
don't understand very well but am trying to use in order to
more thoroughly stealth the ports to the Internet.

In the port forwarding setup, I can specify which device to
forward to, and which port or range of ports to forward, but
there does not appear to be any way to specify which port
or range of ports to forward them *to*. That seems like
something I should be able to do.

Here is a link to the Clear support page for the modem.
There is a link on the page to a PDF specifically about port
forwarding. It carefully goes through each step, but never
hints at the possibility of forwarding to a different port number.
The video linked beside the PDF has exactly the same info.

http://www.clear.com/support/downlo...

Is forwarding to a different port possible, and if so, how?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
May 17, 2014 at 00:54:33
The port number you are associating with the device using is the number you are forwarding to to. The port you are forwarding from is determined by the originator of whatever you are trying to forward.. They are both usually the same but can be different depending on the configuration of the server that you are port forwarding to.

Port forwarding is not used for stealth purposes. In fact port forwarding will drive a hole through any stealth facilities you may have set up. The purpose of port forwarding is to allow the router to handle unsolicited packets. Normally a routers firewall will reject any unsolicited packets and only allow solicited packets through such as HTTP requests. This is needed if you are running any kind of server that needs to respond to requests from outside your LAN.

If you want to stealth your LAN you configure the firewall to ignore any UDP requests. UDP packets are used by the Ping commands if your router is ignoring ping commands it is effectively stealthed. You cannot stealth your system and have port forwarding in operation at the same time. If you have port forwarding in operation there will always be at least one port open and able to respond to outside requests. That is its purpose.

Stuart

message edited by StuartS


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#2
May 17, 2014 at 12:10:48
Stuart,

I'm trying to use port forwarding for something other than its
intended purpose. I'm doing it because it looks like the only
way I *might* be able to stealth one open port and two closed
ports on the modem. Chances are that I can't do anything
about those three ports, but I want to try. Maybe I can stealth
one or two of them even if I can't stealth all three.

Up to now I've had only a dial-up connection to the Internet.
At that time I used the Windows Firewall advanced settings
and made it as tight as I could get it. Only nine inbound entries
are set to allow (the rest are blocked by default, with those rules
disabled), and only three outbound entries are set to allow (with
all the rest set to block).

When I go to http://www.grc.com/default.htm Gibson Research
Corporation and navigate to the Shields UP! Internet Connection
Security Analysis test of All Service Ports, all 1056 tested ports
are shown as "stealthed" -- perfect!

I don't understand how setting most but not all of the entries in
Windows Firewall to "block" results in ALL of the first 1056 ports
being stealthed. I must have done something right, but I don't
know what.

The new wireless modem has very limited info on its firewall.
Everything I have can be found via the link in my first post.

Since there does not appear to be any way for me to stealth
the three ports with the firewall, I'm trying to forward the three
ports on the modem to other, unused ports on the modem, so
that any requests sent to those ports are sent into oblivion.

That was suggested by info on these pages:

https://www.grc.com/port_53.htm
https://www.grc.com/port_113.htm

Port 53 is the open port and port 113 is one of the two closed
ports.

I don't understand the first two sentences of your reply:

> The port number you are associating with the device
> [you are] using is the number you are forwarding to.
> The port you are forwarding from is determined by the
> originator of whatever you are trying to forward..

The modem's port forwarding setup lets me type in a range
of "WAN Port" numbers to forward. It does not let me specify
which ports on the client device they should be forwarded to.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
May 21, 2014 at 23:59:56
Anybumpy?

Either how to forward to a different port or how to stealth any
of the three unstealthed ports on the Clear Hub Express.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#4
May 22, 2014 at 01:17:53
If it is stealth you are after forget about port forwarding. It is a completely wrong approach. It will do the opposite of what you are trying to do.

To stealth ports you need to configure your Modem/Router to reject UDP packets. That is usually done in the firewall. If the firewall doesn't allow it then you are stumped.

You said in your previous post the Gibson Research report the first 1054 ports, so what is the problem.

Stuart


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#5
May 22, 2014 at 04:00:14
With my dial-up connection, the Gibson Research test reports
all of the first 1056 ports as stealthed. With my new Clear Hub
Express 4G connection, one of those ports is reported as open
and two are reported as closed. The Gibson page I linked to
for port 53 says:

> If our port analysis reveals that your system's port 53 is open
> and listening for incoming traffic, you should determine what's
> going on.

The Gibson page for port 113 explains how to use forwarding
to stealth that port if the router doesn't stealth it. That is what I
wanted to do for that port, and maybe also for port 53 and the
other closed port. But the router doesn't appear to have a way
to forward to a different port number, on either the same device
or a different device.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#6
May 22, 2014 at 10:20:15
Jeff you are being way too paranoid about this. Ports are only an issue if you are not keeping up with OS patches or raw on the internet and that vulnerability is via port access. One open and two closed is tight.

But if you still wish to pursue this all you need to do is forward the port to a invalid ip address or the loopback ip 127.0.0.1

You have far greater risk with not keeping AV updated or not having a firewall as well as where you go on the internet.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's

message edited by wanderer


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#7
May 22, 2014 at 13:58:53
Gibson seems to know what he's writing about, so I was
following his advice. Since I can get "perfect" stealth with
Windows Firewall on my old connection, I'm wanting to do
the same with my new modem / router.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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