Problem with my networking. WRT150N and WAP54

July 23, 2010 at 11:27:44
Specs: Windows 7, 4gig
EDIT: I forgot to mention my access point firmware is 3.04 (latest version) on the WAP54G

EDIT: Oh and the WAP54G is setup as a basic access point hardwired to the router

I've posted this problem on 2 other networking forums with no replies or fixes....hoping someone here can help me!

Hello. New to the forums here and thought someone could possibly help me.

I network a small business hotel for a buddy and I set up a WRT150N router connected to a WAP54G access point. The problem is none of the settings for the router cross over to the access point. For instance:

The router has it's own ssid of 'hotel' and the access point also has its on ssid as 'guest' because the access point is what the guest will pick up. Well in the router config. page at 192.168.1.1 I tried to block certain web pages for instance lets just say http://www.google.com and then save settings. Well on the main computer the router is hooked up to google.com will be blocked. But for anyone logging in wireless to the access point (which is connected to the router with the settings) will be able to access google.com

This also happens if I do mac filtering to allow or deny access. However on the access config page at 192.168.1.245 there is options that will allow me to do mac filtering, but anything else i would like to configure is not available on the WAP54G like QOS to disable certain applications or priority level by mac address so I can add my laptop and in and set it to high, and also doesn't have options for page blocking or setting specific times for internet access only.

I thought hooking the access point straight up to the router would in theory take the settings from the router to the AP but it doesn't. I can block a device from accessing our network by mac address on the router but it will still be able to connect on the access point, seems weird like that should make no sense at all...so i think im doing something wrong..

Anyone know how I can get my access point to recognize the settings i put on my router like web page blocking, mac filtering, internet use by time of day, QOS ect...any help would be GREATLY appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to read this and I look forward to being apart of this community.


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#1
July 23, 2010 at 12:53:43
Ok, taking it one step at a time:

The router has it's own ssid of 'hotel' and the access point also has its on ssid as 'guest' because the access point is what the guest will pick up. Well in the router config. page at 192.168.1.1 I tried to block certain web pages for instance lets just say http://www.google.com and then save settings. Well on the main computer the router is hooked up to google.com will be blocked. But for anyone logging in wireless to the access point (which is connected to the router with the settings) will be able to access google.com

According to what I see here, you have setup two separate wireless networks. One on the router (hotel) and the other on the AP (guest). You then edit the "hotel" WLAN and set it so you can't reach google.

Considering you have to separate WLAN's it's not surprise is it, that a change made on "hotel" doesn't affect a user on "guest". This is expected since the two ("hotel" and "guest") are completely different (and separate) WLAN's (wireless local area networks)

In order for the restriction to affect someone connecting wirelessly to the AP, the AP would have to be a part of "hotel".

I thought hooking the access point straight up to the router would in theory take the settings from the router to the AP but it doesn't.

It will, if you make sure the AP is part of the WLAN configured on the router. As I said above, the way you have set things up (ie: separate WLAN on the AP) it can't get those settings.

Anyone know how I can get my access point to recognize the settings i put on my router like web page blocking, mac filtering, internet use by time of day, QOS ect..

I suspect after reading my previous input you already have figured out the answer. To be perfectly clear, for changes made on the WLAN configured on the router to be accessible to the AP and anyone connected to it, the AP has to be connected to (a part of, a member of) the WLAN configured on the router.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
July 23, 2010 at 13:51:53
Thank you so much for replying to my post. You the first who has any answer for me and I appreciate it very much. I'm still confused a bit on what I need to do...How do I go about making sure the AP is part of the WLAN configured on the router?

Right now I have cable modem connected to internet spot on router, then port 1 is connected to the access point, port 2 is connected to the main computer in office and port 3 is connected to our vonage phone. Is there something I need to switch around there or something I configure in the router settings to make the AP is part of the WLAN? If so how? Just a bit confused but im sure with your help I can figure this out, thanks so much!


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#3
July 23, 2010 at 14:51:00
How you have your equipment plugged in should be just fine.

The exact setup procedure on the AP will be detailed in the setup guide/manual that came with it. I recommend reading it through.

Here's what I consider a typical (or "default") type setup. I will not be worrying about using encryption or an encryption key. I recommend doing so, but as you mention a hotel, I'm guessing you want to setup wireless "guest" access for clients (ie: internet access only, no access to internal network).

Going on that basis:

Router:

Wireless Enabled = yes
SSID = hotel
LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
SM: 255.255.255.0
DHCP = enabled
DHCP Scope = 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199

NOTE: your DHCP server should provide the LAN IP of the router (192.168.0.1) as the DNS and the Default Gateway IP for DHCP clients

You would give the AP a static IP in the same subnet (but outside of the DHCP Scope) as the router.

AP:
LAN IP: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0
DG: 192.168.0.1 (if required)

Once it's connected and up and running, a computer on the LAN should be able to ping the AP's IP address. If it responds, it should be working and all clients should have to do is connect to the "hotel" WLAN (wireless local area network) and DHCP will give them a valid IP and they will have internet access as well as access to other LAN clients.

Again, read the manual for the AP

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#4
July 23, 2010 at 17:21:32
Than you so much. Your being a great help. Unfortunately I'm not at the location yet to test it out but will be there In about an hour. But from what your saying it seeks like I would only be configuring the router. And just leave the access point alone at 192.168.1.245. Is this right?

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#5
July 23, 2010 at 18:51:43
I'm sorry. I read your previous post wrong (was trying to read it on my phone) And I see how you mean now i think. So for the router the ip address is 192.168.1.1 but I should change it to 192.168.0.1 ? then change the ap from 192.168.1.245 to 192.168.0.2 ?

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#6
July 23, 2010 at 19:17:33
i tried to change the router from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.0.1 but i couldnt connect to the router anymore after that and had to reset the router back to default. Im just not sure what steps to do so that the AP uses the same settings as the router..

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#7
July 24, 2010 at 06:02:52
Argh!!!!

I didn't tell you to change your IP addresses. I was giving you an example of how to set it up. All you had to do was extrapolate from my example......not change all your settings.

I'm begining to think English isn't your first language. I'm quite sure my responses in here have all been pretty clear and concise yet you don't seem to be grasping what I'm saying.

I'm not going to repeat myself for a third time. Reread my last post and keep doing so until it makes sense. If you can't make sense of it, get somebody (a friend, a family member, hire a professional) who has a good grasp of computing and some basic networking knowledge, give them the router and AP manuals, explain what you want to do, and then have them read my posts in here.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
July 24, 2010 at 09:55:47
I'm sorry. I don't know that much about networking and don't know anyone who even has more knowledge then myself. I need someone to break things down to me more specifically. Like how to change lan ip to 192.168.0.1 and how to change dhcp scope, it wouldnt even let me change those settings in my router. I'll try and seek help some place else I suppose maybe i can find a guide with pictures and each step what to do. I appreciate your time. Thank you.

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