Solved Private browsing on public AND workplace networks

Toshiba / Satellite a100
July 30, 2016 at 23:45:35
Specs: Windows XP, x86 1995 MHz
I am concerned about privacy in public places and work place. I know my employer -for example- can see exactly what websites I visit on the network computer but how about the following situations:

1)If I use TOR browser. Does that make my browsing private?
2)If I use a wifi USB adapter as a hotspot for my tablet. I will be taking the net connection from the network computer but do the browsing on the tablet.
3)If I use a VPN?

Which one of those ways makes my browsing private?


See More: Private browsing on public AND workplace networks

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✔ Best Answer
July 31, 2016 at 06:18:24
Since you're concerned about security, the US Dept of Defense has a small Linux distro called Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) that can be run from either a Live CD or bootable USB thumbdrive. The latest version is 1.6.4.

"LPS (Lightweight Portable Security) is an open source distribution of Linux that provides users with a thin client designed to run directly from a portable device and to not expose your private data and credentials to anyone."

http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Syst...



#1
July 31, 2016 at 00:35:06
You should talk to your employer about this. They may well have rules about your Internet usage and breaching them may put your employment in question.

message edited by ijack


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#2
July 31, 2016 at 01:00:11
Is this a company supplied computer?
What is your concern regarding privacy? do you have something to hide?

VPN is encrypted up to the VPN server you are connected with.

message edited by sluc


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#3
July 31, 2016 at 01:03:26
I asked about all public networks not just work, and I asked for a technical advice not for a moral lecture. If you dont know that info pls keep your morals to yourself!!

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Related Solutions

#4
July 31, 2016 at 01:49:56
ayay Captain!

Public places without encryption is a haven for snoopers and hackers. Any personal information sent as clear text can be captured easily or even logged even your complete browsing activity . Any establishment offering FREE internet can play in to this unsafe environment.

Depending on your country's (or regional) internet regulations, your ISP also logs certain data of your internet activity for an extended period of time!

message edited by sluc


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#5
July 31, 2016 at 03:21:57
You gave your employer as a specific example!

No lecture on morals intended (although I seem to have hit a sore spot!) merely pragmatic information. It would be a shame if your employment was terminated for a breach of your employer's data usage policy.

Be assured that if you use a non-secure network any technically competent user can know exactly what sites you access and what you are doing. You don't even know whether you are connecting to the site you intend or whether you are the victim of a man-in-the-middle or DNS-poisoning exploit.


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#6
July 31, 2016 at 04:52:29
If you dont know that info pls keep your morals to yourself!!

Obviously you haven't got any and are looking for help to circumvent policies in your work place. I hope you try because you will get caught.

There are no methods you can use which will keep your actions in the work place "private" and even if there were, those would also be against company policy and get you fired for attempting to use them as well.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
July 31, 2016 at 06:18:24
✔ Best Answer
Since you're concerned about security, the US Dept of Defense has a small Linux distro called Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) that can be run from either a Live CD or bootable USB thumbdrive. The latest version is 1.6.4.

"LPS (Lightweight Portable Security) is an open source distribution of Linux that provides users with a thin client designed to run directly from a portable device and to not expose your private data and credentials to anyone."

http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Syst...


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#8
July 31, 2016 at 06:52:36
Damn it... the sekret is out...

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#9
July 31, 2016 at 07:43:29
sluc: I like your navy background! Yes I know that the ISP can know which sites I visit. Living in a politically turmoiled area, I should be careful which sites to visit. For example, visiting the site of Amnesty international could be considered offensive to some here.

iijack: It would be a shame if your employment was terminated Thanks for the concern but I didnt ask for such advice.

Curt R: Obviously you haven't got any and are looking for help to circumvent policies in your work place. No I am waiting for you to teach me some since you seem to be full of...those morals. I dont know what makes you so competent to draw that judgment behind the purpose of my question. Jumping to such judgment makes you incompetent to be a moderator on this forum....

riider: best answer by far. right to the point and technical. Others can learn from this.

trvlr: Dont worry I will share this info with just a few thousands who fear retribution due to their believes.

message edited by Gentleman


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#10
July 31, 2016 at 08:41:26
There once was a wee small usb-stick routine with a basic OS (forget which version of whatever it was; I think it was a variant of '9x) which allegedly allowed one to login and use any given PC; not save/write anything to the drive - nor leave foot prints... Essentially login and go; and anything that wasn't protected... was there to be viewed... And one could browse the web too. I seem to recall it predated the Linux versions...

Incidentally I don't think any moralising was intended in the assorted responses here; more a general observation on the state of play re' company kit. There are some out there who might be less inclined to consider such issues - and just about every forum of any worth would more than likely have included similar comments re' the situation...; if only to cover themselves - and perhaps warn the unwary/innocent...?

Sounds like "Gentleman" is in a part of the universe where things are not quite so free and open for discussion etc.; at least if considers the reference to Amnesty International...? If that be so then one can perhaps understand the nature of the query and his reactions to the responses here...

I don't doubt that the USDD item to which rilder links - is already well known by many who feel the need to use it or similar; if only to protect themselves from possible prosecution/persecution? Although in any non domestic environment it's always possible that assorted computer kit is still bugged so as to detect/monitor "any" form of use/access; even if via plugin OS devices... One only has to consider what NSA can get up to in the US, GCHQ in the UK, and other similar outfits elsewhere...

A lot to be said for the olde two tin cans with a piece of string tightly stretched between them...


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#11
July 31, 2016 at 09:19:13
trvl: Honorable mention for this post.

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#12
August 1, 2016 at 04:48:59
Curt R: Obviously you haven't got any and are looking for help to circumvent policies in your work place. No I am waiting for you to teach me some since you seem to be full of...those morals. I dont know what makes you so competent to draw that judgment behind the purpose of my question. Jumping to such judgment makes you incompetent to be a moderator on this forum....

What makes me competent as a moderator is that I didn't delete your post up front and ban you from posting.

I allowed you to post what those of us who have been here for years are all pretty sure involves you doing something you shouldn't be as you stated at the outset you're looking for "privacy in the workplace" which is always an obvious red flag.

Point in fact, you do not have any expectation of "privacy in the workplace" Whomever you work for owns the network and the computers you use at work. As such, they have every right to dictate how that equipment can, and can not be used. You wanting "privacy" from them can only be because you want to do something that is specifically not allowed.

These aren't even "morals" although, if you had any, you would realize that after signing a form at working stating you have read and understood the 'appropriate use policy' in place at your work AND you agree to adhere to it, attempting to then circumvent it is wrong. It's more a lack of integrity on your part than a lack of morals though.

The only reason your thread wasn't rejected immediately is because it also asked about privacy on public networks. Had it solely been about wanting privacy at work, nobody would have responded and your post would have been deleted.

As to teaching you morals, that was your parents' job. I'll bet they're ever so proud of you......

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#13
August 1, 2016 at 07:28:05
Curt R: Again pieces of wisdom based on assumptions and jumping to conclusions without any supporting facts. You are building your response on the assumption that everyone who posts here lives in the United States and does business like how it is done there. This twisted thinking is obvious when you said: “after signing a form at working stating you have read and understood the 'appropriate use policy' in place at your work AND you agree to adhere to it” I don’t know who told you that I signed such a form or anyone cares in my job how I use the computer. You seem to think that the whole world follows the US pattern. It is clear to me now that this is not a crisis of morals but ....of mental capacity...Finally “I don’t give a damn” -as you say in the states- if you allow me to post or not. The net is full of resources to use without people like you who try to impose their idealization on posters.

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#14
August 1, 2016 at 08:08:28
No, I'm not assuming you live in the US. I don't, so why should you or any other poster.

All developed countries, including Canada, the US, some central and south American countries and most all of Europe, Russia and Asia all employ some form of "acceptable use policy" in the workplace. Heck, the entire country of China has a strictly enforced AUP that covers everybody.....lol How else could bigger business' control usage and prevent nefarious activity on their networks? It's pretty hard to enforce a policy where none exists.

The only assumption I made was that you worked in a place that employed enough people to have such a thing. I didn't realize you worked in a place with so few employee's that no such thing as an AUP existed.

Not that it matters a whole lot. When you pointedly say you want to hide your internet activity from your work place, whatever it is you're doing is something you already know is wrong/illegal/immoral or just plain bad. That's irrefutable. If what you were doing was on the up-and-up, you wouldn't need to ask about privacy in the workplace.

Your response above while cute, doesn't change the fact that we already know you lack morals, ethics or (most likely) both.


The net is full of resources to use without people like you who try to impose their idealization on posters

You misunderstand, I suspect it's due to YOUR limited mental capacity.

I'm not trying to force my ideals on anybody. But it is policy of this site to not aid hackers. Ergo my statement above about how your post would have been deleted had you not included "privacy on public networks" Your pathetic attempts to (politely) insult me cannot work. I would have to have even one tiny, wee, little iota of respect for you in order for you to be able to hurt my feelings. But since you are a self-admitted person of low moral/ethical character, I have none, zero, zilch respect for you.

Feel free to respond but I've reached my max limit of time and effort spent on losers so I will no longer be reading your responses. But I feel quite certain others who are viewing this are having a good chuckle over you.

My last word on the original question is this: You can't avoid having your employer know exactly what you do if they're watching.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#15
August 1, 2016 at 09:48:22
You continue with your logic free, infuriated argument thinking that you can offend me by it. I am used to handle people like you so you can never offend me.
This time you are admitting making the assumption “you worked in a place that employed enough people to have such a thing. I didn't realize you worked in a place with so few employee's that no such thing as an AUP existed.” If you didn’t realize why did you pass judgment? For your info I don’t live in an advanced country. People here are divided along political lines. They don’t tolerate differences in opinion with each others. I don’t need to alienate my employer by visiting sites that he doesn’t like, knowing that he doesn’t impose any restrictions on net use. So what you said “whatever it is you're doing is something you already know is wrong/illegal/immoral or just plain bad. That's irrefutable. If what you were doing was on the up-and-up, you wouldn't need to ask about privacy in the workplace” is total rubbish and shows how smart of a moderator you are. If you want to be a moderator of any worth – which you are not- you would stick to the facts given in the post without making any assumptions or misjudgements. You feel quite certain that others who are viewing this are having a good chuckle over me by the same irrational standards you use to judge everything else...

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